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education requirements to be a grant writer

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EDUCATION CAREER GUIDES

Grant Writer Career

What is a grant writer.

A grant writer identifies grant opportunities, writes and polishes complete grant proposals, and submits those proposals for review. They maintain responsibility for most stages of the grant application process, managing grant proposals from initial creation stages through submission.

Grant writers typically require an undergraduate degree to be considered for hire. An advanced degree can help set you apart from the competition even more. In addition, some employers might prefer grant writers with experience in a grant writing setting.

education requirements to be a grant writer

RESPONSIBILITIES

What Does a Grant Writer Do?

Grant writers focus most of their attention on writing, revising, and submitting grant proposals throughout the year. They will also assist in identifying new grant opportunities, and can answer follow-up questions from government agencies issuing the grants.

The exact responsibilities of a grant writer can include:

  • Identifying grant opportunities  in your local community and beyond.
  • Communicating with government agencies , private trusts, and other organizations issuing grants.
  • Writing grant proposals  according to grant requirements.
  • Revising grant proposals  to create a polished, final version.
  • Submitting grant proposals  before grant deadlines.
  • I nforming executives and stakeholders  about potential grant opportunities.
  • Collecting and submitting supportive documents  that help strengthen an organization’s case for receiving a grant.

These and other responsibilities keep grant writers busy, even when there are no proposals to be written.

EDUCATION & BEST DEGREES

What education does a grant writer need, before you can gain employment as a grant writer, you’ll need to complete a few educational requirements. first, you’ll need to obtain an undergraduate degree in a writing field or  educational studies , programs that teaches you the basics of composition, revision, style, and tone. these skills will help you craft authoritative grant proposals in a professional setting..

A  master’s in educational leadership  can help to improve your chances of getting a good grant writer job or improve your salary if you’re already working as a grant writer. This degree can give you the understanding of modern education and curriculum standards necessary to write compelling grant proposals.

Completing your education can make you eligible to apply for  school administration jobs , where grant writers can help connect teachers, and entire departments, with valuable resources. To be fully eligible for an education-based grant writing position, you may also need to obtain a bachelor’s degree in an academic field.

education requirements to be a grant writer

Best Degrees for a Grant Writer

These online, non-licensure educational studies degrees prepare you to...

These online, non-licensure educational studies degrees prepare you to make a difference in a field that interests you.

Based on your career goals and interests, you can choose an educational studies program in one of 10 content areas that meets your needs while working toward employment in school settings, corporate training, or instructional design. These programs do not lead to a teaching license.

  • Time:  Completion time varies depending on the specialty track you choose.
  • Tuition:  $3,825 per 6-month term.
  • This bachelor's degree allows students to learn about education but does not include student teaching and it does not lead to a teaching license.

Focus areas of this educational studies degree program include:

  • Elementary Education
  • Elementary and Special Education
  • Mild to Moderate Special Education
  • Secondary Biology Science Education
  • Secondary Chemistry Science Education
  • Secondary Earth Science Education
  • Secondary Physics Education
  • Middle Grades Science Education
  • Secondary Mathematics Education
  • Middle Grade Mathematics Education

Students in this program will be prepared for careers including:

  • Instructional support
  • Community outreach
  • Education staff (museums, learning centers, etc.) 
  • K-12 opportunities that do not require a teaching license

An online master's degree for current teachers looking to move into a...

An online master's degree for current teachers looking to move into a school or district leadership position, like principal, vice principal, or administrator.

  • Time:  61% of grads earned this degree within 21 months.
  • Tuition: $3,975 per 6-month term.
  • Courses: 13 total courses in this program.

This program is for licensed teachers who are ready to take the next step in their education career.

Graduates of this program are prepared for careers in a variety of places, including:

  • Elementary schools
  • Middle schools
  • Junior high schools
  • High schools
  • Private and charter schools
  • District-level positions

Put your leadership skills to good use—in the service of America's children—with this education master's degree. 

States that do not accept this program: Alabama, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, and Minnesota.

education requirements to be a grant writer

How Much Does a Grant Writer Make?

The exact income of a grant writer can vary based on several different factors, including your employer, employer’s location, employer’s private or public funding, education, and years of experience. On average, the  salary of a grant writer  is $49,226, with a range of roughly $37,000 to $70,000 earned each year.

education requirements to be a grant writer

What Is the Projected Job Growth?

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics counts grant writers among other types of writers and authors when determining job outlook. From 2019 to 2029,  employment for authors and writers is expected to decline by 2% . Grant writers will need to actively adapt to improvements in writing technology. As a grant writer, the use of new writing tools, revisions applications, and grant submission programs will likely be an ongoing responsibility.

What Skills Does a Grant Writer Need?

Grant writers depend on well-developed skill sets to help them thrive in a variety of professional environments. These skills help them communicate effectively, both verbally and through written grant proposals.

The exact skills a grant writer needs can include:

  • Grant writing.  The ability to draft grant proposals according to exact proposal requirements.
  • Revision.  The ability to revise grant proposals according to style and tone best practices, suggestions from others, and proposal parameters.
  • Time management.  The ability to complete tasks well before deadlines by allocating appropriate amounts of time to grant writing, revision, and submission tasks.
  • Research.  The ability to identify new grant opportunities by utilizing search engines and local resources.
  • Ongoing education.  The ability to continually pursue improved grant writing skills, specifically through  teaching and professional development courses .
  • Interpersonal communication.  The ability to correspond effectively with other grant writers, organizational representatives, and any other individuals involved in the grant application process.
  • Technological proficiency.  The ability to fully use all necessary pieces of technology, including computers, tablets, phones, online programs, and grant submission portals.
  • Perseverance.  The ability to persist through grant rejections and unfulfilled applications, to eventually connect your organization with grant funding that enables specific projects.

These and other skills make grant writers crucial to the success of many nonprofit organizations and charities, which depend on grant funding for continued operations.

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Guide to Becoming a Grant Writer: Expert Advice From Seasoned Professionals

Reviewed by:

September 28, 2021

Last Updated:

December 18, 2023

Table of Contents

Are you interested in pursuing a rewarding career as a grant writer?

As more nonprofits strive to make a meaningful difference in the world, demand for skilled grant writers who play an important role in securing funding has risen in tandem.

This grant writing for beginners guide is your roadmap on how to become a grant writer, packed with information on:

  • Building your grant writer skill set
  • How to find grant writing jobs
  • Writing an effective grant proposal

With tips and direct advice from industry experts, this article demystifies the process and qualifications needed to become a successful grant writer.

Let’s dive in.

10 best lessons from grant writing experts

The Path to Becoming a Grant Writer

A career in grant writing isn't just about getting a job; it's about making a real difference.

By becoming a grant writer, you contribute to meaningful projects that make a positive impact on society. You can find purpose and satisfaction in your work beyond just a paycheck.

But that doesn’t mean a career in grant writing can’t be lucrative: In 2023, the average grant writing salary stood at $73,772, varying between $66,238 and $82,981, as reported by Salary.com .

Grant writing also opens doors to diverse sectors, allowing you to explore areas aligned with your passions.

How to Become a Grant Writer—Steps at a Glimpse

If you’re ready to start your journey toward becoming a grant writer , you’re in the right spot. Here’s a quick overview of the steps for how to become a grant writer that we will cover in this comprehensive guide:

  • Understand the Grant Writing Profession
  • Build Your Grant Writer Skill Set
  • Gain Practical Experience
  • Network and Seek Guidance
  • Write Your First Grant Proposal

We’ve also collected highly valuable tips and advice from nearly a dozen grant-writing experts that we are excited to share with you. Their insights and best practices will give you an edge and a head start in your grant writing career.

Step 1: Understanding the Grant Writing Profession

The first step in becoming a grant writer involves gaining a deep understanding of the grant writing profession .

So what does a grant writer do?

In general, grant writers are responsible for crafting winning grant proposals for nonprofit organizations. ‍

Every year, thousands of foundations, government agencies, and even corporations offer funding opportunities that nonprofits can apply for via grant proposals. The goal of these proposals—which are written by experienced grant writers—is to convince funders why their project or program deserves to be funded.

The Importance of Research

However, a grant writer’s job involves more than just writing; they have to be skilled researchers as well . Professional grant writers are often responsible for:

  • Researching and finding open grant opportunities
  • Identifying if a funder is a good fit
  • Researching a funder’s past giving history
  • Keeping track of funder-specific guidelines and requirements

Grants are extremely competitive, which is why grant writers have to be skilled researchers to determine whether a particular funding opportunity is worth pursuing—and if so, how to tailor their proposals to the specific funder.

As Matt Hugh, President and Founder of Nonprofit Courses, suggests, successful grant writers “look at everything from the funder's point of view.”

Ultimately, grant research requires understanding the needs of the nonprofit organization, aligning them with the goals of potential funders, and ensuring a perfect match.

Pro Tip: Grant writers can access comprehensive and detailed funder profiles in Instrumentl . Everything from past giving histories to funding preferences is available in one place.

Financials on funders in Instrumentl

The Importance of Genuine Passion

It’s also important for grant writers to have a sincere passion for the mission of the nonprofit they are writing for .

To add authenticity to their proposals, grant writers need to know more than just the different components of a grant proposal . They must have a deep understanding of the organization’s programming, goals, and vision for the future.

Grant writing expert and President of KM Clark Consulting Group, Kristina Clark puts it this way: ‍

“Grant writing is one part process and one part expertise in the subject matter you are writing for.”

Think of grant writers as storytellers who translate complex ideas into compelling narratives that resonate with funders. Ultimately, passion fueled with expertise in the subject is a guaranteed recipe for grant writing success.

For more insights into the grant writing profession, check out this helpful grant writing basics guide —11 things you need to know.

Click to find the best grants for your nonprofit from 12,000+ active opportunities.

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Step 2: Building Your Grant Writer Skill Set

One of the most important steps in your grant writer journey is building a grant writing skill set.

Founder and CEO of Think and Ink Grant Consulting Shavonn Richardson explains that to be successful in grant writing, you need to ‘’be the master of your trade”.

So how can you do that? Let’s start by exploring some of the essential skills necessary for grant writing.

Essential Skills for Grant Writing

  • Effective Communication: Grant writers need to have good communication skills to be able to craft clear and persuasive narratives.
  • Attention to Detail: Grant writers must keep detailed track of funder requirements, proposal guidelines, submission deadlines, and more.
  • Research Acumen: As we explained earlier, grant writers need to be skilled researchers to identify funding opportunities and tailor their grant proposals accordingly.
  • Project Management: Grant writers should also be good at managing multiple grants at a time and understanding the ins and outs of the projects they are writing about.
  • Strategic Thinking: Grant writers need to be able to take complex ideas and craft them into compelling and persuasive narratives.

If you’re not an expert in some of these skills yet, no worries! There are tons of resources out there that are specifically designed with beginner grant writers in mind. Keep reading to explore a few of the top resources that can help you develop your grant writing skills.

Resources for Skill Development

  • Online Courses: Grant writing courses are a great way to learn about the fundamentals of grant writing while building your skill set at the same time! Check out this curated list of top grant writing courses to find the right one for you.
  • Workshops and Webinars: Grant writing workshops and webinars are perfect for beginner and seasoned grant writers alike! Attend free, on-line workshops for hands-on learning.
  • Podcasts: Have a busy schedule? Grant writing podcasts are a great way to learn from industry experts while on the go!
  • Books and Industry Publications: You can learn from the best (and at your own pace) by reading grant-writing books written by industry experts.
  • Other Grant Proposals: Looking over existing grant proposal examples and samples can show you what a winning proposal looks like.
  • Networking: As with any industry, connecting with experts in the field is a great way to grow in the profession and learn from their experience and insights.
  • Practice: Grant writing practice prompts and worksheets give you the opportunity to create sample proposals to help refine your skills.

With plenty of grant writing resources to choose from, you’re sure to find something that will help you develop your skills and become proficient in the field.

Step 3: Gaining Practical Experience

Once you’ve established your grant writing skill set, the next step on your grant writer journey should be to gain practical experience .

While grant writing skills are vital, practical experience distinguishes an adept grant writer.

Here are some ideas for how you can gain grant writing experience:

  • Volunteer Opportunities: Consider offering your skills to nonprofits seeking grant writing assistance. Local community organizations often welcome volunteers.
  • Internships: Seek internships with nonprofit organizations, foundations, or even local government agencies. This could provide firsthand exposure to the grant writing process.
  • Freelance Work: Explore freelance opportunities to work on diverse projects. Websites like Upwork and Freelancer connect grant writers with organizations in need.

Gaining experience will likely help boost your resume, increase your earning potential, and strengthen your credibility in the field. Often, once you have that first big break, other doors will open—so don’t be afraid to put yourself out there.

As grant expert and Founder and Principal of Burrows Consulting LLC, Elizabeth Morgan Burrows, advises, “Just start! You know what to do!”

Step 4: Networking and Seeking Guidance

Not sure where to start? Keep reading for some tips on how you can start establishing connections.

