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Resumes, as we know, are one of the vital tools for job seekers to land their dream jobs. It is an official document that summarizes one’s career trajectory, highlighting relevant skills, experiences, and other qualifications.

And since resumes serve as the first impression that job seekers can make on potential employers, it needs to be appealing, well-written, and properly formatted.

  • To ensure that your resume meets its purpose, you must understand the type of industry you’re applying to as different industries and jobs require different types of resumes.

Using the correct resume format and tailoring it to the job description and company culture can significantly increase your chances of getting shortlisted for interviews.

In fact, studies show that 75% of resumes are rejected by Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) used by recruiters to filter resumes due to poorly optimized resumes.

So what are the different types of resumes and which one is the right option for you?

Read on to get clarity on the same and related FAQs like the following:

  • What are the 5 types of resumes?
  • What are some functional resume examples?
  • What makes an infographic resume?
  • What are the best-targeted resume writing strategies?

What Are the Different Types of Resumes?

Essentially, there are 5 different types of resumes based on the formats and the industry, and learning about them can help you make a more informed decision as to which type of resume is best suited for your needs and situation.

The 5 different types of resumes are - chronological, functional, combination, infographic, and targeted resume. Let’s go through each one of them to get a deeper insight:

Reverse Chronological Resume

  • A reverse chronological resume follows a format that places your most recent experience or educational qualifications at the top, followed by the older ones.

This resume format is one of the most commonly used and recognized as it makes it easy for recruiters to scan through the candidate’s work history. It also supports the ATS-friendliness of the resume.

Having said that, there are also some disadvantages of reverse chronological resumes. Since it places your most recent work experience at the top, it is not suitable for candidates who have employment gaps or if your previous experience is not relevant to the role you’re applying for.

And given that professional experience is the focus of reverse chronological resumes, it is not suitable for freshers.

The primary sequence of sections followed in reverse chronological resumes is - contact information, summary, professional experience, skills, educational qualifications, and certifications.

Also Read: How to make a resume that follows the reverse chronological resume format?

Functional Resumes

  • Functional resumes follow a format that highlights your skills instead of professional experiences.

One of the key characteristics of functional resumes is that it includes a section for a summary of skills that lists various key skills as subheadings with bullet points that further substantiate those skills.

functional resume examples

If you are a candidate with career change, employment gaps, or lack of experience, you can opt for functional resumes to showcase your potential.

However, one of the disadvantages of this type of resume is that it can hamper your resume’s ATS-friendliness. To ensure that this isn’t an issue, you can confirm with individual employers if they use ATS in their recruitment process.

functional resume examples

Also Read: What is a functional resume format?

Combination Resumes

As the name suggests, a combination resume incorporates characteristics of both reverse chronological and functional resumes.

It lays emphasis on your skills and experiences equally, thereby adding more value to your resume. Combination resumes are also ATS-friendly and can be used by applicants who have employment gaps and career changes.

But, there are a couple of disadvantages to using combination resumes as they are time-consuming to make and are not suitable for freshers or candidates who don’t have adequate experience in the industry.

Also Read: What is a combination resume?

Infographic Resumes

Infographic resumes can be an excellent way to stand out from the crowd of applicants while showcasing your creativity and design skills as these resumes are visually appealing.

These type of resumes include graphic design and data visualization elements as it uses graphs, infographics, charts, icons, and illustrations to showcase information, making them extremely engaging for recruiters.

As opposed to traditional resumes, it contains a lesser number of words or written content and makes it easier to communicate complex information in a clear and concise manner.

However, infographic resumes are suitable only for candidates who belong to creative and non-traditional industries like design, marketing, advertising, media, and communication.

And since infographic resumes include a lot of design elements, you need to have decent design skills and be familiar with using design tools to create this type of resume.

Another disadvantage of infographic resumes is that they cannot be parsed by the ATS as most of these systems are not capable of parsing information from charts, graphs, or infographics.

Also Read: What are some great infographic resume design ideas?

Targeted Resumes

  • A targeted resume is a type of resume that is written with a specific employer and job posting in mind. The contents of this resume are tailored to meet the requirements and showcase skills for a particular job vacancy.

While most job seekers use the same resume to apply for multiple job listings, a targeted resume is made to cater to only one.

Since target resumes are highly customized, your chances of getting shortlisted by recruiters are increased threefold.

However, to make a targeted resume, you need to do ample research on the company and analyze the job description in the listing to understand the company’s culture, requirements, etc., making the process time-consuming and complicated.

Here are some tips to help you make a targeted resume with more ease:

  • Identify the key skills and qualification requirements from the job listing and highlight them in your targeted resume.
  • Use the same terminology used in the listing to match your increase the relevance of your resume and make it ATS-friendly for the role.
  • Customize your objective statement or resume summary to express interest in the specific role and company.
  • Include only the experiences, skills, and other information in your target resume that is relevant to the specific role, and skip the rest.
Also Read: What is a targeted resume and how can you make one in 2023?

Key Points from the Blog

  • The 5 different types of resumes are - chronological, functional, combination, infographic, and targeted resume.
  • A combination resume incorporates characteristics of both reverse chronological and functional resumes.
  • Infographic resumes include graphic design and data visualization elements as it uses graphs, infographics, charts, icons, and illustrations to showcase information, making it extremely engaging for recruiters.

Want to create different types of resumes in half the time? Use Hiration’s AI-powered resume builder with 24x7 chat support and write to us at [email protected] if you have any other queries.

5 functional resumes are best suited for

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5 functional resumes are best suited for

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Functional Resume: A Beginner’s Guide with Examples

5 functional resumes are best suited for

In today’s competitive job market, it is essential to make a strong first impression on potential employers. However, traditional chronological resumes may not always be the best option for individuals looking to showcase their unique skills and experiences. This is where functional resumes come into play.

A functional resume focuses on a candidate’s skills and accomplishments rather than their work experience. Rather than listing job titles and specific duties, a functional resume emphasizes the candidate’s abilities and how they can add value to a workplace. It is especially useful for individuals who have gaps in their employment history, are changing careers, or have limited work experience.

Why Choose a Functional Resume

A functional resume can be an excellent option for individuals who want to stand out from other candidates. By highlighting their unique skillset, candidates can show potential employers that they have the necessary qualifications and can be an asset to their organization. Additionally, a functional resume can help applicants who have changed jobs frequently, as it emphasizes their transferable skills rather than their work history.

Benefits of a Functional Resume

There are several benefits to using a functional resume. Firstly, it allows individuals to focus on their strengths, making their application more compelling to potential employers. It can also help reduce concerns about gaps in employment by highlighting the candidate’s skills and experience rather than their work history. Additionally, by presenting their qualifications in a clear and concise manner, candidates may be able to attract the attention of hiring managers more effectively.

A functional resume can be an excellent option for individuals who want to showcase their unique skills and experience. By highlighting their strengths and minimizing perceived weaknesses, candidates can increase their chances of getting hired and landing their dream job.

Anatomy of a Functional Resume

A functional resume is a type of resume that focuses more on skills and achievements, rather than the chronological work history. This style of resume is perfect for job seekers who have significant gaps in their work history or who want to highlight their transferable skills.

5 functional resumes are best suited for

Structure of a Functional Resume

The structure of a functional resume typically involves a few key sections, which include:

Header : This section includes your contact information, such as your name, email address, phone number, and address.

Summary/Objective : This section is a brief statement that highlights your top skills and experiences. This is where you can showcase your unique value proposition and communicate what you can bring to the company.

Skills : In this section, you list your relevant skills, such as technical skills, hard skills, soft skills, and language proficiency.

Experience : This section lists your work experiences and accomplishments, but it is organized by relevant skills rather than by job title or date.

Education : This section includes your educational background and any certifications or awards you may have earned.

Sections of a Functional Resume

All the sections included in a functional resume are designed to showcase your transferable skills and achievements. Unlike a chronological resume which is primarily focused on your work history, a functional resume is tailored to highlight your areas of expertise.

The Difference between a Functional Resume and a Chronological Resume

The key difference between a functional resume and a chronological resume is the focus on your work history. A chronological resume is organized by dates and job titles, while a functional resume is organized by skills and achievements.