Tips on Building a Professional Network

Join Online Communities: Engage in grant writing forums and associations, such as:

  • Grant Professionals Association (GPA)
  • Grants.gov’s Community Blog
  • Grant Writing Resources (Facebook)
  • Grant Writers Association (LinkedIn)
  • Grant Writing Group (Facebook)

education requirements to be a grant writer

We have some exciting news to share! Instrumentl is working on creating a special place on the web where you can connect with your peers, access exclusive content, ask questions, share what you know, and more. Secure your spot on the waitlist to enjoy exclusive early access privileges when the community officially launches.

Attend Conferences and Workshops: Connect with professionals in person and stay updated on industry trends by attending conferences and workshops—like Instrumentl’s live grant writing classes .

‍ Seek Mentorship : Seek guidance from experienced grant writers through mentorship opportunities. Don’t be afraid to ask more seasoned grant writers for advice and insight.

‍ Connect with Funders: Building relationships with funders can increase your chances of grant success and can open doors to new funding opportunities. Consider inviting funders to your organization’s events so they can see the impact of your mission firsthand. Check out our webinar with Scot Scala, GPC, M.Ed., and GPA Approved Trainer, for more strategies for building relationships with funders .

Step 5: Writing Your First Grant Proposal

Writing your first grant proposal can seem intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be!

We are going to break down the process of writing a compelling grant proposal and seeking feedback from funders.

Basic Components of a Grant Proposal

As a quick reminder, a grant proposal is a structured document used to request financial support from a funder. While every grant proposal will look different, there are some standard elements you’ll find that almost every funder requests:

  • Executive Summary: An executive summary is a brief overview of your entire proposal. It should be short and aimed at captivating the reader's interest.
  • Organization Overview: Grant funders may not be familiar with your organization, so you typically want to include an organization overview in your proposal that includes your mission, brief organizational history, and context for the project you’re proposing.
  • Statement of Need: Every grant proposal will have a needs statement , or an explanation of why funding is necessary/ what need will be met with it. It’s important to clearly articulate the problem your project aims to address, creating a compelling case for intervention. Most statement of needs include relevant research and data to back up their claims.
  • Goals and Objectives: The best grant proposals have clear goals and objectives outlined. This shows funders you have thought strategically about what sort of outcomes you are hoping to achieve. Dr. Bev Browning, author of Grant Writing for Dummies, suggests using SMART goals to strengthen grant proposals and make them more compelling to funders.
  • ‍ Proposal Narrative: The proposal narrative is the bulk of your grant proposal. It’s where you outline your proposed project or program in detail and explain the methods and strategies you'll employ to execute it effectively. The proposal narrative is your opportunity to convince the funders why your organization deserves funding and how their support would make an impact in your community.
  • ‍ Grant Budget: Funders also require detailed budgets that outline how the grant will be spent. This ensures transparency and clarity in how you plan to allocate the funding to achieve your project’s goals. In his workshop, "Behind the Grantmaker’s Curtain: What Funders Want" , grant expert Matt Hugg advises using thoughtful budget narratives , realistic figures, and adhering closely to funder guidelines. ‍
  • Evaluation Section: Many proposals also include evaluation plans where you get the opportunity to explain how you'll track and measure the success of your project. You should be able to clearly articulate what specific metrics you will use for your evaluation. ‍
  • Other Funding Sources and Sustainability Plan: Grantmakers often prefer to fund projects that will continue even after the grant runs out. You can demonstrate a strategic approach in your proposal by mentioning additional funding sources and outlining sustainability plans.

Grant Proposal Best Practices

Beyond the basic elements, there are some best practices you can implement to make your grant proposal really stand out. Let’s explore a few:

  • Understand the Funder’s Priorities: We’ve mentioned this once but it’s worth repeating. Grantmakers have their own missions and funding priorities. The most successful grant proposals align and resonate with a funder’s philanthropic goals. Jacob B. Chase, CEO of Chase Consulting Solutions, emphasizes how important it is to research potential funders as it will help you better understand what they are looking for in a proposal:
“Investigate the funder's previous grantees, values, and mission statement. Understand their objectives, target audience, and the types of projects they typically support. This information will help you align your proposal with their goals. Be sure to customize your proposal to address the specific values highlighted by the funder.” ‍
  • Focus on Clarity: One of the best ways to write a compelling grant proposal is to shorten your writing style. It’s important to remember that funders aren’t as familiar with your nonprofit as you are. They also usually aren’t interested in reading long-winded and overly detailed explanations. Founder and CEO of Thread Strategies , Loree Lipstein emphasizes this:
“Length matters, and short and snappy is more effective than long and thorough. There is a human on the other end of your grant application, and you should be thinking about how humans take in information quickly and easily.” 
  • Seek Feedback: Seeking outside feedback is a great way to strengthen your grant proposal and check for any inconsistencies or errors. You can share your proposal with colleagues or fellow grant writers and ask for their input. Be open to their suggestions and revise your proposal as necessary.
  • ‍ ‍ Seek Funder Feedback: If your proposal is rejected , don’t forget that you can ask for funder feedback as well! In her workshop, "Funder Feedback: Ask the Right Way – to Get the Right Results" Maryn Boess highlights the significance of framing questions with an open mindset. She advises asking constructive questions that are focused on improvement as it can increase the chances of meaningful feedback from funders.

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education requirements to be a grant writer

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FAQ on Becoming a Grant Writer

What degree do you need to become a grant writer.

Having a Bachelor’s Degree is often necessary to become a grant writer and degrees in English, Journalism, Marketing, Communications, Nonprofit Management, or Creative Writing—while not necessary—can give you a leg up. Check job sites like Indeed for more specific job insights.

What Skills and Qualifications Help You Become a Good Grant Writer?

General computer proficiency, adept research capabilities, strong writing skills, multitasking abilities, and effective data management are universally beneficial skills and qualifications for grant writing. While soft skills like being detail-oriented and good communication are crucial, familiarity with software like Microsoft Excel is also important.

What Are Good Grant Writing Classes or Resources to Check Out?

While entering grant writing with little to no experience is possible, completing courses and certifications can significantly advance your career. Grant writing trainings from the American Grant Writers’ Association, GrantsMagicU , and Instrumentl can be valuable resources. This guide can help you determine whether a grant writing certification is worth it for you.

What Professional Associations Are Valuable to Grant Writers?

While not mandatory, joining professional associations can enhance your training opportunities and facilitate networking opportunities with other grant writers. Esteemed organizations like the American Grant Writers Association and the Grant Professionals Association provide valuable resources and support and their memberships can aid in finding your first grant writing job and building experience.

How Do You Find Grant Writing Jobs?

Being a part of grant writing associations, attending relevant conferences, and searching for jobs on regular job sites like Indeed , Glassdoor , and others can help you find grant writing jobs.

While local or regional nonprofit membership groups might share job postings, volunteer work and building relationships can also lead to job opportunities. Checking the websites of organizations you are interested in working with and consulting local employment agencies are also effective methods.

Can Grant Writing Be a Side Hustle?

Freelance grant writing offers numerous opportunities, making it a viable side hustle. Platforms like Upwork regularly list freelance grant writing positions. Clarity about your availability from the start is crucial, especially if you intend for it to be an after-hours side hustle. While grant writing can be a great way to earn extra income, it requires a serious commitment, as nonprofits rely on grants to operate.

Are Freelance Grant Writers in Demand?

Yes, freelance grant writers are in demand. Many nonprofits can’t afford to have a full-time grant writer on their staff, so they will often outsource their grant writing projects to freelancers.

How Do You Break into Grant Writing?

You break into grant writing just as you do any industry—just by doing it! You can take the classes , seminars, and certifications, but at the end of the day, you simply need to start applying.

Volunteering for a nonprofit, leveraging personal networks, joining professional organizations, offering pro bono services, or applying directly for positions are various avenues to gain experience.

What Do Successful Grant Writers Tend to Do that Sets Them Apart?

Successful grant writers are talented storytellers , able to distill an organization’s mission, vision, values, and impact into compelling narratives. Knowledge in areas like budgeting and fundraising can enhance their value. The stronger an asset you can make yourself be to the nonprofit, the more you will stand out from others in the field.

Wrapping Up: Guide to Becoming a Grant Writer

Whether you're drawn to the meaningful career opportunity, the prospect of skill development, or the varied opportunities in different sectors, becoming a grant writer can be quite rewarding.

In this guide, we have walked you through how to become a grant writer that succeeds. Though it may seem difficult at first , the insights and tips shared by experts should help you become a skilled and efficient grant writer in no time.

Remember that successful grant writing is not just about obtaining a job; it's about translating an organization's mission into a compelling narrative. With the right skills, practical experience, and a robust network, you can pave the way for a fulfilling and impactful career in grant writing.

education requirements to be a grant writer

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Instrumentl is the all-in-one grant management tool for nonprofits and consultants who want to find and win more grants without the stress of juggling grant work through disparate tools and sticky notes.

Become a Stronger Grant Writer in Just 5 Minutes

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These days, it feels like Artificial Intelligence (AI) is everywhere. We spoke to four industry experts to learn how they are—or are not—using AI to support their grant-seeking efforts.

How to Make Your Letter of Inquiry Stand Out To Funders

Learn how to write compelling Letters of Inquiry (LOIs) with practical advice from grant experts. Discover essential tips from recorded events with Arnisha Johnson and Margit Brazda Poirier to increase your chances of success in securing funding for your nonprofit.

These Grant Writers Raised Millions: Tactics They Swear By To Win Over Funders

Unlock the secrets to becoming a game-changing grants professional with insights from industry experts who have secured millions in funding. Learn from their years of experience.

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education requirements to be a grant writer

  • July 30, 2022
  • Career Advice

How to Become a Grant Writer: Education, Skills, Salary

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Not everyone finds the idea of writing for a living exciting and compelling. However, those who do, try to find a career where writing is one of the main requirements for the job. Grant writing is one of the careers in which you won’t only use your passion for writing, but also, you’ll be able to change lives by writing grant proposals that serve a good cause.

Keep reading if you’re looking for an answer to the question “How to become a grant writer?” and learn more about this profession.

What Is Grant Writing?

Grant writing is the profession in which an individual writes to organizations on behalf of others, asking for monetary funding. What does this mean, you may ask? It implies that grant writers compose proposals on behalf of profit and nonprofit organizations to apply for grants from governmental or non-governmental agencies or organizations.

While the title might suggest a heavy emphasis on the writing aspect, a grant writer’s job is much more than that. They’re responsible for every part of the grant writing process—starting with the thorough research on the grant itself, meeting project deadlines, and collecting information about the application process.

Why is it good to become a grant writer?

If you want to learn how to become a grant writer, you probably want to make a difference in your community or help society in general. Grant writing is fulfilling because you are assisting groups that provide critical services such as homeless shelters, free medical treatment, and aid to single mothers, among other things.

Moreover, a grant writer connects with nonprofits, small businesses, and individuals who need assistance in making their goals a reality. When you utilize your skills and experience to assist a client looking for a grant, you increase their possibilities of getting the funds they require for their cause. Nothing beats the satisfaction of watching your client receive the money they need.

Another great benefit that comes with this job is creating strong networking relationships. A career as a grant writer allows you to meet and network with various organizations that provide different services. As a grant writer, you can locate a position with a specific organization about which you are enthusiastic and assist them in making a difference using your work.

As a grant writer, you need to learn continuously. Since research is the most significant aspect of grant writing, continuous learning is essential. First and foremost, you must educate yourself on what a nonprofit organization is and how it operates. Moreover, you need to know a lot about the people you work with. It’s essential to understand the people or locations the nonprofit assists so you can translate everything you learn into why a funder would want to provide money to that organization. Understanding the people in charge, what they do daily, and the nonprofit’s goals is also critical.

In addition, grant writing may be a good fit if you like flexibility and creating your schedule since you can work from home, giving you greater freedom and flexibility than in a regular workplace.

Finally, once you’ve established a reputation as a grant writer and gained enough experience, you may earn satisfactory salaries since you can set the amount of work you complete based on how much money you want to make. When it comes to earning, the average wage for a grant writer is $59,987 annually in the United States.

How to Become a Grant Writer?

Like any ordinary job position out there, grant writing has its requirements. They’re not too many and we’re going to go more in-depth about each of them right now.

Educational requirements

A prospective grant writer should have a certain level of education. All those that see themselves as future grant writers can become one with the condition they have a Bachelor’s degree in their hands. The study field isn’t that relevant to the job. However, a degree in English Language, Marketing, or Government Contract Management is an advantage towards your journey to becoming a grant writer.

Key skills of a grant writer

You may be wondering what makes a grant writer good at his job. Well, wonder no longer. The secret is having the right combination of social and technical skills. By all means, you’ll need to know the whats and hows of the job while also being an excellent communicator with your potential clients and staff members if you have any. The lack of one of the skills could jeopardize your grant writing career.

Research is an essential part of the whole grant writing process. Firstly, a grant writer needs to get informed on what grants are available to apply for. They do so by conducting thorough research on all the grants out there. Afterward, they make a list of the grants their client qualifies for and have more chances of receiving. After they find the right grant for their organization, grant writers prepare a proposal in which all the information required by the funding body is included. Through a grant proposal, they try to convince the grant-giving agency that their organization deserves to receive the funds.

In case of a successful proposal— the organization gets the funding that they asked for—it’s the duty of the grant writer to make sure that it’s spent for the designated purpose.

Organization and efficiency

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Grant writers usually deal with more than one project and client at a time. That’s why at times you can be at risk of running late to submit the grant applications or forgetting altogether. However, those who think of pursuing this career need to make sure they can handle the ever-present pressure and stress that characterizes this job.

One of the keys to being a successful grant writer is to learn to be on top of the tasks that need to be finished. You can use any system that suits you best to keep track of what needs to be completed and when. The system can be a digital spreadsheet or a dry erase board. You need to make sure that there’s enough time to focus on each one of the grant projects you have taken upon. Here are some other key skills you need to succeed in the field.

Writing skills

The job wouldn’t be called grant writing if one of the primary skills a potential candidate should have wouldn’t be writing itself. Don’t take this as a message that you have to be one of the best writers out there because this isn’t how this works. Still, you need to master enough of this skill so that you know how to express your case clearly, logically, and succinctly to the grant board.

Surely, not all people can do what this job requires. However, if an individual has doubts about whether this career path is the right one for them or not, it’s the writing skills that have the final say on the matter.  If the thought of writing makes you feel stressed and anxious, then maybe you should go for a job where writing doesn’t play this big of a role in the job’s success.

Interpersonal skills

Despite the fact that most of this job consists of doing research and writing, that doesn’t mean that some social skills won’t be of use. You’ll need to talk to plenty of people throughout work. Starting from the people who work at the government body, which you want to convince to give you the grant, staff members with which you coordinate over the detail and information that needs to be included on the proposal and the clients for whom you’re trying to get the grant. It’s not like you’re always going to be having conversations with people, but having those skills will certainly make your job easier.

Salary of a Grant Writer  

A grant writer’s income depends on whether they have an employment contract or are self-employed, on the educational background, certificates earned, and on the job experience. Contractually employed people with a few years of experience on the professional level can get paid annually from $48,331 to $114,930 , according to the Bureau of Labour Statistics .

However, there’s hope for everyone, as the better you become at this job and the more proposals you can squeeze in your schedule, the more you’re going to earn. If you’re a quick researcher and writer and bring results to your clients, you can get paid up to $100 per hour. However, a beginner on the job in their first years earns from $40 to $60 per hour .

Grant writing is a gratifying career, not only financially but also morally. You’re not the only one that benefits from the job. You’ll help many organizations to earn funding that will potentially help to give back to the community. This job mixes writing with philanthropy—two passions which if you have, then this job is the right one for you.

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Grant Writing 101: What is it & how do you get started?

Have you been thrown into the deep end working at a nonprofit organization and tasked to apply for grant funding for the first time? Maybe you've heard about the field, catching the buzz from a friend starting a grant writing side hustle . Or you've seen how others have pivoted their careers to launch grant writing consultant businesses.

However you found grant writing, we're glad you're here!

Grant writers are perceived to have superpowers—they know how to get free money!

Well, it's not quite that easy. There is no such thing as free money, and grant writing is a lot of hard work.

However, it is very learnable and an incredible skill set to have in your quiver. Even newcomers succeed with the right guidance and training under their belt.

This crash course in grant writing will cover everything you need to know to start approaching grant writing like a boss!

Grant Writing Essentials: Definitions & FAQs

  • Grant Writing vs. Nonprofit Fundraising

The Grant Writing Process for Beginners

Understanding the grant fundraising landscape, why grant writing is such a valuable skill.

Curious about how to get into grant writing without prior experience? Check out this video to learn more.

Let’s start with the essentials: a few grant writing definitions and frequently asked questions.

What is grant writing?

Grant writing is the process of crafting a written proposal to receive grant funding from a grant making institution in order to fund a program or project.

Grant writing involves laying out your case for why the grant will do the most good for you (or your project or organization). A stellar grant proposal will clearly show the funder that your plan is the best possible choice for accomplishing your shared goals.

Think of grant writing like making a pitch to investors or lenders but to receive funding that you won’t need to pay back.

That begs the question…

What are grants?

A grant is a financial award to support a person, organization, project, or program. It is intended to achieve a specific goal or purpose. Nonprofits can use grants to complete projects, run programs, provide services, or continue running a smooth operation.

Great, now where is all of this money coming from?

Who provides grant funding?

Typically, grants are awarded to organizations from grant making institutions (also called grantors ). These include foundations, corporations, and government agencies.

Grantors provide grants to help further their goals in their communities (or around the country or world) and to support other organizations that do on-the-ground work. These goals are typically philanthropic or social in nature, but grants might also be offered for educational, scientific, or any other purpose.

Grants usually come with very specific guidelines for what the money can and can’t be used for, as well as rules for how the “winner” of the grant (or the grantee ) will report on its progress. When a grant has specific guidelines, we call these funds restricted . Restricted funding means they can only be used for the purposes laid out in the proposal and specified by the funder.

So, can anybody and everybody get grant money?

Who is eligible for grant funding?

Many different types of organizations are eligible to write proposals and apply for grant funding. Most notably, 501(c) nonprofit organizations that have IRS Letters of Determination (basically any type of legit nonprofit).

More specifically, these types of organizations are eligible for grants through grant writing:

  • Nonprofits/public charities with IRS-recognized status
  • Unincorporated community groups with fiscal sponsors
  • Tribal organizations (and sometimes housing authorities)
  • Faith-based organizations (which sometimes must provide direct social services depending on the grantor’s guidelines)
  • Local governments

Exciting, right? Grants can do a lot of good for organizations of all sizes. But who’s doing the work?

Who does the actual grant writing and drafts the proposal?

All different kinds of folks! Each organization finds their sweet spot for getting the work done. Grant proposals can be written by:

  • Employees of eligible organizations
  • Volunteers lending their time
  • Freelance grant writers providing a contract-based service
  • Grant writing consultants who provide organizations with ongoing help through retainer contracts

Successful grant writing leads to positive impacts on real people and real communities. Grant writers put in the elbow grease because they care about charitable organizations and their missions. They want to see their communities thrive.

Is Grant Writing A Good Career For You?

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How do you learn grant writing?

Grant writing is a set of specific skills and processes, so it can be taught and learned like any other subject.

There are a few different avenues you can explore to level up your grant writing skills.

  • DIY Method: You can binge-watch YouTube content to pick up the bits and pieces of grant writing. This is certainly a cost-effective method! However, factoring in the stress of reinventing the wheel while riding the struggle bus of going it alone, you’re spending more time (and $$) in the long run to learn grant writing skills.
  • Higher-Ed Programs: Several universities offer certifications in nonprofit management, but most do not focus solely on grant writing. For a semester or two, the curriculum will teach you the ins and outs of nonprofit organizations, which includes grant writing. These courses include a university certificate for formal education. The downside, however, is that university programs fall short of helping students bridge the gap between learning the material and actually applying it—in other words, getting paid tp use your newly acquired knowledge in the field.
  • Online Courses: There’s a wide variety of online courses to help you learn how to become a grant writer. Online education is flexible for those who are looking to add grant writing as a new skill set on top of a full-time schedule (life, work, etc.) or level up their skills. Yes, even if you’re an in-house grant writer working with a nonprofit organization, professional training is applicable. You can check out a roundup of the best grant writing classes here.

Curious about how to break into grant writing without prior experience and with no added debt? The Global Grant Writers Collective is the only program of its kind to show you how to be a world-class grant writer while also building a flexible, fulfilling life you love.

Grant Writing vs. Non Profit Funding

We’ve covered all the basics, but there’s a bit more important context to understand as you launch your grant writing journey.

You know that grants provide funding to organizations to do good work in their communities, but how does this relate to the bigger concept of fundraising?

TL;DR — Grant Writing vs. Fundraising

Fundraising is how you raise money for your organization. Grant writing is one type of fundraising activity. Grant writing includes asking foundations or government entities for support while other fundraising activities usually target individual donors.

What is nonprofit fundraising?

Fundraising is generally defined as the process of soliciting financial support for a cause or project.

Central to the idea of fundraising is the collection of cash donations (although all kinds of assets can be donated). Donations can be collected immediately or over months or years, as is the case for long-term pledges of large donations to capital campaigns.

Fundraising is an essential way for most nonprofits to bring in revenue for their missions. Monies raised through general fundraising activities are often referred to as unrestricted funds and can be used for any expenses, such as staff salaries or rent. Donors can also require that their money be used in a specific (or restricted) way.

Who fundraises, and what do you need to do it?

Nonprofits are the most common group to fundraise. However, other groups like those adorable Girl Scouts selling their highly addictive cookies (our greatest weakness 😋) and people raising funds for mission trips are eligible for fundraising, too.

The only thing you technically need to fundraise is trust from your donors. But when you represent an organization, establishing trust means getting official with a 501(c)(3) designation and publishing an annual report.

Remember that fundraising isn’t so much about asking for money as it is about inviting others who have a passion for what you do to join you in your mission. Once you find them, you can do that work together—the beauty of fundraising!

How is grant writing different from fundraising?

As you can already tell, fundraising has a much broader definition than grant writing.

Fundraising can take many forms, and grant writing falls under that umbrella.

Fundraising usually refers to generating cash donations by:

  • Building relationships with individual donors
  • Holding fundraising events
  • Making public appeals for donations and marketing your organization to the community

When you submit a proposal for a grant, it’s a one-on-one targeted pitch to a funder. You understand their past giving history. You’ve vetted them for mission alignment, and your project meets their goals for impact. The relationship between you and the funder is more formalized (though there is room for personal relationships over time).

With fundraising through individual donors, not through a grant, your approach is less formal. You likely don’t need a lengthy proposal, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have a plan. To fundraise from individual donors, you may be soliciting funds from individuals whose circumstances and philanthropic interests are largely unknown to you. Your approach can usually be applied to a wider audience, whereas grant writing targets one organization with specific guidelines.

In either case, relationship-building and strategies like prospect research are very important for nonprofits.

Then what do grant writing and fundraising have in common? In both cases, you need to do research, pursue leads, prepare talking points, evaluate opportunities, and cultivate relationships. The essence of both practices is the same. What is different is the target and approach.

With all the context out of the way, let’s get to the meat and potatoes. How do you actually write a grant proposal? What are the key steps to follow?

Here it is: our signature 7-step process for writing a winning grant. We’ll summarize the key points to understand for each step, but please check out our longer grant writing process explainer for a deep dive into the nitty gritty.

  • Follow your North Star (the funding guidelines). A funder will provide guidelines for their grant that all applicants need to follow to be considered. Think of these as instructions. Guidelines can vary a lot from one grant to another, so it’s important to never take them for granted (see what we did there?). Download, print, read, and reread the guidelines.
  • Prepare your narrative skeleton. Every grant should tell a story, but sitting down to write a prizewinning story on a blank page is a lot easier said than done. Give yourself an easier start by outlining your proposal based on the funding guidelines themselves. These are the questions you’ll have to answer, so bake them into your story from the very start. Simple bullet points will do here—no need to lock down full sentences just yet.
  • Host a kick-off meeting. Gather everyone involved in the project to get on the same page. These are all the people who’ll provide you with the information you need for the grant as well as those who’ll be involved in running the project that it funds. Remember, everyone loves an organized meeting—send an agenda and your narrative skeleton in advance, then a summary of action items after, plus an invite to a progress check-in meeting.
  • Finalize your grant budget. Next, you need to know how much the project you’re proposing will cost to complete—this budget will impact all other parts of your application. For example, funders often ask for a “budget narrative” that explains how you determined your final numbers. Some grants are structured to provide a percentage of your total costs rather than a flat sum. Grab a copy of our free grant budget template when you’re ready!
  • Write your narrative fast and furiously. With your budget in hand, now’s the time to start putting pen to paper (or fingers to keys). Review your grant guidelines again, and start filling in your narrative skeleton with the details it needs to paint a compelling picture. We could go on and on with all the tips and hacks we’ve learned—check them out in Step 5 of our grant writing process guide.
  • Prep your key attachments. Funders usually want more than just your perfectly written document. They often ask for additional attachments like separate budget documents, a resolution, and letters of support. Some attachments, like resolutions, can take a long time to get finalized, which is why understanding your guidelines early is so important so that you can get the ball rolling quickly.
  • Review and submit your grant! Phew—you made it! But you’re not done yet. Reviewing and double-checking your proposal is a must, and it should be done by an independent reviewer who hasn’t been knee-deep in the process like you. Collect and discuss their feedback, make changes, review one last time, and then hit submit (ideally a day or two before the deadline). After the adrenaline wears off, take the afternoon off.

There’s no magic formula for writing a winning grant—your proposal should always be tailored to that unique grant and funder—but there are best practices and principles that give you a reliable roadmap to follow each time. Our 7-step grant writing process condenses a ton of them into one digestible process, but for an even closer look, join our free grant writing class!

Free Grant Writing Trainings

These how-to videos offer a smattering of webinar replays from our online grant writing training and feature topics such as working remotely, project management, fundraising, and how to utilize the Freedom of Information Act for federal funding.