A chronological resume is best suited for job seekers who have a consistent work history with minimal gaps. Meanwhile, a functional resume is ideal for job seekers with limited experience or those who want to highlight their transferable skills.

A functional resume is a powerful tool for job seekers who want to stand out from the crowd by showcasing their skills and achievements. The structure and sections of a functional resume are strategically designed to highlight your unique value proposition and communicate what you can bring to the company.

When to Use a Functional Resume

A functional resume is a great choice for certain job seekers depending on their work history, experience, and career goals. Here are some factors to consider when deciding whether to use a functional resume:

Who Should Use a Functional Resume

Functional resumes are ideal for job seekers who have gaps in their work history, have changed careers frequently, or have relevant skills from other work or life experiences. These types of resumes highlight those skills and experiences rather than focusing on specific job titles or employers.

5 functional resumes are best suited for

Another scenario where a functional resume might be appropriate is for recent graduates who have limited work experience but have developed relevant skills through internships, volunteer work, or extracurricular activities.

It’s important to note that functional resumes may not be the best option for recent graduates who are applying to entry-level positions in their field.

Situations that Call for a Functional Resume

There are several situations in which a functional resume may be a better choice than a traditional chronological resume.

If you are returning to work after a long absence, such as raising children, taking care of a family member, or dealing with a personal health issue, a functional resume can help you emphasize skills and experiences gained during that time.

Job seekers who are changing careers may also benefit from a functional resume as it allows them to highlight transferable skills and show how they are relevant to the new industry or job they are seeking.

Finally, if you have had a lot of short-term jobs or freelance work, a functional resume can help you highlight your skills and achievements across those different roles rather than simply listing each job and its duties.

How to Know When a Functional Resume is Appropriate

If you are unsure whether a functional resume is the right choice for you, consider talking to a career counselor or professional resume writer who can help you assess your skills and experience in relation to the jobs you want.

You should also carefully consider the job listing and the employer’s needs. If the job posting emphasizes specific job titles or required experience, a traditional chronological resume may be a better choice.

A functional resume can be a great option for job seekers who have varied work history or skills gained outside of traditional employment. By emphasizing skills and experiences over job titles and employers, it can help you stand out to potential employers and showcase your strengths.

Preparing to Write a Functional Resume

Before you start writing your functional resume, it’s important to take the necessary steps to ensure that your final document is effective in highlighting your skills and qualifications.

Steps for Preparing a Functional Resume

Research the job description: Start by reviewing the job posting or job description thoroughly. Highlight and make note of the skills, experiences, and qualifications that the employer is seeking.

Make a list of your own skills and qualifications: Next, make a list of your own skills and qualifications, taking into account the job requirements that you have identified. This list should include both hard and soft skills, as well as any relevant experience, education or certification.

Evaluate your career history: Take time to evaluate your career history and consider any significant achievements, projects, and experiences that demonstrate your strengths and key competencies.

Decide on resume sections and order: Once you have compiled your list of skills and qualifications, you can start organizing your resume sections. Decide on the order of your sections based on what is most relevant and eye-catching to employers.

Identifying Your Skills and Qualifications

Hard skills: These are specific, measurable technical skills that you have developed through education or experience. Examples include proficiency in a particular computer program or language, hands-on experience with a specific tool or machinery, or certification in a particular discipline.

Soft skills: These are personal attributes that reflect how you interact with others and contribute to an organization’s culture. Examples include communication skills, time management, problem-solving, and leadership skills.

In a functional resume, you will want to prioritize your skills and qualifications above your experience. This way, any potential employer can quickly see what you bring to the table and how you can benefit their organization.

Choosing the Right Format for Your Functional Resume

There are three main formats to consider when writing a functional resume: chronological, hybrid, and functional.

Chronological: In a chronological resume, your experience is listed in reverse chronological order, with your most recent job at the top. Skills and qualifications are typically listed in a separate section below the experience section.

Hybrid: A hybrid resume combines elements of both a chronological and functional resume. The top section of the resume highlights your skills and qualifications, followed by a chronological listing of your work experience.

Functional: In a functional resume, your skills and qualifications take center stage. This format de-emphasizes your work history, but still includes a brief summary of your career achievements, along with a list of relevant work experiences.

When choosing the right format for your functional resume, consider the job requirements and the employer’s preferences. By using the appropriate format and putting your skills and qualifications front and center, you can create a winning functional resume that effectively markets your talents and experience to employers.

Writing a Successful Functional Resume

A functional resume is a great way for job seekers to showcase their skills and experiences without emphasizing their job history. By highlighting your professional accomplishments and qualifications, you can create a powerful resume that will capture the attention of potential employers.

Here are some writing tips to help you craft a successful functional resume:

Writing Tips:

Start with a strong summary statement that highlights your skills and qualifications.

Use bullet points to organize your achievements and skills.

Use action words to describe your achievements and skills, such as “created”, “managed”, “designed”, etc.

Be concise and clear with your language. Avoid using overly complicated industry jargon or long sentences.

Use a standard, easy-to-read font and format your resume consistently throughout.

Next, it’s important to consider what keywords to include in your functional resume.

Keywords to Include in a Functional Resume:

Using relevant keywords can help your resume get through automated applicant tracking systems (ATS) and improve your chances of getting noticed by human recruiters.

Here are some common keywords to include in a functional resume:

  • Industry-specific skills and qualifications
  • Software and technical skills
  • Professional certifications and licenses
  • Project management experience
  • Leadership and team management skills

Remember to include any relevant keywords that match the job description, as this can increase your chances of getting selected for an interview.

Lastly, here are some common mistakes to avoid when writing a functional resume:

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing a Functional Resume:

Not including specific achievements or accomplishments.

Listing irrelevant work experience.

Using a generic summary statement that doesn’t match the job description.

Using buzzwords or industry jargon that may not be understood by recruiters outside of your field.

Focusing too much on job duties and not enough on accomplishments and skills.

By following these tips and avoiding common mistakes, you can create a functional resume that showcases your unique talents, accomplishments, and qualifications. Remember to highlight your skills and experience and tailor your resume to each job description to increase your chances of landing your dream job.

Examples of Functional Resumes

Functional resumes are an excellent option for job seekers who want to draw attention to their skills and abilities instead of their work history. Here are three examples to help you understand how to structure a functional resume:

Example 1: Functional Resume for a Recent Graduate

[Your Name]

Recent Graduate | Seeking Entry-Level [Industry/Position]

Motivated and enthusiastic recent graduate with a [Degree/Major] from [University/College]. Strong academic foundation in [relevant coursework/skills]. Passionate about [industry/field] and eager to apply knowledge and skills in a professional setting. Excellent communication, problem-solving, and teamwork abilities.

  • [Relevant Skill 1]
  • [Relevant Skill 2]
  • [Relevant Skill 3]
  • [Relevant Skill 4]
  • [Year of Graduation]
  • Relevant coursework: [Coursework 1], [Coursework 2], [Coursework 3]
  • [Project 1]: [Brief description and key achievements]
  • [Project 2]: [Brief description and key achievements]
  • [Project 3]: [Brief description and key achievements]

Intern, [Company/Organization]

  • Assisted with [specific tasks/responsibilities].
  • Conducted [research/analysis] to support [project/initiative].
  • Collaborated with team members to [achieve goals/outcomes].

Volunteer, [Organization]

  • Contributed to [specific tasks/responsibilities].
  • Assisted in organizing [events/activities].
  • Demonstrated strong [skill/ability] in a team environment.

Additional Skills

  • Proficient in [Software/Applications]
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills
  • Detail-oriented with excellent organizational abilities
  • Adaptability and willingness to learn

Certifications

  • [Certification 1]
  • [Certification 2]
  • [Certification 3]
  • [Language 1]: Native proficiency
  • [Language 2]: Intermediate proficiency

Example 2: Functional Resume for Experienced Worker

Experienced Professional | [Industry/Position]

Results-driven and accomplished professional with [number of years] of experience in [industry/field]. Proven track record of success in [specific areas/achievements]. Strong leadership, problem-solving, and communication skills. Committed to driving [goals/objectives] and delivering exceptional outcomes.