Essential Grant Writing Tips for Newcomers

Once you’ve mastered the steps above, you’re probably wondering how to actually put rubber to the road and get started. Here are our top 5 recommendations:

  • Find a real project to work on! Try identifying a real grant opportunity and approaching a nonprofit in your community. Or if that idea terrifies you—we get it—you can start slower with sample projects and training courses.
  • Commit to excellence in project management. Grant writing is complicated, no way around it. Familiarize yourself with project management best practices and you can stay organized and energized.
  • Fake it until you make it. Imposter syndrome is very real, and even experienced grant writers deal with it. But don’t let it hold you back. When you invest in your grant writing skills and get real-world practice, you have something worth sharing. Build some momentum and see how far you can go!
  • Have a process mindset. When you pull the mask off the big hairy grant writing monster, you’ll find it’s really just a big stack of steps and processes—learnable steps and processes. Master these, and you’ll have a reliable framework for success.
  • Don’t be stubborn (said with love). Trying to go it alone when learning grant writing leads to more mistakes and wasted time and money. Grant writing is a craft, after all, and there’s a lot to be gained from connecting with fellow grant writers.

P.S. Want more grant writing videos like this one? There’s more where that came from.

Check out our YouTube channel and give us a follow!

If you’re new to grant writing (or even considering turning it into a side hustle), it’s important to understand the big picture. Why do grants matter?

Grants make up a considerable chunk of nonprofits’ operating revenue.

According to Nonprofit Impact Matters , the nonprofit sector generates roughly 31.8% of its revenue from government sources (including both grants and paid contracts) and 2.9% from foundations in the form of grants.

It’s generally recommended that grant funding should provide 10-20% of a nonprofit’s total annual budget.

Funding from foundations is growing.

Total giving from foundations reached $105.21 billion in 2022, a 2.5% increase from the year before, and it’s part of a continued upward trend. Put another way, foundations provided 21% of total giving to nonprofits , or $1 of every $5 given to charity.

This is one of only a few areas that saw growth when adjusted for inflation. Family foundations (founded by families as a way to better manage their philanthropic activities) and corporate foundations have led the charge.

Grants are an important part of a safe revenue mix.

Nonprofits need to have diversified revenue streams so that they can rely on other ways to generate money when one shrinks or dries up.

Grants are an essential part of this equation, especially as a turbulent economy causes individual donors to rein in their spending. Case in point—the 2023 Giving USA Report found that giving from individuals declined 6.4% in 2022 (or 13.4%, when adjusted for inflation), a finding that sent shockwaves through the nonprofit world.

But when a nonprofit has a sturdy fundraising program, grant writing process, and an active grant opportunity pipeline, it becomes much easier to weather the storms and keep on doing the good work their communities need.

This leads us to a logical conclusion (which you might have already caught onto)...

Grant writing is an incredibly valuable skill because:

  • It’s always in demand.
  • It helps nonprofits secure the diverse funding they need to thrive.
  • It drives on-the-ground good by funding projects and programs.

Competition for grants will only get tougher as giving from foundations grows and donor habits keep changing in the coming years.

The right unicorn of a grant writer can make a world of difference for nonprofit missions of all sizes and build the fulfilling career they want: a win-win!

Study up on grant writing best practices. Stretch your grant writing muscles by taking a free class or investing in more lessons, coaching, and community (like through the Global Grant Writers Collective ).

Whether you’re looking to win more funding for your nonprofit or break out into a new freelance field, anyone can succeed with grant writing with the right preparation and practice.

Want to learn more? We know you do. We recommend these additional resources:

  • Can I Make Money as a Grant Writer?
  • Three Possible Career Paths Through Grant Writing Training
  • Why Start a Side Hustle Grant Writing?
  • Grant Writing for Nonprofits: Our Top 10 Tips
  • Tips for Writing Your First Draft of a Grant Narrative
  • Top Mistakes Grant Applicants Make (And How to Avoid Them)
  • A Review of the Top 10 Grant Databases

Free Grant Writing Class

Learn the 7-steps to write a winning grant application and amplify the impact you have on your community.

About the author...

Alexis Swenson serves as Unicorn Coach and Content Director for Learn Grant Writing. The product of small-town northwestern Minnesota, she is a self-declared “old soul” and grounded free spirit. She has secured over $2.7 million in grant funding in her career. Alexis writes to help people learn, laugh, and not be so hard on themselves.

Want To Learn More?

We made this video to answer your questions about how to build a career in grant writing without the fear of where you will find clients or the fear of failure. We cover the top three mistakes that keep people from making the leap from a soul-sucking job to something more meaningful.

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How to Become a Grant Writer in 14 Steps

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What is a grant writer?

Role of a grant writer, what is the salary of a grant writer, what qualifications and skills are required to be a grant writer, how to become a grant writer in 14 steps, is the grant writer industry hard to break into, what are the day-to-day tasks of being a grant writer, the pros & cons of being a grant writer, where to find grant writing gigs, additional ways to find grant writing jobs.

Do you want to know how to become a grant writer? It’s a great career field to get into! This blog post will outline 14 steps to help you become a grant writing pro.

We’ll cover everything from understanding the grant writing process to building your professional network. So whether you’re just starting or looking for ways to improve your skills, this post is for you!

A grant writer is a professional who specializes in writing grant proposals. Grant writers typically work with nonprofit organizations, schools, and other entities that rely on funding from government agencies or private foundations to support their operations and programs. Grant writers typically have a research, writing, and project management background.

The primary role of a grant writer is to develop and write grant proposals. They work closely with organizations to understand their needs and goals and identify potential funding sources. Grant writers also research the grant-making organization and the specific funding opportunities. They also develop budgets and write project timelines.

In some cases, grant writers may also be responsible for managing the grant process once the proposal has been submitted. This can include communicating with the funder, collecting required documents, and ensuring that the organization meets all the grant requirements.

Grant writers typically work on a contract basis. A single organization or consultants may employ them for multiple organizations. Some grant writers also work for foundations or government agencies.

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as grant writers’ salaries can vary depending on their experience level, the type of organization they work for, and their job location.

However, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median annual salary for all writers and authors was $61,510 in 2021. This means that half of all writers and authors earned more than this amount, while the other half earned less.

Grant writers starting their careers can expect to earn less than those with more experience. According to Payscale.com, entry-level grant writers earn a median salary of $42,000 per year, while those with five to 9 years of experience earn a median salary of $53,000 per year. Experienced grant writers who have been in the field for 10 to 20 years earn a median salary of $59,000 per year , while those with 20 or more years of experience earn a median salary of $63,000 per year.

The type of organization a grant writer works for can also affect their salary. Grant writers who work for nonprofit organizations typically earn less than those who work for for-profit companies.

According to the BLS , the median annual salary for all technical writers was $78,060 in May 2021. However, according to ZipRecruiter , grant writers who work for nonprofit organizations earn a median salary of $57,586 in October 2022.

The location of a grant writer’s job can also affect their salary. Grant writers who live and work in large metropolitan areas typically earn more than those who live and work in small towns or rural areas. Grant writers who live and work in New York City earn a median salary of $60,319 in 2022, according to the ZipRecruiter .

Although there are no formal education requirements, most grant writers have at least a Bachelor’s degree. In addition, they should have excellent writing, research, and communication skills. Below are some suggestions about education and skills if you want to know how to become a grant writer.

Education requirements

As mentioned above, most have at least a bachelor’s degree. In addition, many grant writers have taken business writing, English, communications, or journalism courses.

Some grant writers have a Master’s degree in Business Administration (MBA), Public Administration, or a related field. These are all educational degrees that can help you be a more qualified grant writer, and potentially earn more, however, having an advanced degree is not required to be a successful grant writer.

Skills and qualifications

In addition to having excellent writing skills, grant writers need to be able to research and communicate effectively. They should also be able to work independently and meet deadlines.

Other essential skills and qualities for grant writers include:

  • Strong attention to detail
  • Organizational skills
  • The ability to multi-task
  • Time management skills
  • Research skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • The ability to work under pressure
  • The ability to take constructive criticism
  • The ability to work independently
  • The ability to meet deadlines

If you’re considering a career in grant writing, ensure you have the skills and qualifications required for the job. With the right skills and qualifications, you can become a successful grant writer and help organizations receive the needed funding.

These steps will help you to learn how to become a grant writer even if you have no existing experience .

1. Research the field of grant writing

It will help you to ensure it is a good fit for your skills, interests, and goals. Many books and online resources available can give you an overview of the grant writing process and what it entails.

2. Consider your education and experience

To become a grant writer, you’ll need at least a bachelor’s degree, although many employers prefer applicants with a master’s degree or higher. You should also have significant writing experience and experience in the field in that you’ll be writing grants.

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For example, if you want to write grants for a medical research organization, it would be helpful to have experience working in the medical field.

3. Develop your writing skills

As a grant writer, you’ll need to be able to write clearly and concisely. Be sure to brush up on your grammar and punctuation, and take some time to practice writing persuasively.

4. Learn about the grant-writing process

There’s more to writing a successful grant proposal than simply putting pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard). To be successful, you’ll need to understand the process of applying for grants, including how to find potential funding sources and what information needs to be included in your proposal.

5. Professional development courses

Consider completing a grant writing course or certification program. Although not required, this training can help you learn the skills needed to be a successful grant writer.

Many professional development courses can help you learn the skills you need to be a successful grant writer. These courses can be found online and offline and range in price from free to several hundred dollars.

6. Get some experience

While you may be able to get a job as a grant writer with no experience, it will likely be more challenging to land a good position without some previous experience. To gain some experience, consider volunteering to write grants for a local nonprofit organization or taking on a small project for a friend or family member.

7. Develop a strong writing portfolio

You will likely be asked to provide writing samples when applying for jobs. Having a well-rounded portfolio that showcases your grant writing skills is essential.

8. Network with individuals in your field

Attend conferences, workshops, and other events that focus on grant writing. This will help you meet others in the field and learn about new opportunities.

9. Start your own grant-writing business

This can be a great way to level up your career and work schedule. When starting, you may want to consider working with a grant writing partner or joining an existing firm.

10. Volunteer your grant writing services

This is a great way to get experience and build your portfolio. You can also use these opportunities to network and make contacts in the field.

11. Get involved with professional organizations.

These organizations offer many resources, including job boards, networking events, and continuing education opportunities.

12. Pursuing advanced education in grant writing or a related field

Consider pursuing advanced education in grant writing or a related field. This can help you further your career and stay current on trends in the field. There are many online and campus-based programs available.

13. Meet requirements

When you land a job, meet with your supervisor regularly to discuss your progress and get feedback.

This will help you fine-tune your skills and become the best grant writer you can be.

14. Stay up to date

The world of grant writing is constantly changing, so it’s essential to stay abreast of new developments. Consider joining a professional organization, such as the Grant Professionals Association, and attending conferences and workshops on grant writing. Reading grant-writing publications and blogs is an excellent way to stay informed.

The grant writing industry can be quite challenging to break into. There are a few key reasons for this.

First, the industry is quite competitive. Many individuals and organizations are vying for the same grant money. This can make it difficult to stand out from the crowd.

Second, the grant writing industry often requires a great deal of experience and knowledge. Many grant writers have years of experience in the field. They know what donors are looking for and how to write a winning proposal. This can make it difficult for newcomers to get in the door.

Third, the pay for grant writers can be pretty low. Many grant writers work on a freelance basis and are paid per project. This can make it challenging to make a good living as a grant writer.

Despite these challenges, it is possible to break into the grant writing industry. The key is to be persistent and to stand out from the competition. You can succeed in this rewarding field with a little hard work.

Assuming you are talking about a professional grant writer, the day-to-day tasks vary depending on the type of organization they work for and the stage of the grant process. Generally, a grant writer will:

1. Identify potential funding sources

2. Write proposals to foundations and other donors

3. Develop budgets

4. Write reports to donors

5. Manage the grant process from start to finish

6. Keep track of deadlines

7. Work with a team of colleagues, including program staff and senior leadership

The grant writer’s job is to package the organization and its programs in a way that appeals to potential funders. This involves understanding both the organization and the funding landscape. To be successful, grant writers must be excellent communicators, detail-oriented, and well-organized. They also need to understand fundraising basics and have a passion for their work.

Working as a grant writer can be an enriching career. You are helping others to obtain the funding they need to make their goals and dreams a reality. However, there are also some potential drawbacks to the job that you should be aware of before deciding to pursue it.

1. You can make a real difference in people’s lives.

2. It can be a very flexible job, allowing you to work from home or another location of your choice.

3. You can choose your hours and work as much or as little as you want.

4. There is a lot of potential for growth in the field.

5. Grant writing can be very lucrative, with some grant writers earning six-figure salaries.

1. The competition for grant writing jobs can be fierce.

2. It can be very stressful, as you often work under tight deadlines.

3. You need to have strong writing skills and be very detail-oriented.

4. It is essential to have a good understanding of the grant-making process.

5. You need to be knowledgeable about a wide range of topics.

There are many ways to become a grant writer. There are plenty of websites that post-grant writing jobs and many different ways to get the training needed to be a successful grant writer. Here are several websites where you can find grant writer jobs.