Professional Experience

[Current/Previous Position], [Company/Organization]

  • [Key Responsibility/Achievement 1]
  • [Key Responsibility/Achievement 2]
  • [Key Responsibility/Achievement 3]

[Previous Position], [Company/Organization]

Additional Experience

[Related Experience 1], [Company/Organization]

[Related Experience 2], [Company/Organization]

  • Strong leadership and team management abilities
  • Excellent problem-solving and decision-making skills
  • Detail-oriented and highly organized

Formatting Your Functional Resume

When it comes to formatting your functional resume, there are key design and layout decisions you must make to present a well-organized, polished document that will catch an employer’s attention. Below are some important design guidelines, font and layout considerations, and tips for creating a professional look.

Design Guidelines

Make sure to choose a clean, easy-to-read design that is visually appealing. Use a standard paper size and keep margins at 1 inch all around. Avoid too much white space, which can make the resume look sparse, but don’t clutter the page with too much text or graphics. Sticking to a one-page format is ideal, but ensure that all relevant and important information is included.

Fonts and Layout Considerations

Your choice of font is important, as it can impact the readability of your resume. Choose a font for headings that stands out, such as Arial or Times New Roman, and use a slightly smaller font size for body text. Avoid fonts that may be harder to read, such as script or cursive styles.

In terms of layout, use bullet points to make information easy to scan and digest. Avoid long, dense paragraphs. Use headings and subheadings to organize content and lead the reader through the document. Additionally, use bolding, italicizing, or underlining to highlight important information, but use these effects sparingly.

Creating a Professional Look

In addition to adhering to design and font guidelines, there are other steps you can take to create a professional look for your functional resume. First, make sure that you have consistent formatting throughout the document. Use the same font, font size, and spacing throughout the body of the resume. This helps create a cohesive, polished look.

Secondly, don’t forget the importance of proofreading. Spelling errors, inaccuracies, or other mistakes can detract from the overall impression of your resume. After drafting your functional resume, take time to review and proofread it thoroughly to ensure that it is error-free.

Finally, consider tailoring your design and format to the job you are applying for. Review the job posting and consider the industry or company you are applying to. Adjust the layout or design elements to fit the desired “feel” of the position or organization.

By following these guidelines and tips, you can create a professional, well-organized functional resume that effectively showcases your unique skills and experience.

Tailoring Your Functional Resume to a Job Posting

When it comes to job hunting, tailoring your functional resume to a job posting is crucial. A functional resume is designed to highlight your skills and accomplishments, rather than just your work experience, which makes it a great choice for those who have gaps in their job history or who are changing careers. However, to really make your functional resume stand out, you need to tailor it to the specific job you’re applying for.

Job Posting Analysis

Before you start tailoring your functional resume, you need to carefully analyze the job posting to understand what the employer is looking for. Look for keywords and phrases that are repeated throughout the posting. Pay attention to the qualifications and requirements that the employer is looking for. Think about how your skills and experience match up with what they’re looking for.

Targeted Functional Resumes

Once you’ve analyzed the job posting, it’s time to start tailoring your functional resume. Start by creating a master resume that includes all of your skills and work experience. From there, you can create targeted functional resumes for each job you apply for. Use the keywords and phrases you found in the job posting to highlight your skills and accomplishments that match up with what the employer is looking for.

As you’re creating your targeted functional resume, keep the job posting in mind. Customize your objective statement to align with the position you’re applying for. Use the same language and terminology that the employer uses in the posting. Highlight your skills and accomplishments that are most relevant to the position.

The Importance of a Tailored Functional Resume

Tailoring your functional resume to the job you’re applying for is important for a few reasons. First, it shows the employer that you’ve taken the time to research the position and understand what they’re looking for. Second, it highlights your skills and accomplishments that are most relevant to the position, which makes you a stronger candidate. Finally, it helps you stand out from the other applicants who may be using a generic functional resume.

Tailoring your functional resume to a job posting is a crucial step in your job search. By analyzing the job posting, creating targeted functional resumes, and highlighting your most relevant skills and accomplishments, you can increase your chances of standing out from the crowd and landing the job you want.

Cover Letter Writing Tips for a Functional Resume

When it comes to job hunting, a functional resume can be an effective tool to showcase your skills and qualifications. However, it’s important to remember that your cover letter also plays a crucial role in the application process. In this section, we’ll discuss some tips on how to incorporate your functional resume into your cover letter, highlight your skills and qualifications, and address any employment gaps.

Incorporating Your Functional Resume into Your Cover Letter

Your cover letter should complement your functional resume and not simply repeat information. Therefore, it’s important to think about how your skills and qualifications can be integrated into your cover letter. One effective approach is to use specific examples of how your skills and experience match the requirements of the job you’re applying for.

For example, if you’re applying for a marketing position and your functional resume highlights your experience in social media management and content creation, you could mention specific campaigns you’ve managed in your cover letter. This shows the hiring manager that you have the skills they’re looking for and have experience applying them in a professional context.

Highlighting Your Skills and Qualifications in Your Cover Letter

Your cover letter is a chance to really highlight your strengths as a candidate. Rather than simply listing your qualifications, take the opportunity to explain how your skills and experience make you a good fit for the position.

For example, if you’re a recent graduate with limited work experience, you could focus on your academic achievements and any relevant coursework or projects. Alternatively, if you have years of experience in a particular field, you could explain how that experience has given you a unique perspective on the job you’re applying for.

Addressing Employment Gaps in Your Cover Letter

If your functional resume includes employment gaps, it’s important to address these issues in your cover letter. Rather than trying to hide or explain away the gaps, be honest about what you were doing during that time and emphasize any skills or experience you gained.

For example, if you took a break from work to care for a family member, you could explain how that experience taught you valuable communication and organizational skills. Alternatively, if you pursued a personal project during your employment gap, you could highlight how that experience gave you new perspectives or taught you new skills.

Your cover letter offers a chance to expand on the information in your functional resume and showcase your skills and qualifications. By incorporating specific examples and addressing any employment gaps, your cover letter can help you stand out as a strong candidate for any job.

Submitting a Functional Resume

When it comes to submitting a functional resume, there are several tips and strategies that can help increase your chances of landing an interview. Additionally, it’s important to be prepared to follow up on your application and deal with rejection if necessary.

Tips for Submitting Your Functional Resume

Here are some tips for submitting your functional resume:

Customize your resume for each job application. Your functional resume should be tailored to the specific job you’re applying for. Highlight the skills and experiences that are most relevant to the position.

Use keywords from the job description. Many companies use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to scan resumes for relevant keywords. Make sure you include keywords from the job description to increase your chances of passing the ATS screening.

Focus on achievements rather than duties. Instead of listing your job duties, highlight your accomplishments and how you added value to your previous roles. This will help the employer see the impact you can make in their organization.

Keep it concise and easy to read. A functional resume should be no longer than two pages, with clear headings and bullet points to organize the information.

Following up on Your Functional Resume

After submitting your functional resume, it’s important to follow up on your application to demonstrate your interest and enthusiasm for the position. Here are some tips for following up:

Wait a week before following up. Give the employer a chance to review your application before reaching out.

Send a brief email. Keep your follow-up email short and to the point. Thank the employer for their time and express your interest in the position.

Showcase your skills and experience. Use your follow-up email as an opportunity to highlight your relevant skills and experience, and why you’re a good fit for the job.

Be persistent but polite. If you don’t hear back after your initial follow-up, it’s okay to send another email or make a phone call. However, remain polite and professional in your communication.

Dealing with Rejection

Unfortunately, rejection is a part of the job search process. Here are some tips for handling rejection:

Don’t take it personally. Rejection doesn’t mean you’re not a qualified candidate or that you’ll never find a job. It’s simply part of the hiring process.

Ask for feedback. If possible, ask the employer for feedback on why you weren’t selected for the position. This can help you improve your resume and job search strategy moving forward.

Keep a positive attitude. It’s important to maintain a positive attitude and stay motivated during the job search process. Surround yourself with supportive friends and family, and focus on the opportunities that lie ahead.

Submitting a functional resume can be an effective way to showcase your skills and experience to potential employers.

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5 functional resumes are best suited for

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5 functional resumes are best suited for

The Functional Resume Format: Tips & Examples (2024 - Updated)

5 functional resumes are best suited for

Table of Contents

Tips and tricks for writing a functional resume.

Generally, there are three types of resume formats, each with its own benefits and drawbacks. There is no one-size-fits-all template, but the resume-verse does have something for everyone. In order to avoid the resume blackhole , you need a layout that helps you stand out. 

That might sound strange, but many professions prioritize a seasoned expert with cultivated skills. One just needs to know how to use a functional resume to catch the eye of potential employers . Here at Qureos, we plan to teach you exactly that.  ‍

1. What Is a Functional Resume?

The functional resume is also known as a skill-based resume. That is because it focuses on marketing the applicant’s skills rather than work experience. It is the ideal format for those who have curated a highly diverse and effective skill set, which would be greatly productive in any job setting. 

Compared to the chronological or combination resume, this format is targeted towards a set group of employers who require a refined skill set rather than a history of professional work experiences. This resume showcases your ambitions relevant to the job, rather than what you have already accomplished.

‍ 2. What Is the Functional Resume Structure?

Let us guide you on how to make an impressive resume . To help you visualize it, this is what the standard functional resume should look like:

5 functional resumes are best suited for

1. Contact Information

Your information should include your full name, city and country, telephone or mobile number, and email address. It can also have links to any professional websites or portfolios, like LinkedIn, Behance, or your personal e-portfolio. 

This is a necessary step because many employers will use your information to get back to you. Make sure to add this in your header, with your name in a larger font.  ‍

2. Resume Summary 

Though a solid cover letter executes this role in detail, a resume summary or objective is necessary to highlight your capabilities as a candidate. A brief yet straightforward passage must explain how you are the perfect fit for this role. If you lack work experience, a resume objective works better on a skills-based CV. Remember to be professional, keeping it relevant to the role you have applied for.

3. Skills Section

Here, you can experiment with that displays your skills in the most attractive, strong way. 

Usually, functional resumes start off with the first skills sections, called ‘summary of qualifications’, ‘relevant skills’, ‘technical skills’, and more. In bullet point format, list down all skills relevant to your job description . To further diversify your resume and intrigue your employer, you can mention self-taught skills on your resume as well!

Remember to give examples of where, when, or how you’ve implemented said skills. 

‍ 4. Professional Skills

Here, you are required to hone in on the important skills that are most likely to secure your acceptance. In a bulleted list, highlight two or three crucial skills that the employer will not be able to turn away. Then, detail when, where, and how you implemented said skills and what you achieved. 

Additionally, to further strengthen your resume, mention metrics, statistics, or any number that validates your accomplishments. Data evidence will give credibility to your skills, which is necessary. 

‍ 5. Work Experience, If Any 

In case you have any work experience, a functional resume has the space to include that. Below are your skills, like your professional history in reverse-chronological order. Start from the latest position held and describe your roles, skills, and achievements during that period. 

On the other hand, if you don’t have any experience – that’s fine! A functional resume is specifically designed to market your skills over everything else. 

‍ 6. Education

Lastly, write your educational background. Your college and degree are the most important to mention. It's not important to mention your GPA unless it is specifically asked for. Also, you can add any certifications, honors, or important medals you have received. However, ensure they are all appropriate for the job you have applied for.  

After curating your resume, it’s best to run it through a resume score calculator . This will further strengthen your profile and give you an added level of reassurance.

‍ 3. Who Should Use a Functional Resume?

For some, functional resumes can be a holy grail. It is vital to create a killer portfolio that guarantees acceptance, so it’s best to see if the functional resume meets your requirements before creating one. 

Of course, this resume is perfect for those job positions that value skills over practical experience. The format allows for your most valuable skills to shine up upfront, allowing potential employers to screen that section immediately.

Secondly, if you’re someone who has frequently switched careers, has worked in various departments, or lacks a career niche, the functional resume helps you stand out. For those with an unstructured career trajectory, this format encourages them to highlight their learning and skill development.

Thirdly, the functional resume is a highly useful format for fresh graduates or students who do not have work experience or are currently in school. Don’t fret, as one’s education and college experience are sources of skill-building that is of value to hiring managers. 

Additionally, the uniqueness of the functional resume intrigues employers. Therefore, this format is excellent for those who have employment gaps. Aside from focusing on your talents and capabilities, it adds another level to your application. 

Lastly, if you’re aiming for a drastic career shift into a different field, this format is for you. You can showcase how your pre-existing skills are flexible and generalizable to every environment. The functional resume can present you as an adaptable and multi-talented individual who can fit into any field!

However, in some cases, the functional resume may not be the right fit. Firstly, if you do have work experience that spans three to ten years and is relevant to the job. Or, if you want to display a steady career trajectory with advancements. In such a case, draft a combination resume or chronological resume. 

‍ 4. Functional Resume VS Chronological Resume?

A noticeable difference is that of formatting. A functional resume begins with your contact details, followed by a detailed outline of your capabilities, and any certifications. Lastly, it ends with relevant job experiences and educational background. 

Whereas the chronological resume starts off with identification details, followed by a resume summary, and a list of your work history. The latter is featured in reverse-chronological order. Unlike the functional resume, this format displays your education, certifications, and skills very briefly, at the end.

Secondly, while some may reject functional resumes for being disjointed or incomplete, some hiring managers prefer candidates who can work in any industry. While, chronological resumes are generally preferred, especially for job positions that require specific expertise and experience. 

Lastly, the functional resume enhances your skills as it does not prioritize what you have or have not done. It is future-focused that portrays you as a flexible candidate with holistic skills, able to succeed in any field, despite minimum work experience. 

However, a chronological resume values your work history, using it to craft a story that is appealing to employers. It focuses on showcasing accomplishments and your evolution as an employee. 

5. Functional Resume VS Combination Resume?

While we’ve mentioned the functional resume’s format, a combination resume is structured differently. It opens with contact information, a resume summary or objective, a bulleted skills list, and a chronological work experience section, ending with educational background. Unlike the functional resume, it bequeaths equal importance to skills and professional history, suitable for mid-level experienced employees. 

While a functional resume is received as an unexpected and non-traditional application, combination resumes are more creative and diverse. Though, this varies from employer to employer.

Finally, while a functional resume is focused on emphasizing your skills, a combination resume bequeaths equal importance to skills and professional history, suitable for mid-level experienced employees. 

This comprehensive guide on functional resumes is enough to kickstart you on your journey of designing an eye-catching resume. There are several brilliant resume templates available online – so don’t wait and land your dream job today!

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How to Write a Functional Resume

Functional resumes are best for applicants who'd like to highlight their skills as opposed to the jobs they've held. If you have job hopped, been out of work for a while, lack experience, or if you're entering a different field, this resume format will place emphasis on your transferable skills and other useful attributes, like education.

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Functional vs. Chronological Resume:

A functional resume foregrounds skills and is suitable for those with limited work experience or employment gaps. A functional resume repackages your experience so that employers look favorably upon it, whereas a chronological resume is geared towards applicants with extensive work experience.

How to Write a Functional Resume:

No matter the type of resume you choose, there are some basic guidelines you'll have to follow when you construct each section. Read through our step-by-step guide for a comprehensive look at how to make a great impression on the hiring manager.

Guidelines to follow when writing your functional resume.

List your contacts..

List your name and contact details at the top of the resume. Always use a professional email address and a reliable contact number, and include your LinkedIn profile or any links to websites relevant to your work.

Include a career summary.

Directly after your contact details, include a brief Career Summary or Resume Objective beneath your contact details. A Resume Objective might be more suited to a Functional Resume.

List your education history.

Start with the most recently obtained qualifications. Include any degrees, diplomas, or certificates that are relevant to the position you are applying for. Be sure to mention awards and achievements that highlight your key skills.

List your skills.

Include at least three main skills that are essential to the position you are applying for. The skills section of the functional resume is more detailed than that of the chronological format. Beneath each skill, include a bullet point or two about how you developed that skill.

Showcase your work experience.