Indeed is a job search engine aggregating job postings from various sources, including company websites, job boards, and newspapers. To find grant writer jobs on Indeed, search for “grant writer” in the search bar. You can also search for grant writing jobs by location and filter the results by date posted, job type, and salary.

how to become a grant writer

2) Glassdoor

how to become a grant writer - Glassdoor

3) LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a social networking site for professionals. To find grant writing jobs on LinkedIn, search for “grant writer” in the search bar and select the “Jobs” tab. Alternatively, you can browse LinkedIn’s job postings by selecting the “Jobs” tab from the top menu.

how to become a grant writer - linkedin

Upwork is a website that connects freelancers with clients. You can search for grant writing jobs by keyword and filter the results by budget, skill level, and more.

how to become a grant writer - upwork

5) Freelancer

Freelancer is a website similar to Upwork, where freelancers can connect with clients. You can search for grant writing jobs by keyword and filter the results by budget, skill level, and more.

how to become a grant writer - freelancer

Guru is another website that connects freelancers with clients. You can search for grant writing jobs by keyword and filter the results by budget, skill level, and more.

how to become a grant writer - guru

Pro Tip: There are also many online job boards that list grant writing jobs and other types of positions in the nonprofit sector. Some of the most popular include Idealist, Philanthropy News Digest, Grant Writers Directory or GrantStation, and GrantSpace. Check these sites regularly, and don’t forget to set up alerts to notify you as new jobs are posted.

7) Craigslist

Craigslist is a website that allows users to post classified ads for free. To find grant writing jobs on Craigslist, select your city or region from the list of Craigslist locations and search for “grant writer” in the jobs section.

how to become a grant writer - craigslist

In addition to the methods mentioned above, there are many other ways you can find grant writing jobs. Here are a few to consider:

1. Networking

One of the best ways to find grant writing jobs is through networking. Get connected with people in your field and let them know you’re interested in grant writing. Attend conferences, join professional organizations, and participate in online forums related to your work. You never know who might be able to point you in the right direction.

2. Personal Contacts

If you know someone who works for a nonprofit organization, don’t be afraid to ask if they’re aware of any open grant writing positions. Many times, these types of jobs are not publicly advertised but are instead filled through personal contacts.

3. Professional placement firms

Some firms specialize in placing individuals in nonprofit jobs, including grant writing positions. While you will likely have to pay a fee to use their services, it may be worth it if you’re having difficulty finding a job on your own.

4. Grantmakers

It can’t hurt to go to the source and contact grantmakers directly to inquire about open positions. Many of them have staff dedicated to working with grant writers and may be able to point you in the right direction.

5. Online Resources

Many online resources can help you find grant writing jobs. For example, the Foundation Center’s website offers a searchable database of grantmakers and a directory of grant-writing consultants.

6. State Job Banks

If you’re looking for a government job, don’t forget to check your state’s job bank. Many states have positions available for grant writers, especially at the local level.

7. Classified Ads

Although it’s not as common as it once was, you can still find grant writing jobs advertised in the classified section of your local newspaper or online.

8. Job Fairs

Job fairs are a great way to meet employers and learn about available positions, including grant writing jobs. Check with your local Chamber of Commerce or professional organization to see if any job fairs are scheduled in your area.

9. Direct Mail

Another old-fashioned but still effective method for finding grant writing jobs is to send a direct mail inquiry to nonprofits in your area. They will often be happy to let you know if there are any open positions.

10. Volunteer

One way to get your foot in the door is to volunteer with a nonprofit organization that relies heavily on grant funding. Not only will you be able to learn about the grant writing process, but you may also be in an excellent position to apply for a paid position when one becomes available.

11. Internships

Many nonprofits offer internships to give students and others hands-on experience in the grant writing process. These can be great opportunities to learn about the field and make meaningful connections.

12. Temp agencies

If you’re having difficulty finding a full-time grant writing job, you may want to consider working with a temp agency. This can allow you to try out different positions and see if grant writing is the right fit.

13. College career centers

If you’re a college student or recent graduate, your school’s career center can be an excellent resource for finding grant writing jobs. They may have listings for positions and information about upcoming job fairs.

14. Professional organizations

If you’re a member of a professional organization, such as the American Grant Writers Association or the National Council of Nonprofits, you may be able to find grant writing jobs listed on their websites. These organizations offer job postings, networking opportunities, and professional development resources.

15. Social media

Social media can be a great way to connect with potential employers and learn about available grant-writing jobs. LinkedIn is a handy tool for this purpose. You can also search Twitter using relevant hashtags, such as #grantwritingjobs.

Finding grant writing jobs can be challenging, but finding positions that are a good fit for your skills and experience is possible. Using the tips and resources above, you can increase your chances of landing a job in this competitive field and help organizations get the funding they need.

Are you interested in becoming a grant writer? What are your thoughts on the 14 steps on how to become a grant writer we outlined? Let us know in the comments below.

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The Grant Writer Occupation

One of the most crucial jobs for a Non-Profit agency is that of the Grant Writer. The function of a Grant Writer is to gather documentation and fulfill the necessary requirements of various funding bodies to formally seek funding on behalf of their agency. For many non-profits grants from various foundations and other funding organizations are their life’s blood and primary funding mechanism. While individual donors at times can make substantial contributions to a non-profits working capital, it is the work of the Grant Writer that provides the largest most consistent blocks of funding for the non-profit. Different foundations and other funding organizations may have vastly different requirements to formally apply for a grant. A Grant Writer must be an excellent researcher who not only finds the funding organization who’s grants match with their non-profit, but also must be an astute writer who knows how to properly appeal to the funding organizations board.

The key skills of a Grant Writer are:

  • Excellent written communication skills
  • Top-shelf research skills
  • Ability to understand the needs of both the agency in need of funding and the organization that is offering the grant money
  • Great organizational skills
  • Being able to understand and execute complex instructions
  • Outstanding computer skills

Education to Join the Workforce

There are many routes to becoming a Grant Writer. The most important talent of any Grant Writer is excellent writing skills. The majority of Grant Writers have a Bachelor’s degree is English, Journalism, Communications or Marketing. Grant writing is one career where a more advanced degree may not be required, but will certainly be seen as preferable to candidates who only hold a Bachelor’s degree.

Grant Writer as a Service to Society

The Grant Writer provides a critical component for non-profits who provide all manner of Service to Society. While the role of a Grant Writer is an absolutely essential component for the smooth functioning of almost all non-profit agencies even though its impact to the outside observer is subtle and hidden. The Grant Writer is somewhat unique among Human Services workers in that they can plug into virtually any non-profit agency or industry that pursues grant money, bringing their skills to almost any scenario and making a huge impact. Due to this, the Grant Writer is able to choose a non-profit whose function is a personal cause that they believe in. A Grant Writer is also able to go from one non-profit to another and radically change the kind of agency they work in. A Grant Writer can also work in a freelance capacity writing grants for a number of agencies within a relatively short period of time.

Impact on Society

The Grant Writer’s impact on society is subtle, but is actually hugely impactful. By helping a vast assortment of non-profits maintain a stable source of working capital, the Grant Writer provides an essential role to a great diversity of Human Services agencies. As non-profits have a hugely beneficial impact on society in many different ways, the Grant Writer can be seen as a critical role for the functioning of non-profits and all the irreplaceable work they do. Grant Writers are also hired by for profit agencies that are eligible for grant money so the scope of the impact of Grant Writers is actually extremely large.

Salary Potential for Grant Writers

The earning potential for a grant writer will vary significantly from state to state and also is dependent on educational background. According to the BLS, the median pay for a technical writer (a field that includes Grant Writers among others) is $86,760

You will want to determine what educational route you wish to embark on in order to become a Grant Writer. The world view and abilities of Marketing students are very different from that of English majors. You may also wish to consider degrees in education and Journalism. All of these paths to becoming a Grant Writer are valid, but you will need to discover for yourself which particular path feels right for you.

2022 US Bureau of Labor Statistics salary and employment figures for Grant Writer reflect national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Data accessed May 2023.

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Boot Camp Session Dates:

The following dates are available for this boot camp. Once you register, our enrollment team will contact you to confirm your session dates.

Professional Grant Writing

This course is designed to provide you with the skills to become a professional grant writer while also preparing you for the grant professional certified (gpc) exam..

Professional-Grant-Writing

Requirements

Prerequisites.

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Ready to develop the skills and strategies you need to become an integral part of one of the world's fastest-growing professional certification sectors—grant writing? In the Professional Grant Writing course, you will further the ideals and goals of your career track by learning about the required competencies that can lead to an internationally recognized certification by one of the leading grant professional associations. Did you know that there's more to writing grants than finding funding and writing grant proposals? Grant professionals must also learn how to delve into supporting organizational development for grant applicants, coach them in communicating with potential funders, assist with internal and external collaborations with a successful mix of partners, and magically spin-out program design language.

In this course, you will become proficient in the proposal and case statement formats used by foundations and government grantmaking agencies. Throughout the course, you will learn about the certification process for grant professionals and write different elements of a complete grant application, culminating in a case statement for your capstone assignment with expert instructor feedback on each element. From grant funding trends to matching your course project to the right funding sources, you will be confident in differentiating yourself from a grant writer to a grant professional!

You will also be prepared for the Grant Professional Certified (GPC) exam offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI), which has minimum requirements of education and grant experience based on the level of education obtained. This course has been accepted in GPCI's (Grant Professionals Certification Institute) Accepted Education Program.

What you will learn

  • How a certification enhances professionalism and opportunities for grant writers
  • The skills needed to be a professional grant writer
  • Ways current trends can impact the distribution of funds in the private and public sectors
  • How to match grant funders and fundable programs
  • Organizational missions, cultures, and norms, and how they impact grant readiness
  • Best practices to create a logic model showing interrelationships among elements of project design
  • An evaluation plan using community resources and cultural competencies
  • Prepare a grant budget with appropriate costs, cash, in-kind or leveraged matches
  • Describe the grant writer's role in post-award grant management and transition

How you will benefit

  • Communicate effectively with grant funders for relationship cultivation
  • Submit a grant proposal
  • Write a persuasive case statement
  • Use a professional code of ethics to guide decisions and conduct
  • Why Get a Grant Writing Certification
  • Being Confident in Your Grant Writing Skills
  • Grant Funding Trends
  • Grant Funding Resources and Best Matches for Programs and Projects
  • Establishing Initial and Ongoing Relationships with Funders
  • Relationship Between Organizational Development and Grant Seeking Readiness
  • Proposal Writing Preparation
  • Proposal Writing Research, Implementation Strategies, Writing Characteristics, and Incorporating Graphics
  • Writing the Boilerplate for the Grant Applicant Organization
  • Diving Deep Into Organizational Development Strategies and Funding Needs
  • Midterm Exam and Writing Prompt Response
  • Stakeholders, Partnerships, and Key Personnel Collaborations and Communications
  • Effective Program and Project Design and Development Strategies
  • Community Resources, Evaluation Designs, and Cultural Competencies
  • Proposal Budgets
  • Grant Proposal Submission Processes and Follow-up for Unfunded Submissions
  • Funded Grant Requests
  • Writing an Effective Case Statement for Fundraising Purposes
  • Capstone Assignment: Case Statement
  • Deciding to Move Forward with Certification
  • Employability Ethics
  • Bonus Lesson: Interview Pregame

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements:

  • This course can be taken on either a PC, Mac, or Chromebook.

Software Requirements:

  • PC: Windows 10 or later.
  • Mac: macOS 10.10 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox is preferred. Microsoft Edge and Safari are also compatible.
  • Microsoft Excel (not included)
  • Microsoft Word Online
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.
  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Instructional Material Requirements:

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment. The following textbooks will be shipped to you approximately 7-10 business days after enrollment:

  • Prepare for the GPC Exam: Earn Your Grant Professional Certified Credential

Please note: You will receive a digital book if the physical book is on backorder.

Prerequisites:

This course is intended for anyone interested in developing their grant writing skills. You will need an internet connection, be familiar with using the internet, have emailing capabilities, and have experience using a word-processing computer program (Microsoft Word is recommended) and a spreadsheet program (such as Microsoft Excel) for the budgeting portion.

Certification Requirements:

It is also aligned with the Grant Professional Certified (GPC) exam offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI), which has minimum requirements of education and grant experience based on the level of education obtained. Completion of this course is applicable for 10 GPCI Education points towards acquiring or in maintaining the GPC certification. For information on GPC Exam Eligibility

You've got questions. We're here to help.

Our highly knowledgeable Enrollment Specialists will answer any questions you might have about the course and payment options.

Dr. Beverly A. Browning

Dr. Beverly A. Browning is a grant writing consultant and visionary who uses thought leadership to work with nonprofit organizations struggling with the woes of revenue stream imbalances. She has been researching grant funding, grantmaking trends, and board-related barriers to nonprofit capacity building for over 40 years. Together she and her team have helped her clients win over $750 million in grant awards. Dr. Browning is the founder and director of the Grant Writing Training Foundation and Bev Browning, LLC. She is the author of 44 grant writing publications, including six editions of Grant Writing for Dummies and the 6th edition of Nonprofit Kit for Dummies (to be published in 2021). Dr. Browning holds graduate and post-graduate degrees in organizational development, public administration, and business administration. She is also a Certified Strategic Planning Facilitator (CSPF), has a McNellis Compression Planning Institute Facilitation Training distinction, and is an Approved Trainer for the Grant Professionals Association (GPA), the Certified Fund Raising Executive International (CFRE, and the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI).

Does this course prepare for a certification?

Yes, you will be prepared for the Grant Professional Certified (GPC) exam offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI), which has minimum education and grant experience requirements based on the level of education obtained. Completion of this course is applicable for 10 GPCI Education points towards acquiring or in maintaining the GPC certification. For information on GPC Exam Eligibility

When can I start this course?

This course is open enrollment, so you can register and start the course whenever you are ready. Access to your course can take 24-48 business hours.

How long does it take to complete this course?

After you register, you will receive 6 months to complete the course. The time allotted for completion has been calculated based on the number of course hours.

What if I don't have enough time to complete the course within the time frame provided?

The time allotted for course completion has been calculated based on the number of course hours. However, if you are unable to complete the course, contact the student advising team to see what options you may have available to work out a suitable completion date. Please note that an extension fee may be charged.

What kind of support will I receive?

Our courses are designed to accommodate various learning preferences. Depending on the course structure, you may get different forms of support. Self-paced courses are designed to be user-friendly and independent, minimizing the need for external support. In courses with instructors, our direct platform support feature includes opportunities for questions, discussions, and remediation, with email and phone support available for select courses. Our student advising team is available to guide you on program requirements and administrative requests, but they do not provide assistance with course content. Our goal is to provide you with the necessary support for success, whether it's through self-paced exploration, direct communication, or guidance from our advising team.

What happens when I complete the course?

Upon successfully passing the final exam, you will be awarded a certificate of completion from the school or organization that you registered through.

Am I guaranteed a job?

ed2go courses will help you gain the skills you need to obtain an entry-level position in most cases. However, you should always research the job market in your area before enrolling.

Can I get financial assistance?

ed2go courses are non-credit, so they do not qualify for federal aid, FAFSA, and Pell Grant. In some states, vocational rehab or workforce development boards may provide funding to take our courses. Additionally, you may qualify for financial assistance if you meet certain requirements. Learn more about financial assistance.

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What does a grant writer do?

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What is a Grant Writer?

A grant writer helps nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, and other entities secure funding by researching and writing grant proposals. Grant writers are skilled at communicating the mission and goals of an organization in a compelling way to potential funders. They are responsible for understanding the specific requirements of each grant opportunity, identifying the needs of the organization, and creating a detailed and persuasive proposal that meets the funder's criteria.

The grant writer may work independently or as part of a team, collaborating with program managers, financial officers, and other stakeholders to ensure that the proposal accurately reflects the organization's goals and objectives.

What does a Grant Writer do?

A grant writer working to secure funding.

Grant writers play a crucial role in the nonprofit sector, helping organizations secure the resources they need to carry out their missions. Grant writers must have excellent research, writing, and communication skills, as well as a deep understanding of the funding landscape and the needs of the organizations they serve. They must be able to manage multiple projects and deadlines, work collaboratively with others, and adapt quickly to changing circumstances. Successful grant writers are passionate about their work and are committed to making a positive impact in their communities.

Duties and Responsibilities Some of the key duties and responsibilities of a grant writer include:

  • Researching potential funding sources: Grant writers must conduct research to identify potential funding sources that match the organization's needs and goals. They may use databases or online resources to find grant opportunities.
  • Writing grant proposals: Grant writers must write compelling and persuasive grant proposals that clearly articulate the organization's mission, goals, and needs. They must be able to explain how the proposed project will benefit the community and how the organization will use the grant funds.
  • Coordinating with staff and stakeholders: Grant writers must work closely with the organization's staff and stakeholders to ensure that the proposal accurately reflects the organization's goals and objectives.
  • Meeting deadlines: Grant writers must adhere to strict deadlines for submitting grant proposals. They must manage their time effectively to ensure that they have enough time to conduct research, write the proposal, and make any necessary revisions.
  • Maintaining records: Grant writers must keep accurate records of all grant proposals, including deadlines, submission dates, and funding results.
  • Staying up-to-date on regulations: Grant writers must stay current on federal, state, and local regulations that govern grant funding. They must ensure that their proposals meet all the requirements and guidelines set by funding agencies.
  • Evaluating outcomes: Grant writers may be responsible for evaluating the success of the grant-funded projects and reporting on the outcomes to the funding agency. They must track the progress of the project and collect data to measure its impact on the community.

Types of Grant Writers There are different types of grant writers, each with their own specialization and expertise. Here are some common types of grant writers:

  • Freelance Grant Writers: These are self-employed grant writers who work on a project-by-project basis. They may work with multiple clients at the same time, and may specialize in a specific field or type of grant.
  • In-house Grant Writers: These grant writers work for an organization or company as a full-time or part-time employee. They are responsible for identifying grant opportunities and writing proposals that align with the organization's goals and objectives.
  • Contract Grant Writers: Contract grant writers are hired by organizations or companies to work on a specific grant proposal or project. They may work on a short-term or long-term basis, depending on the needs of the organization.
  • Proposal Development Consultants: These grant writers specialize in developing grant proposals for non-profit organizations, government agencies, and foundations. They provide guidance and support to organizations throughout the entire grant application process.
  • Research Grant Writers: These grant writers specialize in securing funding for research projects in fields such as science, medicine, and technology. They are often required to have a deep understanding of the specific field in which they are writing grant proposals.
  • Government Grant Writers: These grant writers specialize in securing funding from federal, state, and local government agencies. They are familiar with the regulations and guidelines that must be followed when applying for government grants.

What is the workplace of a Grant Writer like?

Grant writers can work in a variety of settings, including non-profit organizations, government agencies, research institutions, and consulting firms. Depending on their specific role, they may work from a traditional office setting, or they may work remotely.

Grant writers typically spend a significant amount of time conducting research, reviewing grant guidelines, and drafting proposals. They work closely with program managers, project directors, and other staff members to develop grant proposals that align with the organization's goals and objectives. They must be able to effectively communicate complex ideas and data to a range of audiences, including funders and stakeholders.

Grant writers may work on multiple projects simultaneously, and must be able to manage their time effectively to meet strict deadlines. They may also be responsible for tracking and reporting on grant expenditures, and ensuring compliance with grant requirements.

In some cases, grant writers may be required to travel to attend meetings or conferences related to their grant proposals. They may also participate in fundraising and development activities to support the organization's overall mission and goals.

Frequently Asked Questions

Writing and journalism related careers and degrees.

Writing Careers

  • Academic Writer
  • Content Writer
  • Fiction Writer
  • Food Critic
  • Ghostwriter
  • Grant Writer
  • Music Critic
  • Nonfiction Writer
  • Screenwriter
  • Speechwriter
  • Sports Writer
  • Technical Writer
  • Television Writer
  • Travel Writer

Journalism Careers

  • Correspondent
  • News Anchor
  • News Reporter
  • Photojournalist

Corresponding Degrees

  • Broadcast Journalism
  • Children's Literature
  • Creative Writing
  • Screenwriting
  • Songwriting
  • Technical Writing

Continue reading

education requirements to be a grant writer

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Home › Career › What Does a Grant Writer Do?

What Does a Grant Writer Do?

grant writing certification

Become a Certified Grant Writer

TABLE OF CONTENTS

A grant writer secures a crucial element of any nonprofit organization: funding. Grant writers get just one application with grant proposals, so it’s essential to ensure that grant writers know what to say and how to say it.

In this article, you’ll see what a full-time grant writing professional does on a typical day and get answers to common grant writing questions.

If you’re interested in learning through video, watch below.

CMMS Software

A grant writer acts as a documentation specialist and salesperson of a nonprofit organization, public institution, or entity looking for funding.

Grant writers need to put their arguments in a written proposal.

They are also responsible for researching grants, federal or private. They gather the necessary documentation, prove why their fundraising venture requires assistance, and fulfill other requirements set by funding agencies.

Grant writers need to be familiar with their organization’s mission to explain it to funders and supply the lifeblood of every organization: critical funds for operations. A grant writer must keep finding grant-makers and ensure consistent funding for the nonprofit.

The requirements for each organization are different for each grant writing project and job. If you’re interested in learning more about the grant writing process, check out our Grant Writing Certification course. That will teach you the fundamentals of grant writing and how to access ideal grant writing opportunities for your skill and education.

For example, some who rely heavily on grant proposals might be looking for exceptional writing skills, years of experience, and familiarity with the grant writing process. Other grant writing opportunities might be more lenient.

Essential skills that every nonprofit (and small business) looks for in a grant writer include:

  • Persuasive writing skills
  • Excellent research skills for funding opportunities
  • A strategic approach towards writing proposals
  • Ability to understand an organization’s mission properly
  • An understanding of how funding agencies work (as well as utilizing that to secure funding)
  • Organizational skills
  • Proven track record of fulfilling complex requirements and crafting tailored grant applications
  • Being well-versed with Office applications

While a Bachelor’s degree or higher is not an absolute prerequisite for a grant writing job, especially as a freelancer, it is highly recommended. Some organizations may require you to have a degree on top of the above skills.

Grant Proposals Writer Qualifications

Here are the qualifications for a typical grant writer:

  • Bachelor’s degree in a writing-intensive field (English Linguistics, Journalism, Marketing, or Communication)
  • Master’s Degree in Social Sciences, Creative Writing, or Nonprofit Management
  • Advanced certification or vocational diploma in grant writing
  • Experience in corporate or technical writing

Online certifications are a great way to learn bankable skills such as grant writing. However, they are best when paired with a Bachelor’s Degree.

Grant Writer Roles and Responsibilities

A significant part of a grant writer’s day includes writing and crafting the perfect proposal .   When working for a grant writing service, the writer speaks with clients to better understand the organization’s mission. They make notes to help them find funding opportunities for their specific needs. Meetings like this usually take about 25% of the writer’s time.

Then comes research. In some cases, clients need grant money but don’t know about any funders or their policies. It becomes the writer’s responsibility to find them private or federal grants.

With a quick search, writers check clients’ eligibility for different funding programs and make more notes to present to clients later.

Writers search on social media, too, trying out different keywords and sifting through RFPs (Requests for Proposals) to check eligibility.

Research usually takes up about 50% of the writers’ time, on average. Research also includes hunting for statistics.

With all the relevant data, writers will start writing grants and formatting. The proposal writing process usually takes about 10%-15% of the writer’s time. Depending on the complexity, it might take a bit longer.

Lastly, grant writers will need to create custom illustrations, charts, and projections (with the client’s help) to make the proposal more relevant. The design takes up around 10% of the writer’s time.

These proposals aren’t just targeted towards private funders but may also be public foundations. Federal grants are much more attractive but are highly competitive as well. From healthcare to charity, animal care, research, and more, nonprofits and some businesses depend on grant writers and grant writing services.

Do Grant Writers Focus on Quick Deliverables?

On average, it takes about three weeks to a month to complete a well-structured and researched grant application. If writers are freelancers or working part-time, the process becomes more complex and takes longer.

However, some grant writing services and freelancers offer quick deliverables.

A grant proposal that’s written haphazardly rarely results in a successful grant. Delivering a 40-page grant proposal within a few days will mean that the writer didn’t go into as many details as they should have. Of course, sometimes circumstances dictate that you need quick deliverables without compromising quality.

The only way to get a high-quality grant proposal in about a week or two is to hire a professional grant writer with at least 5-8 years of experience.

It’s also better to find a writer who has worked on grants specific to your industry and niche.

The research time decreases significantly with experience in a specific industry since these writers know what to target.

A Typical Time Table for A Grant Writer

Let’s look at what a writer with a track record of winning private and federal government grants does during their workday.

They start their workday by spending the first few hours grant writing and editing their work. When writers already have research done, they have to put their thoughts down persuasively.

If writers need more research or illustrations, they create graphs or projections. Then, grant writers connect with clients via LinkedIn, Zoom meetings, or email. Other duties appear as needed.

How Much Do Grant Writers Get Paid?

According to Glassdoor, the average salary for grant writers is $49,661 yearly, while the complete salary range is between 35 and 70k.

Nonprofits, educational institutions, and various community health centers are the biggest employers for grant writers in the US. Organizations such as American Red Cross and Salvation Army are better-known names for grant writing expertise. Additionally, according to PayScale, expert grant writers can earn up to $20k in profit-sharing and $11k in commissions.

The grant writer salary considers:

  • Written linguistic skills
  • Overall customer service output
  • Qualifications
  • Occupational history

Depending on where they’re employed, grant writers may get promotions that come with significant pay raises.

How Do Grant Writers Interact With Clients?

As mentioned above, before starting work on a project, grant writers spend a considerable amount of time discussing requirements, fundraising opportunities, the organization’s mission, and other relevant subjects.

The goal is to know as much as possible about their intentions with the grant and ask for all material that could help their grant application be more appealing.

For research grants, this discussion also includes asking about the research process, the incentive behind it, goals, progress, and coordinators.

Suppose there are any prototype pictures or alpha/beta results. In that case, they strengthen their chances of winning the grant money. The resumes of all the people involved in the research process are also collected.

It usually takes about a day or two to collect everything necessary. After that, the writer is on their own. They create an outline before starting work to have something to guide them. From this point onwards, the research process begins. If writers need anything else, they let the client know of their intention to discuss the project via email or direct message.