Lastly, include your work experience, listing any volunteer or part-time positions you've held. Even if you've never been formally employed, mention any leadership positions you've occupied.

Tips for Writing a Functional Resume:

  • Choose a simple font like Times New Roman, Arial, or Helvetica. Use black and font size 10 You may bold the headings.
  • Do not use color or fancy graphics and be mindful to remove them if you are using resume builders .
  • Do not include false information on your resume or try to hide gaps in employment.
  • Use Grammarly to pick up mistakes and also get someone else to read over your final resume before you submit it.
  • Before sending your resume off, read our article on How to Email your Resume to the Hiring Manager .

Download our Functional Resume Template:

Start applying for jobs today using our Functional Resume template.

Functional Resume Template: (Text version)

[Your Full Name] [Your contact number] | [Your professional email address] | [Your LinkedIn profile/website/a link to your online portfolio]

Education [Name of the educational institution | Location (year started – year ended)] [Name of degree as well as majors/another relevant certificate] [Any special achievements or awards obtained]

[Name of the educational institution | Location (year started – year ended)] [Name of degree as well as majors/another relevant certificate] [Any special achievements or awards obtained]

Skills [List Main Skill, e.g. leadership] [Have one or two bullets beneath this skill where you elaborate on how you developed it, e.g. you were the vice president of the debate society in college]

[List Main Skill, e.g. leadership] [Have one or two bullets beneath this skill where you elaborate on how you developed it, e.g. you were the vice president of the debate society in college]

Experience (Include the most current position first. If you’re a new graduate or someone with limited formal work experience, you may want to include any volunteer positions or part-time work you’ve done.)

[Date of employment with year/month – year/month] [Position Title] [Company Name and location] [Include 2-4 bullet points with all your responsibilities and accomplishments]

Resume Tips

What is the format of a functional resume?

A functional resume should span one page and it has a detailed section for your skills. In order, the Functional Resume includes the following sections:

  • Personal contact information .
  • Resume Objective .
  • Education .
  • Work experience .

Who should use a functional resume?

Those who are new to the workplace, lack extensive experience within a particular industry, or have gaps in employment, might want to use the functional resume and highlight their skills instead of their employment history.

How do you list skills on a functional resume?

The skill section fits just below your education section on your resume. Include at least three main skills and write a short description beneath each one, about one or two bullets, explaining how you obtained that skill as well as your understanding of its significance.

How do I write a functional resume with no experience?

A functional resume format works well for those with no experience. Under the Experience section, list any part-time jobs or volunteer work. If you haven't volunteered or worked part-time, you can include any leadership positions under this section, for example, Treasurer of the Fencing Club.

Is a functional resume bad?

Functional resumes are not always compatible with an ATS (Applicant Tracking System). Also, for many Hiring Managers, work experience is the most important section of a resume, and it's what they'd like to see first when they look through yours. Take a look at the other resume formats before deciding which option is best for you.

How long is a functional resume?

Try to limit your functional resume to one page, but it is okay to have up to two pages for this format.

What is the difference between a chronological and a functional resume?

A chronological resume emphasizes work experience, while a functional resume highlights skills.

Related Articles:

How to write a chronological resume, how to write a combination resume, cv vs. resume, google docs resume template, best resume layout.

The 6 Types of Resumes (+ Which One Fits You Best)

Dave Fano

You know, a professional resume is more than just a list—it's a way to position yourself as the right fit for a role. 

There are actually six types of resumes to consider—each one designed to highlight experience and skills in a different way. 

Understanding these resume formats and choosing the right one for your industry, experience, and personal strengths can elevate your qualifications and present your career journey in the best possible light.

3 key takeaways

  • The six different types of resumes and their benefits
  • Which resume format is best suited for your industry
  • Creating a professional resume with Teal’s AI Resume Builder

Teal Note: Unless you’re a student, recent graduate, or pivoting careers, a chronological resume is the best way to showcase your career journey in a straightfoward, easily recognizable way.

1. Chronological resume

The most common (and most preferred) resume format is the chronological resume. 

As its name suggests, this resume lays out your work experience in reverse chronological order. Meaning your most recent job takes the top spot, and the rest follow in descending order.

Key industries: Fields like finance, law, and healthcare favor this format, but it's versatile enough to work for most sectors. It's a hit among recruiters and hiring managers, as it offers a clear view of your career trajectory, highlighting consistent growth and dedication.

Formatting specifics: Start with your contact details and a concise resume summary. Next, list your work experience, with the job title, company name, location, and the dates you were employed. 

Beneath each role, outline key achievements. Conclude with your education, certifications, and any relevant skills or tools you're proficient in.

Why it's a good option: The chronological resume format is straightforward and intuitive, making it easy for employers to see your professional experience. If you've had a steady career without many gaps and you're staying within the same industry, this format best showcases your expertise and progression.

5 functional resumes are best suited for

Benefits of a chronological resume

  • Clarity and cohesiveness: This format provides a clear roadmap of your career journey. For readers, it's like flipping through a well-organized storybook where they can easily trace the main character's progression.
  • Immediate insights: A chronological resume's structure lets hiring managers immediately gauge your recent roles, responsibilities, and growth—all vital insights.
  • Industry favorability: As mentioned earlier, several industries prefer the chronological format. It adheres to their expectations and offers a conventional appeal.
  • Spotlight on accomplishments: The chronological format showcases your accomplishments, potentially making you a more desirable candidate.

Does this format fit you best?

This style is a perfect match for those with a consistent work history and minimal employment gaps. 

If you're climbing the ladder within a specific industry or field and want to highlight your upward trajectory and accomplishments, this format will serve you well.

2. Functional resume

At its heart, the functional resume format is all about skills and qualifications over chronological work history. 

Instead of focusing on job titles and the duration of your employment, this style hones in on your abilities, expertise, and specific competencies.

Key industries: This format is a favorite among freelancers and consultants with varied experiences across different projects and clients.

Formatting specifics: Begin with your contact details and a robust summary emphasizing your core competencies. Instead of a timeline of jobs, curate categories based on skills or areas of expertise, like "Project Management" or "Graphic Design." 

Under each category, use bullet points to list achievements and experiences that validate your proficiency. Of course, you'll wrap things up with your education and any other pertinent details.

Why it's a good option: For those with gaps in their employment or a diverse range of short-term projects and roles, the functional format is a life-saver. It allows you to focus on your strengths, irrespective of when and where you acquired them.

Benefits of a functional resume

  • Skills showcase: This format is an excellent stage for your talents and proficiencies, allowing you to portray your value proposition upfront.
  • Gap guardian: Had a hiatus or two in your career? The functional resume deflects attention away from employment gaps, focusing instead on what you can do.
  • Flexibility and freedom: For those with a broad spectrum of experiences, the functional style offers the liberty to strategically tailor content, emphasizing relevant skills for the role at hand.
  • Adaptability: Transitioning industries or roles? This resume lets you present transferable skills, which can be a catalyst for making successful switches.

The functional resume might be your best ally if you've juggled diverse roles, taken sabbaticals, or are looking for a career change. It's particularly apt for those who want their skills to do the talking rather than a linear job history. 

On the flip side, some recruiters are wary of this format, as it can be difficult to correlate skills with specific roles. So if you're in a traditional field or have a straightforward career path, a different format might be more advantageous. 

3. Combination resume

Meet the hybrid powerhouse: the combination resume. Merging the best of both worlds—chronological and functional—it offers a balanced take on your work history and the skills you bring to the table.

Key industries: Due to its versatility, the combination format finds favor across a multitude of sectors. It's especially handy for students, recent graduates, and those just starting out as it offers a blend of experience and skills.

Formatting specifics: Kick things off with your contact information, followed by a punchy resume summary. Up next is a competencies and hard skills section. 

Then, flow into a chronological account of your employment history (possibly in a more condensed form than in a purely chronological resume). And as always, cap it off with your educational credentials and any additional relevant information.

Why it's a good option: The combination resume is the Swiss Army knife of the best resume formats . It lends the latitude to play up strongest suits, like skills or your storied career journey, while providing a structured timeline of your professional past.

Pro Tip: The Teal AI Resume Builder has a Drag-and-Drop Editor so you can arrange the sections of your resume however you want.