It is important to remember that clients pay a sum to the writers. They, therefore, expect to remain in the loop on how far along their project is.

The grant writing process is relatively slow, and clients know that well enough. Despite that, writers should make a point of welcoming any communication attempts from clients.

Bottom Line for Grant Writers

Differences in actual responsibilities come from the host company from role to role. Some employers may have them working on multiple different kinds of grant applications. In contrast, others may require a single type of document.

Grant writing is a complex blend of technical and creative writing. It, therefore, has to be perfected over time if the writer is to succeed in the long term. It has mental stress factors, so grant writers must take leave when necessary.

For those just starting, we recommend you email a nonprofit organization or grant writing service for an internship instead of winging it from the start.

You will learn a lot about what a grant writer does, the research process, how to handle clients, and more. Once you are confident about your abilities, feel free to apply for a job within the professional sphere and make the most out of your years of experience and exceptional grant writing skills.

Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to the most common questions about what a grant writer does. You’ll see more in our grant writing course that teaches you how to use grant funding application principles to write grants and win business.

What does it take to be a grant writer?

To become a great grant writer, you need to have excellent communication skills and work well with people from various backgrounds. The grant process typically starts by reading through what grant is requested (i.e., research funding, community development), who’s asking it (the organization or individual), and why they need funding.

Is writing grants hard?

Grant writing is hard if you’re not familiar with grant processes. But if you know what to expect and do your research, grant writing can be a gratifying profession.

Can anyone write grants?

If you want to become a great grant writer, it’s helpful to have a certification or Bachelor of Arts degree in English or Communications with several years of experience in a related profession. These professions include researchers, journalists, or project managers within social services agencies on behalf of governments or private organizations.

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Grant Writer Education Requirements

There are several educational requirements to become a grant writer. Grant writers usually study business, english, or psychology. 64% of grant writers hold a bachelor's degree, and 23% hold an master's degree. We analyzed 6,760 real grant writer resumes to see exactly what grant writer education sections show.

The most common colleges for grant writers are the University of Phoenix and the University of Phoenix.

There are also many online grant writer courses to help get the education required to be a grant writer.

There are certain grant writer certifications that you should consider. These grant writer certifications include Certified Program Evaluator (CPE) and Certified Professional - Human Resource (IPMA-CP).

What education do you need to become a grant writer?

What degree do you need to be a grant writer.

The most common degree for grant writers is bachelor's degree, with 64% of grant writers earning that degree. The second and third most common degree levels are master's degree degree at 23% and master's degree degree at 6%.

  • Bachelor's , 64%
  • Master's , 23%
  • Associate , 6%
  • Doctorate , 4%
  • Other Degrees , 3%

What should I major in to become a grant writer?

You should major in business to become a grant writer. 17% of grant writers major in business. Other common majors for a grant writer include english and psychology.

  • Business , 17%
  • English , 13%
  • Psychology , 9%
  • Political Science , 7%
  • Other Majors , 54%

Most common colleges for grant writers

Grant writers often get their degrees at University of Phoenix, New York University, and Florida State University. Here are the most common colleges for grant writers in the US based on their resumes.

Best majors for grant writers

Best colleges for grant writers.

The best colleges for grant writers are Northwestern University, Stanford University, and University of Southern California.

A grant writer with advanced education typically earns a higher salary and has access to better jobs. That's why Zippia looked into the best colleges for grant writers. We based this list on several metrics: admissions rate, retention rate, mean earnings of graduates, the ratio of working vs. non-working students ten years after admission, the average cost of attendance, and median debt for graduates who become grant writers.

Northwestern University

1. Northwestern University

Evanston, IL • Private

In-State Tuition

Stanford University

2. Stanford University

Stanford, CA • Private

Pennsylvania State University

3. Pennsylvania State University

University Park, PA • Private

University of Houston

4. University of Houston

Houston, TX • Private

University of Southern California

5. University of Southern California

Los Angeles, CA • Private

Syracuse University

6. Syracuse University

Syracuse, NY • Private

San Diego State University

7. San Diego State University

San Diego, CA • Private

Marquette University

8. Marquette University

Milwaukee, WI • Private

Duquesne University

9. Duquesne University

Pittsburgh, PA • Private

Boston University

10. Boston University

Boston, MA • Private

20 best online courses for grant writers

1. Cybersecurity: Developing a Program for Your Business

Cybersecurity is an essential business skill for the evolving workplace. For-profit companies, government agencies, and not-for-profit organizations all need technologically proficient, business-savvy information technology security professionals. In this Specialization, you will learn about a variety of processes for protecting business assets through policy, education and training, and technology best practices. You’ll develop an awareness of the risks and cyber threats or attacks associated...

2. Grant Writing: Keys to a Successful Proposal

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6. Proposal Writing & Management (+APMP Foundation Exam Prep)

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A complete beginners guide to writing and applying for grant funding...

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Top 10 most affordable universities for grant writers

The most affordable schools for grant writers are Baruch College of the City University of New York, university of florida, and usf sarasota-manatee.

If the best universities for grant writers are out of your price range, check out these affordable schools. After factoring in in-state tuition and fees, the average cost of attendance, admissions rate, average net price, and mean earnings after six years, we found that these are the most affordable schools for grant writers.

Baruch College of the City University of New York

1. Baruch College of the City University of New York

New York, NY • Private

Cost of Attendance

University of Florida

2. University of Florida

Gainesville, FL • Private

3. USF Sarasota-Manatee

Sarasota, FL • Private

SUNY Farmingdale

4. SUNY Farmingdale

Farmingdale, NY • Private

California State University - Dominguez Hills

5. California State University - Dominguez Hills

Carson, CA • Private

Brigham Young University

6. Brigham Young University

Provo, UT • Private

Florida State University

7. Florida State University

Tallahassee, FL • Private

Brooklyn College of the City University of New York

8. Brooklyn College of the City University of New York

Brooklyn, NY • Private

City College of New York of the City University of New York, The

9. City College of New York of the City University of New York, The

California State University - Bakersfield

10. California State University - Bakersfield

Bakersfield, CA • Private

Top 10 hardest universities to get into for grant writers

The hardest universities for grant writers to get into are Northwestern University, Stanford University, and University of Southern California.

Some great schools for grant writers are hard to get into, but they also set your career up for greater success. The list below shows the most challenging universities to get into for grant writers based on an institution's admissions rates, average SAT scores accepted, median ACT scores accepted, and mean earnings of students six years after admission.

Admissions Rate

SAT Average

3. University of Southern California

4. boston university.

Washington University in St Louis

5. Washington University in St Louis

Saint Louis, MO • Private

Northeastern University

6. Northeastern University

George Washington University, The

7. George Washington University, The

Washington, DC • Private

New York University

8. New York University

Villanova University

9. Villanova University

Villanova, PA • Private

Southern Methodist University

10. Southern Methodist University

Dallas, TX • Private

Top 10 easy-to-apply-to universities for grant writers

The easiest schools for grant writers to get into are Holy Names University, notre dame de namur university, and oklahoma wesleyan university.

Some schools are much easier to get into. If you want to start your career as a grant writer without much hassle, check out the list of schools where you will be accepted in no time. We compiled admissions rates, average SAT scores, average ACT scores, and average salary of students six years after graduation to uncover which were the easiest schools to get into for grant writers.

Holy Names University

1. Holy Names University

Oakland, CA • Private

Notre Dame de Namur University

2. Notre Dame de Namur University

Belmont, CA • Private

Oklahoma Wesleyan University

3. Oklahoma Wesleyan University

Bartlesville, OK • Private

Saint Joseph's College of Maine

4. Saint Joseph's College of Maine

Standish, ME • Private

Mount Saint Mary's University

5. Mount Saint Mary's University

Barry University

6. Barry University

Miami, FL • Private

Notre Dame College

7. Notre Dame College

Cleveland, OH • Private

Kean University

8. Kean University

Union, NJ • Private

Cardinal Stritch University

9. Cardinal Stritch University

10. rochester university.

Rochester Hills, MI • Private

Average grant writer salary by education level

According to our data, grant writers with a Bachelor's degree earn the highest average salary, at $55,373 annually. Grant writers with a Master's degree earn an average annual salary of $55,043.

Grant Writer Education FAQs

What is the best college for grant writers, search for grant writer jobs.

Updated March 14, 2024

Editorial Staff

The Zippia Research Team has spent countless hours reviewing resumes, job postings, and government data to determine what goes into getting a job in each phase of life. Professional writers and data scientists comprise the Zippia Research Team.

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Top 10 Grant Writer Certifications

Photo of Brenna Goyette

Updated July 7, 2023 17 min read

Certifications for grant writers are important for two main reasons: credibility and knowledge. First, certifications can provide a grant writer with increased credibility in the job market. Having a certification demonstrates a level of expertise and professionalism that can be attractive to potential employers.

Second, certifications may also provide grant writers with specialized knowledge and skills that they might not have obtained through their academic or professional experience. Certifications often come with educational programs, workshops, and seminars that can help grant writers stay up to date on the latest trends in grant writing. This specialized knowledge can help them write more effective grants that have a better chance of being approved by funding sources.

This article reviews some of the top certifications for Grant Writers and explains how they can contribute to a grant writer's career, helping them become more successful and competitive in their field.

What are Grant Writer Certifications?

Grant writer certification is a professional credential that is designed to recognize the expertise and knowledge of grant writers. It is awarded by a variety of organizations, including the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI). This certification is intended to demonstrate a commitment to the profession and provide potential employers with assurance that an individual has met certain standards for proficiency in grant writing.

Certification can be especially beneficial for those seeking employment in the field of grant writing. A certified grant writer may be more attractive to employers because they have demonstrated their ability to write successful grants and stay up-to-date on the latest changes in the industry. Having this certification can also help individuals earn higher salaries, as it shows employers that they are knowledgeable about the field and have put in effort to increase their skillset. Additionally, many organizations require certified grant writers, so having this certification can increase your chances of being hired.

Overall, obtaining a grant writer certification can be extremely beneficial for those who wish to pursue a career in this field or advance their current role. It serves as an official recognition of your knowledge and experience within the industry, which can help you stand out from other applicants and improve your chances of getting hired or promoted.

Pro Tip: Before you decide to pursue grant writer certification, make sure to research the various certifications available and their associated costs. Different certifications offer different levels of recognition and come with a variety of requirements, so it's important to find one that best suits your needs.

Related : What does a Grant Writer do?

Here’s our list of the best certifications available to Grant Writers today.

1. Certified Grant Professional (GPC)

Certified Grant Professional (GPC) is a professional certification program offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI). It is designed to recognize professionals who have demonstrated knowledge, skills, and abilities in grant writing and grant management. The GPC credential is the only internationally-recognized grant certification program for grant professionals.

To earn the GPC credential, applicants must meet certain eligibility requirements, including having a minimum of three years of grant experience and completing at least 40 hours of continuing education in grantsmanship. Applicants must also pass an online examination administered by the GPCI. The exam consists of 150 multiple-choice questions that cover topics such as research methods, proposal writing, and project management.

The process of becoming a Certified Grant Professional typically takes between six months and one year. During this time, applicants are expected to complete their continuing education requirements and prepare for the examination.

The cost to become a Certified Grant Professional varies depending on the applicant’s level of experience and whether they are members of any professional organizations such as the Grant Professionals Association or National Grants Management Association. Generally speaking, it can cost anywhere from $500 to $1,000 to become certified.

2. Certified Proposal Writer (CPW)

Certified Proposal Writer (CPW) is a professional certification program designed to help professionals develop the skills and knowledge required to write effective proposals. The CPW program is offered by the Association of Proposal Management Professionals (APMP).

The CPW certification requires applicants to pass an exam that covers topics such as proposal development, writing, management, and evaluation. The exam consists of multiple-choice questions and takes approximately two hours to complete. To be eligible for the CPW certification, applicants must have at least three years of experience in proposal writing or related fields.

To get certified as a Certified Proposal Writer, applicants must first register with APMP and pay the associated fee. After registering, applicants will receive study materials and access to practice exams which can help them prepare for the actual exam. Once they are ready to take the exam, applicants can schedule their appointment with an APMP-approved testing center.

The cost for taking the CPW exam varies depending on where you take it, but typically ranges from $200-$400 USD.

3. Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE)

The Certified Fundraising Executive (CFRE) is a professional credential that recognizes individuals who have demonstrated excellence in the fundraising profession. It is the only globally-recognized certification for fundraising professionals and is granted by CFRE International, an independent non-profit organization.

To be eligible to receive the CFRE credential, applicants must meet certain criteria, including having a minimum of five years of full-time paid professional experience in fundraising and completing at least 100 hours of continuing education in fundraising or related topics within the past five years.

The process to obtain the CFRE credential involves submitting an application to CFRE International and passing a written examination. The exam consists of 175 multiple-choice questions covering six core knowledge areas: ethics and accountability; relationship building; resource development; stewardship and donor relations; volunteerism; and management. The exam takes approximately four hours to complete.

The cost for taking the exam is $395 for members of CFRE International or $495 for non-members. There are also additional fees for re-testing if necessary, as well as annual renewal fees after obtaining the credential.