Benefits of a combination resume

  • Best of both worlds: Enjoy the structure of a chronological resume with the skill emphasis of a functional one. 
  • Tailored pitch: Given its dual nature, you can tweak the emphasis based on the job you're aiming for, making your application more adaptable and relevant.
  • Comprehensive yet concise: While it showcases both skills and job history, the combination format encourages brevity, ensuring your resume isn’t just informative but also reader-friendly.
  • Career progression + skill depth: This format allows employers to see where you've been and dive deep into what you can offer.

If you're just starting your career or a professional with a mix of varied roles and hard-won skills, the combination resume might be your golden ticket. It's especially good for those looking to highlight how their experiences and abilities align perfectly with a specific role. 

That said, it can be a little longer, so it's important to keep content tight. One page for ten years of less of experience is ideal. If you’re at a stage where both your skills and experiences are pivotal to your next role, the hybrid style is worth considering. 

4. Targeted resume

The name says it all. A targeted resume is laser focused, tailored for a specific job or role. Instead of a general overview of your career, this format hones in on the experiences, skills, and accomplishments directly relevant to the position you want.

Key industries: Any industry that values precision and specialization can appreciate a targeted resume. Whether it's tech, where specifics of coding languages or platforms matter, or marketing, where niche skills like inbound certification or PPC expertise can set you apart, this format shines.

Formatting specifics: Start, as always, with your contact details and a bespoke resume summary, tuned to the role at hand. List your work experience, but selectively—only those roles and tasks that resonate with the job description. 

Similarly, cherry-pick skills and qualifications that match the job's requirements. Conclude with your education and any certifications or training applicable to the role.

Why it's a good option: A targeted resume is the epitome of relevance. In a sea of generic resumes, this format stands out, signaling to employers your keen interest and alignment with the role. It can also be useful if you have a long, varied work history to condense down to a one-page resume .

Benefits of a targeted resume

  • Precision power: Every element of your resume speaks directly to the role, ensuring zero fluff and maximum impact.
  • Increased relevance: By mirroring the job's requirements, your resume is likely to resonate more with hiring managers, boosting your chances of being shortlisted.
  • Adaptable approach: While it requires more effort, this format can be tweaked for various roles, ensuring you always put your best foot forward.
  • Demonstrates commitment: Crafting a targeted resume shows potential employers that you've done your homework and are genuinely interested in the role.

The targeted resume is ideal for those who are very clear about their job aspirations and are willing to put in the extra effort for each application. It's especially good for roles where the competition is fierce or when applying to highly specialized positions. 

However, it may not be the most time-efficient choice if you're casting a wider net in your job search. If specificity is your game, and you believe in quality over quantity in job applications, then go with the targeted approach. 

5. Infographic resume

When visuals dance in harmony with words, you get the infographic resume. A colorful deviation from traditional text-based resumes, this format leans on graphics, charts, and designs to encapsulate your career story in an engaging and visually compelling manner.

Key industries: Infographic resumes find their natural habitat in creative fields like graphic design, advertising, digital marketing, and multimedia. 

Formatting specifics: While the core elements—contact information, experience, skills, and education—remain consistent, how you present them changes. 

Use bar graphs to depict skill proficiency, timelines for career progression, and icons for contact details. Employ colors, fonts, and layouts that embody your personal brand while ensuring clarity and coherence.

Why it's a good option: In a world where attention spans are dwindling, an infographic resume can capture and retain interest, differentiating you from a pile of traditional resumes. 

Benefits of an infographic resume

Visually engaging: The rich, visual nature of this format ensures your resume doesn't just get seen—it gets noticed and remembered.

Showcases creativity: Especially relevant for creative roles, it's a testament to your design sensibilities and your ability to present information innovatively.

Distills information: Complex data or varied experiences can be condensed into easily digestible visual chunks, making it easier for hiring managers to grasp your story.

Creates conversation starters: Unique visuals or data representations can become talking points in interviews, allowing you to steer conversations.

If you're venturing into a field that values creativity, design, or innovative communication, an infographic resume might be your canvas. 

Teal Note: If you're applying to any roles where applicant tracking systems (ATS) are used, a more conventional, less designed resume is preferred as the ATS cannot scan heavily designed resumes correctly. 

6. Non-traditional resume

Unlike traditional resumes , the non-traditional resume is an umbrella term for any format that shirks convention. This can include video resumes, web-based portfolios, personal landing pages, or even interactive digital CVs that utilize dynamic media and content.

Key industries: Non-traditional resumes are a hit in dynamic sectors that embrace innovation and unique self-expression. Think digital media, video production, web development, content creation, and cutting-edge tech startups. They're also increasingly recognized in sectors open to modern recruitment practices.

Formatting specifics: As varied as the mediums they embrace, non-traditional resumes don't have a fixed format. A video resume might see you introducing yourself and your achievements on camera, while a web portfolio could house projects, testimonials, and interactive CV elements. Just ensure it's navigable, accessible, and relevant to your target role.

Why it's a good option: The non-traditional resume isn't just a document—it's an experience. It offers a multidimensional view of your capabilities, going beyond just qualifications to provide a sense of your personality, creativity, and initiative.

Looking for a standout approach? Teal's Career Hub resources can guide you.

Benefits of a non-traditional resume

  • Makes a bold statement: By its very nature, a non-traditional resume announces you as someone willing to take risks and think outside the box.
  • Offers depth: Whether it's showcasing a project in a portfolio or narrating your journey in a video, it provides a richer, more comprehensive view of your professional persona.
  • Enhanced engagement: The interactive or dynamic nature of such resumes ensures higher engagement, making recruiters spend more time with your application.
  • Leverages modern technology : In our digital age, showcasing your comfort and proficiency with newer media can be a strong selling point in many industries.

Embrace a non-traditional resume if you're in a field that celebrates uniqueness and modern mediums or if you believe a conventional resume won't do you justice. 

If you're tech-savvy, creatively inclined, or looking to join a forward-thinking industry, this could be your stage. However, be wary when applying to extremely traditional sectors or when an ATS might be in play. 

Build a professional resume with Teal

For modern job seekers, navigating the world of resumes can feel like traversing a maze.

But remember, the most powerful resume isn't just about format—it's about content and fit. 

With Teal’s AI Resume Builder, it’s easy to create a strong resume that balances powerful content with a clean format. Highlight your skills, build a personalized professional summary, and get real-time feedback and recommendations for improvements to build your strongest resume yet. 

Get started with Teal for free today ! 

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CareerNewton

Is a Functional Resume Format the Right Choice for You?

Look no further than our functional resume format. Our easy-to-use format makes it easy for you to showcase your skills and experience in a clear, concise manner. Plus, our handy tips and resources will help you create an effective resume that will showcase your unique skills and qualifications. So start building your career today with the help of our functional resume format.

In a functional resume format, you focus on the relevant skills and achievements of the applicant, rather than on their previous work history or work experience. It is widely used by job applicants who have gaps in their work history, are switching careers, or have a wide range of relevant skills that may not be showcased in a traditional chronological resume format.

In a functional resume format, the applicant includes their skills and accomplishments under proper headings, such as “Project Management,” “Effective Communication,” or “Creativity”. Each of these sections is then followed by relevant examples of how the candidate has proven those skills in previous job roles. 

Though a functional resume can be a powerful tool for certain job applicants, it may not be suitable for every situation. Hence, it is important to consider the job requirements and the recommendations of the employer before choosing a functional resume format.

The Framework Of a Functional Resume Format

functional engineering resume example

Here is the breakdown of all resume sections in combination resume format-

At the top of your resume, include your full name, present address, phone number, and email address. You can also include your social media profiles and website if any.

Professional Summary or Objective Statement:

A short summary of your all-relevant skills, experience, and achievements. This section should be customized as per the job profile you’re applying for and display how your experience aligns with the employer’s requirements.

A section where you can showcase your relevant skills, including technical skills, language expertise, and other relevant skills. This section can be formatted as a key point or a paragraph.

Accomplishments Section:

This resume section displays your most significant achievements, including rewards, publications, certifications, and any other relevant accomplishments.

Work History:

This resume section should show all your previous jobs in reverse chronological order, starting with your most recent job role. For each job, provide the company name, job profile, employment timeline, and a short summary of your responsibilities and achievements. Use key points to make this information easy to read and understand.

Include your educational history in reverse chronological order, starting with your most recent degree or certification. Provide the name of the institution, the degree or certification earned, and the graduation timeline.

When To Use A Functional Resume Format?

A functional resume format highlights your relevant skills and expertise, rather than showcasing your previous work experience. A functional resume can be a powerful tool for certain job applicants, it may not be suitable for every situation.

Here are some situations when you should use a functional resume format:

When you have breaks in your work history:

If you have breaks in your work history or have regularly changed job roles, a functional resume format can help you to understate those gaps and highlight your relevant skills and expertise.

When you are switching careers:

If you are changing career fields or pivoting into a new industry, a functional resume format can help you to showcase relevant transferable skills and relevant experiences that may not be highlighted in your work history.

When your work history is not relevant to the job profile:

If you have work experience that is not directly relevant to the job profile you are applying for, a functional resume format can help you to showcase the skills and experiences that are relevant to the job profile you are applying for.

When you want to show up:

A functional resume format can help you to be noticed among other candidates by showcasing your unique skills and expertise, rather than just including your previous work experience in chronological order.

It’s significant to note that while a functional resume can be useful in specific situations, some employers may consider it as an effort to hide gaps in work experience or lack of relevant experience in a specific field. Hence, it’s important to focus on the job requirements and the preferences of the employer before selecting a functional resume format.

When To Use A Different Resume Format?

Although a functional resume format can be useful in certain situations, there are some situations where it may not be suitable.

Here are some prominent situations when you should consider using resume formats other than functional resume format-

When you have a solid work history:

In case you have a decent past work history with no prominent gaps in employment, a chronological resume format may be more suitable. A chronological resume allows you to highlight your previous work experience in a simple and readable format.

When you are applying for a job role in a similar field:

In case you are applying for a job role in the similar field as your previous work experience, a chronological resume format may be more suitable. This helps you to showcase your relevant work experience and display how you have developed and evolved in your relevant field with time.

When the employer recommends a specific format:

In case the employer categorically mentions a chronological resume or combination format, it’s very vital to follow their instructions.

When the job role needs specific experience:

In case the job role requires specific experience, a functional resume format may not be the optimal choice. Here, it’s mandatory to showcase your relevant experience in a simple and brief way, which can be easily done through a chronological resume format.

At last, the best resume format depends on your individual conditions, the job role you are applying for, and the choices of the employer. It’s important to carefully think about your options and choose the resume format that best highlights your skills and experiences while fulfilling the requirements of the job role.

Some Functional Resume Format Examples

Showcases relevant skills in place of work history-.

Here, Emma has selected the functional resume format to focus on her skills rather than work experience which has a few gaps. She is willing to apply for a job role that is relevant to her skills, not work history. In functional resume formats, employers can easily scan an applicant’s relevant skill.

Functional sales resume example

Showcases a career change-

Here, Rashmi has selected the functional resume format where she is willing to switch her career from her past work experience. She is opting to change her career field and apply for a job role that is relevant to her skills. In functional resume formats, she focuses on skills that are relevant to the job role she is applying for.

functional education resume example

Showcases a resume to stand out-

Here, Rashmi has selected the functional resume format where she is showcasing all the relevant details of her work experience, educational details, skills and expertise. In the functional resume format, she has listed all relevant details that can surely help her to show up among other applicants and get noticed and hired by relevant employers.

Frequently Asked Questions-

Q1. When should I choose a functional resume format?

A functional resume format is best suited for candidates who have gaps in their employment history, are switching careers, have less work experience, or want to focus on their skills and achievements. It is also beneficial for those applicants whose previous job titles do not showcase the type of work they are seeking in their next job role.

Q2. What are the advantages of using a functional resume format?

The advantage of using a functional resume format is that it focuses on a candidate’s skills and accomplishments, makes it convenient to display how a candidate’s experience is relevant to the job role they are applying for, and reduces the impact of gaps in work history.

Q3. What are the limitations of using a functional resume format?

The limitations of using a functional resume format are that it does not focus on a chronological history of a candidate’s work experience, which may be desired by some employers. It may also be assumed as hiding gaps in work history or making it complex for employers to see a candidate’s career advancement.

Q4. What sections should be added in a functional resume format?

A functional resume format usually contains sections for skills, achievements, qualifications, education, and relevant work experience. The skills section should showcase the candidate’s potential and abilities, and the achievements section should highlight their accomplishments. The qualifications section should include a brief summary of the candidate’s professional background and the education section should include their academic qualifications. The work experience section should showcase relevant examples of how the candidate’s skills and accomplishments are relevant to the job role they are applying for.

Q5. How should I format my functional resume?

The format of a functional resume should be simple, easy to read and understand. The sections should be arranged in a logical order, with the most significant information listed first. The font size and style should be maintained throughout the document, and key points should be included to make the information easier to read and understand. It is also important to customize the resume to the job description and use relevant keywords that match the job role.

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Home » Job Tips » Resume Writing Tips » Resume Format

Best Resume Formats with Samples, Templates, & Writing Tips

Resume Format

Despite having all the necessary qualifications, landing a job can still be difficult. However, a staggering 68% of candidates who use professional resume writing services are able to secure employment within 90 days after sending out their resumes. Clearly demonstrating how crucial it is to get your resume formatted right.

So in this blog post, we will explore why selecting an appropriate resume format matters and provide useful tips on structuring yours professionally. Learn about different elements which should feature on a good résumé as well as popular formats that you may want to consider using in order elevate your job search prospects.

Table of Contents

What is a Resume Format?

A resume format typically refers to the specific design, layout, and structure of a job seeker’s resume or curriculum vitae. This can include things such as 

  • Which parts are included in the document (e.g., contact information, work experience), 
  • How much detail is given for each section/item mentioned 
  • Where different sections should be placed within it (for example whether your references come after professional skills or education). 

There are various types of commonly used formats including chronological resumes, functional resumes, and combination resumes. Additionally, some employers may require that applicants adhere strictly to particular formatting instructions when submitting their letters for consideration. This enables recruiters to assess submitted documents more efficiently otherwise risk having them discarded without even being read through entirely.

You can also learn more about how to create the perfect resume, by taking this business communication skills course .

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Best Resume Format to Get a Job

When selecting a resume format for job applications, you have three popular and effective options available: chronological, functional, and combination. Each one has different benefits that are tailored to the role you’re applying for as well as your individual needs. So take time to explore each resume writing format before deciding which is best suited for you.

1. A Chronological Resume

A chronological resume is a type of resume that lists out an individual’s professional experience in reverse-chronological order, starting with their most recent role. It includes information such as the job title, employers, and dates worked for each position. Typically it will also include contact details, objective or summary statement outlining relevant skillset/experience, and education history at the top of the page.

Chronological resumes are ideal for people whose employment has been steady over time showing progression from one more role to another. However, if you have multiple gaps in your work history or looking to switch careers then a functional or combination-based format may be better suited instead.

2. Functional Resume

A Functional Resume is a type of resume that emphasizes your transferable skills and experience rather than the chronological order of your work history. It typically includes: 

  • Your contact information.
  • An objective or summary statement.
  • A list of key skill areas relevant to the job you are applying for. 
  • Details around past employment (while not always necessary). 
  • Education/training qualifications attained in relation to this specific position. 
  • Additional information which may be useful such as volunteer projects completed or special interests related to the role being applied for.

If you have multiple job gaps, are changing careers with little relevant industry experience, or coming back to work after an extended break, then the functional resume is best.

3. Combination Resume

The combination resume is a type of resume that combines the features and format elements from both chronological and functional resumes. It includes: 

  • An objective or summary statement to explain your qualifications for the job in question.
  • Details about relevant work experience such as employer name, position titles held, and dates employed.
  • Followed by a skills section that summarises any abilities you have pertinent to the role.
  • Educational background.

This particular style allows flexibility when deciding how best to present yourself depending on what you think is more important to emphasize for employers. Whether it’s your job history or some specific capabilities/qualifications. Applicants should consider job posting hints to determine desired qualities for the next employee, before creating a hybrid-format document.

What Is the Best Resume Format for Freshers?

If you are a recent or soon-to-be graduate, you may be wondering what is the best resume format for freshers or someone with limited work experience. Focus on your education and knowledge gained through school by providing detailed information about courses taken and topics covered in them. Emphasize the most valuable parts of what you have learned to demonstrate how they apply to the job role.

When creating an effective fresher’s resume, make it short (under one page) yet accurate enough that hiring managers can get a comprehensive understanding of your background from reading it. The type of resume should depend upon individual circumstances as well as requirements listed on job postings. Tailor yours accordingly so its content stands out.

Rules and Elements for Formatting a Professional Resume

Once you’ve chosen the right resume format for you, focus on structuring it properly. It’s important to consider certain elements that are essential in the organization of your resume. They include:

1. Use the Right margins

Margins for professional documents such as resumes or cover letters should be one inch all around. However, if the resume has a lot of empty space you can opt for wider margins but make sure they do not go beyond 1.5 inches in any direction. Lastly, aligning portions left-aligned ensures easy reading while centering certain sections like headers adds some style without sacrificing readability.

2. Use a Professional Font Type

When choosing a font for your resume, it is important to use one that is easy to read and professional-looking. Sans serif fonts like Avenir, Calibri, Gothic Garamond, Georgia Gill Sans, or Helvetica are widely accepted by employers and should be used when possible.

3. Use Readable Font Sizes

In order to make your written content readable, it is important to set an appropriate font size. Generally speaking, this should be between 10 and 12 points, but anything greater could appear unprofessional. If there is a lot of information then start with 10 points and increase as needed. However, avoid reducing the size further than that in order to prevent it from going over one page.

4. Short Length

Keep your resume length to two pages at most. If you are in the early stages of your career, one page may be enough. For every 10 years’ worth of experience that you have, add an extra page; however, don’t exceed 20 years of work history on your resume.

5. Be Consistent

The key to a professional and readable resume is consistency. Once you have chosen your formatting style, use it for all elements within the document such as fonts and date formats. By doing this, you will ensure that readers understand what they are looking at easily without needing any extra explanation or deciphering of different styles used.

6. Emphasize Headers

Bolding, underlining, or increasing the font size of feature section headers can make it easier for employers to quickly find what they are looking for on a resume. Differentiation between these headers and body text needs to be kept professional. Proper stylizing techniques include using ‘bold’ fonts, 12-16 point header fonts, and/or underlining them in addition to applying similar treatments when styling your name and contact information at the top of your CV.

7. Use Bullet Points

Bullet points make it easier for employers to pick out relevant pieces of information from your background. Use bullet points when listing achievements. Avoid using one or two bullet points; instead either list the words in sentence form with other punctuation or don’t use them at all if there are less than three ideas.

8. Get Feedback

After you have completed your resume, it can be beneficial to get another person’s opinion on the format and content. Ask them to look for errors in grammar or spelling as well as readability, consistency, and a professional appearance overall.

It’s essential to find the right resume format when applying for a job. Three popular choices are chronological, functional, and combination formats which offer different advantages based on your career path or goals. Furthermore, it is important that all formatting elements such as margins & font type match in order make an attractive document that can be easily read by recruiters. Keep it concise with headers/bullet points where appropriate too.

Also Read: How to Write Educational Qualification in a Resume .

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5 functional resumes are best suited for

Shailja Kaushik has been an Editor with Internshala since March 2023. She loves creative writing and experimenting with different forms of writing. She has explored different genres by working with journals and radio stations. She has also published her poems and nano tales in various anthologies. She graduated at the top of her class with Bachelor's in English and recently completed her Master's in English from the University of Delhi. Her experiments with writing continue on her literary blog.

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    Essentially, there are 5 different types of resumes based on the formats and the industry, and learning about them can help you make a more informed decision as to which type of resume is best suited for your needs and situation. The 5 different types of resumes are - chronological, functional, combination, infographic, and targeted resume.

  2. What Is a Functional Resume? Template, Examples, & Tips

    A functional resume is the best solution for you if you're switching careers, have employment gaps, or just graduated with not much work experience. Thanks to the functional resume format, you can effectively deal with a winding work history. And it's easier to write than you think!

  3. Functional Resume: A Beginner's Guide with Examples

    Contents Why Choose a Functional Resume Benefits of a Functional Resume Anatomy of a Functional Resume When to Use a Functional Resume Preparing to Write a Functional Resume Writing a Successful Functional Resume Examples of Functional Resumes A functional resume focuses on a candidate's skills and accomplishments rather than their work experience.

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    2. Add a professional summary. Below your contact information, write a 3-5 sentence professional summary. Consider this your highlight reel—zeroing in on top achievements, skills, and qualifications while generating enough interest to keep the hiring manager or recruiter reading the rest of your resume.

  5. How to Write a Functional Resume with Examples

    Guide Overview Functional resume: What it is and how to write one Knowing which type of resume to write to best highlight your skills and experience is key to presenting yourself in the most attractive way possible to potential employers. There are a few primary types of resumes that job seekers use, with a functional resume being one of them.

  6. Functional Resume: Definition, Tips and Examples

    Combination The mix of chronological and functional resumes results in the "combination" resume. Skills and abilities are listed first, followed by chronological experience. This resume format is good for emphasizing specific skills and abilities of professionals with diverse backgrounds and creative applicants like designers or artists.

  7. How to Write a Functional Resume & When to Use One

    While the chronological resume is ideal for persons with few gaps in professional experience, a functional one is often better suited for individuals with such employment gaps. The functional resume shifts the emphasis from job titles to the applicant's skills. When to Use a Functional Resume Job seekers can choose among several resume formats.

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    1. What Is a Functional Resume? ‍2. What Is the Functional Resume Structure? 1. Contact Information 2. Resume Summary 3. Skills Section ‍4. Professional Skills ‍5. Work Experience, If Any ‍6. Education ‍3. Who Should Use a Functional Resume? ‍4. Functional Resume VS Chronological Resume? 5. Functional Resume VS Combination Resume? Conclusion

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    Looking to emphasize your skills rather than your career progression? The functional resume format is the ideal choice for you. If you're a career changer, a job seeker with employment gaps, or someone with a highly developed skill set, the functional resume format gives you the best chance to impress hiring managers.

  10. How to Write a Functional Resume

    A functional resume can be used for a variety of candidates but is best suited for those who have work histories that don't directly relate to their desired job going forward. Additionally, functional resumes might be beneficial for those who have employment gaps or are trying to make a transition into a new industry or career path.

  11. How to Write a Functional Resume

    Functional resumes are best for applicants who'd like to highlight their skills as opposed to the jobs they've held. If you have job hopped, been out of work for a while, lack experience, or if you're entering a different field, this resume format will place emphasis on your transferable skills and other useful attributes, like education.

  12. The 6 Types of Resumes (+ Which One Fits You Best)

    1. Chronological resume The most common (and most preferred) resume format is the chronological resume. As its name suggests, this resume lays out your work experience in reverse chronological order. Meaning your most recent job takes the top spot, and the rest follow in descending order.

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    Skills section. In a functional format, the skills section will be at the top of the page and should take up the largest part of the resume. This section is a summary of a job seeker's key skills. When you write your skills section, you should consider the job description you are applying for and try to mirror the keywords it uses.

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    The Three Common Resume Formats: 1. Reverse chronological format. By far the most used resume format. This format presents work experience or qualification from most recent to oldest. It is the most common resume format. The layout makes its easy for a recruiter to get a fast first impression of your history.

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    - CareerNewton Resume Formats Is a Functional Resume Format the Right Choice for You? Look no further than our functional resume format. Our easy-to-use format makes it easy for you to showcase your skills and experience in a clear, concise manner.

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    2. Use a Professional Font Type. When choosing a font for your resume, it is important to use one that is easy to read and professional-looking. Sans serif fonts like Avenir, Calibri, Gothic Garamond, Georgia Gill Sans, or Helvetica are widely accepted by employers and should be used when possible. 3.

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