4. National Grants Management Association (NGMA) Certification

The National Grants Management Association (NGMA) Certification is a professional certification program that provides training and recognition to individuals in the grants management field. The NGMA Certification is designed to recognize the knowledge, skills, and abilities of those who work in grants management. It is an independent certification program, not affiliated with any particular organization or government agency.

The NGMA Certification consists of two levels: Certified Grants Manager (CGM) and Certified Senior Grants Manager (CSGM). To earn either level of certification, applicants must demonstrate their knowledge of grants management by passing a comprehensive examination. The CGM exam covers topics such as grant policies and procedures, financial management, compliance monitoring, and reporting requirements. The CSGM exam covers more advanced topics such as strategic planning for grant programs and performance measurement.

It typically takes about six months to prepare for the NGMA Certification exams. Applicants should plan on studying for at least two hours per day during this time period. There are several study materials available from the NGMA website that can help applicants prepare for the exams.

The cost of the NGMA Certification exams varies depending on which level you are applying for. The CGM exam costs $395 while the CSGM exam costs $495. In addition, there is an annual renewal fee of $50 for both levels of certification.

Overall, obtaining the NGMA Certification can be a great way to demonstrate your expertise in grants management and advance your career in this field.

5. Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI) Certification

The Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI) is a non-profit organization that provides certification to grant professionals who demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to be successful in the field. This certification is recognized by the National Council of Nonprofits and is an internationally recognized standard for grant professionals.

To become certified through GPCI, applicants must meet certain requirements, including having at least three years of professional experience in grant writing or related fields and completing a minimum of 40 hours of continuing education within the past five years. Applicants must also pass an exam that covers topics such as proposal writing, budget development, research methods, and evaluation techniques.

The GPCI certification process typically takes between three to six months to complete. To begin the process, applicants must submit an application form along with supporting documents such as proof of experience and continuing education credits. After submitting their application materials, applicants will receive an email notification with instructions on how to access their online exam. The exam consists of 100 multiple-choice questions that must be completed within two hours. Once applicants have passed the exam they will receive their GPCI certification card via mail.

The cost for GPCI certification varies depending on whether you are a member or non-member of the Grant Professionals Association (GPA). For GPA members, the cost is $295; for non-members it is $395. Additionally, there is a one-time fee of $50 for new applications and $25 for renewals every five years.

6. American Grant Writers' Association (AGWA) Certification

The American Grant Writers’ Association (AGWA) Certification is a professional certification program for grant writers. It is designed to recognize and promote the highest standards of grant writing excellence and professionalism. The certification requires applicants to demonstrate their knowledge, skills, and experience in grant writing by passing an exam.

To become certified, applicants must have at least three years of professional grant writing experience or equivalent education and training. They must also submit a portfolio that demonstrates their understanding of the fundamentals of grant writing, including research techniques, proposal development, and evaluation strategies.

The AGWA Certification Exam is offered twice a year in April and October. The exam consists of 100 multiple-choice questions that cover all aspects of grant writing. It takes approximately four hours to complete the exam.

Applicants must pay an application fee of $200 when they apply for the AGWA Certification Exam. Once they pass the exam, they will receive their certificate within six weeks after the exam date. There is an annual renewal fee of $50 to maintain active certification status with AGWA.

7. National Council of Nonprofits (NCN) Certified Grant Writer

The National Council of Nonprofits (NCN) Certified Grant Writer is a professional credential that recognizes the knowledge and experience of grant writers. It is designed to provide nonprofit organizations with assurance that the grant writer they hire has the necessary skills and expertise to write successful grants.

The certification process involves completing an online application, passing an exam, and submitting a portfolio of grant writing samples. The exam consists of multiple-choice questions covering topics such as grant writing fundamentals, proposal development, research methods, evaluation techniques, and reporting requirements.

It typically takes 3-6 months to complete the certification process. The cost of the certification varies depending on the type of membership you have with NCN. For example, individual members pay $295 for the certification while organizational members pay $395.

In addition to providing assurance that your grant writer has the necessary skills and expertise, having a certified grant writer can help boost your organization’s credibility when applying for grants. It also shows potential funders that you are committed to investing in quality grant writing services.

8. Foundation Center's Grantsmanship Training Program

The Foundation Center's Grantsmanship Training Program is an intensive, five-day course designed to help nonprofit organizations develop the skills and knowledge needed to successfully pursue and secure funding from foundations, corporations, and government sources. The program provides practical instruction on the entire grants process from researching potential funders, writing effective proposals, developing budgets, and building relationships with funders.

The training program is offered in various locations throughout the United States as well as online. It typically takes place over five consecutive days and includes a combination of lectures, interactive exercises, group discussions, case studies, and individual coaching. Participants will receive a certificate of completion upon successful completion of the program.

To get the training program you can register online or by mail. The cost for the five-day training program varies depending on location but typically ranges from $1,500 - $2,000 per person.

9. Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Certificate in Fundraising Management

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Certificate in Fundraising Management is a professional certification program designed to provide fundraising professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in their field. The program consists of four courses that cover topics such as donor relations, grant writing, event planning, and financial management. Each course is offered online and can be completed in approximately 8-10 weeks.

In order to receive the AFP Certificate in Fundraising Management, individuals must successfully complete all four courses. Upon completion of the four courses, individuals will receive a certificate from AFP acknowledging their successful completion of the program.

The cost for the AFP Certificate in Fundraising Management is $1,200 USD. This fee covers all four courses and the certificate itself.

10. International Grant Professionals Network (IGPN) Certification

The International Grant Professionals Network (IGPN) is a professional association dedicated to providing certification, education and networking opportunities for grant professionals. The IGPN Certification is the only international credentialing program that recognizes the knowledge and skills of grant professionals. It is designed to recognize those who have achieved a high level of expertise in the field of grant writing, management, and evaluation.

The IGPN Certification Program consists of two parts: an online exam and an in-person assessment. The online exam covers topics such as grant writing, management, evaluation, and research methods. The in-person assessment includes an individualized review of the candidate’s grant writing portfolio by a panel of experienced grant professionals.

To obtain the IGPN Certification, candidates must pass both the online exam and the in-person assessment with a score of at least 80%. Candidates must also submit proof of their professional experience in grant writing or related fields.

The entire process typically takes about six months to complete from start to finish. Candidates should expect to spend several hours studying for the online exam and preparing their portfolio for submission prior to taking the in-person assessment.

The cost for obtaining IGPN Certification varies based on membership status with IGPNNetwork.org. Non-members are charged a one-time fee of $350 USD; members are charged $250 USD; and students are charged $200 USD.

Do You Really Need a Grant Writer Certificate?

The short answer is no. You do not need a grant writer certificate to become a successful grant writer. However, having credentials can give you an edge in the competitive world of grant writing. It can demonstrate to potential employers and clients that you have taken the time to learn the craft of grant writing and have invested in your professional development.

A grant writer certificate is generally offered by universities or other organizations as part of a continuing education program. These programs are typically designed for those who are already working within the field of grant writing, but may also be beneficial for newcomers to the industry. In addition to providing formal education and training on various topics related to grant writing, such courses may provide access to resources like sample proposals and tips on how to write effective grants.

Ultimately, if you want to become a successful grant writer, it is important to understand both the technical and creative aspects of this profession. You should be able to research potential funding sources, create compelling proposals, and develop relationships with funders. Having a certification or degree in grant writing can certainly give you an advantage over others who lack these credentials; however, it ultimately comes down to your experience and skill set when competing for jobs or contracts.

Related : Grant Writer Resume Examples

FAQs About Grant Writer Certifications

1. What is a grant writer certification?

Answer: A grant writer certification is an educational program or credential that provides training to individuals in the field of grant writing and demonstrates expertise in the area. It can help individuals obtain jobs in a variety of organizations, from nonprofit organizations to government agencies.

2. What are the benefits of having a grant writer certification?

Answer: Having a grant writer certification demonstrates that you have the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in securing grants for your organization or client. It also gives you access to resources and networks that may not be available without the certification. Additionally, it can provide career advancement opportunities as well as increased job security.

3. How do I become certified as a grant writer?

Answer: Certification programs vary depending on the institution offering them, but typically require completion of coursework related to grant writing, such as research methods, proposal writing, budgeting and evaluation techniques. Some programs may also require applicants to have experience in grant writing or related fields before being accepted into the program.

4. How long does it take to get certified as a grant writer?

Answer: The length of time needed to complete a certification program varies depending on the institution offering it and how much time an individual has available for studying and completing coursework requirements. Generally speaking, most programs take between six months and one year to complete.

5. Is there an exam required for becoming certified as a grant writer?

Answer: Yes, most institutions offering certification programs will require applicants to pass an exam prior to receiving their certificate of completion or credentialing status. Exams typically cover topics such as research methods, proposal writing, budgeting and evaluation techniques related to effective grant writing practices.

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Brenna Goyette

Brenna is a certified professional resume writer, career expert, and the content manager of the ResumeCat team. She has a background in corporate recruiting and human resources and has been writing resumes for over 10 years. Brenna has experience in recruiting for tech, finance, and marketing roles and has a passion for helping people find their dream jobs. She creates expert resources to help job seekers write the best resumes and cover letters, land the job, and succeed in the workplace.

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Professional Grant Writing

This course is designed to provide you with the skills to become a professional grant writer while also preparing you for the grant professional certified (gpc) exam..

Professional-Grant-Writing

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Ready to develop the skills and strategies you need to become an integral part of one of the world's fastest-growing professional certification sectors—grant writing? In the Professional Grant Writing course, you will further the ideals and goals of your career track by learning about the required competencies that can lead to an internationally recognized certification by one of the leading grant professional associations. Did you know that there's more to writing grants than finding funding and writing grant proposals? Grant professionals must also learn how to delve into supporting organizational development for grant applicants, coach them in communicating with potential funders, assist with internal and external collaborations with a successful mix of partners, and magically spin-out program design language.

In this course, you will become proficient in the proposal and case statement formats used by foundations and government grantmaking agencies. Throughout the course, you will learn about the certification process for grant professionals and write different elements of a complete grant application, culminating in a case statement for your capstone assignment with expert instructor feedback on each element. From grant funding trends to matching your course project to the right funding sources, you will be confident in differentiating yourself from a grant writer to a grant professional!

You will also be prepared for the Grant Professional Certified (GPC) exam offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI), which has minimum requirements of education and grant experience based on the level of education obtained. This course has been accepted in GPCI's (Grant Professionals Certification Institute) Accepted Education Program.

What you will learn

  • How a certification enhances professionalism and opportunities for grant writers
  • The skills needed to be a professional grant writer
  • Ways current trends can impact the distribution of funds in the private and public sectors
  • How to match grant funders and fundable programs
  • Organizational missions, cultures, and norms, and how they impact grant readiness
  • Best practices to create a logic model showing interrelationships among elements of project design
  • An evaluation plan using community resources and cultural competencies
  • Prepare a grant budget with appropriate costs, cash, in-kind or leveraged matches
  • Describe the grant writer's role in post-award grant management and transition

How you will benefit

  • Communicate effectively with grant funders for relationship cultivation
  • Submit a grant proposal
  • Write a persuasive case statement
  • Use a professional code of ethics to guide decisions and conduct
  • Why Get a Grant Writing Certification
  • Being Confident in Your Grant Writing Skills
  • Grant Funding Trends
  • Grant Funding Resources and Best Matches for Programs and Projects
  • Establishing Initial and Ongoing Relationships with Funders
  • Relationship Between Organizational Development and Grant Seeking Readiness
  • Proposal Writing Preparation
  • Proposal Writing Research, Implementation Strategies, Writing Characteristics, and Incorporating Graphics
  • Writing the Boilerplate for the Grant Applicant Organization
  • Diving Deep Into Organizational Development Strategies and Funding Needs
  • Midterm Exam and Writing Prompt Response
  • Stakeholders, Partnerships, and Key Personnel Collaborations and Communications
  • Effective Program and Project Design and Development Strategies
  • Community Resources, Evaluation Designs, and Cultural Competencies
  • Proposal Budgets
  • Grant Proposal Submission Processes and Follow-up for Unfunded Submissions
  • Funded Grant Requests
  • Writing an Effective Case Statement for Fundraising Purposes
  • Capstone Assignment: Case Statement
  • Deciding to Move Forward with Certification
  • Employability Ethics
  • Bonus Lesson: Interview Pregame

Requirements:

Hardware Requirements:

  • This course can be taken on either a PC, Mac, or Chromebook.

Software Requirements:

  • PC: Windows 10 or later.
  • Mac: macOS 10.10 or later.
  • Browser: The latest version of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox is preferred. Microsoft Edge and Safari are also compatible.
  • Microsoft Excel (not included)
  • Microsoft Word Online
  • Adobe Acrobat Reader
  • Software must be installed and fully operational before the course begins.
  • Email capabilities and access to a personal email account.

Instructional Material Requirements:

The instructional materials required for this course are included in enrollment. The following textbooks will be shipped to you approximately 7-10 business days after enrollment:

  • Prepare for the GPC Exam: Earn Your Grant Professional Certified Credential

Please note: You will receive a digital book if the physical book is on backorder.

Prerequisites:

This course is intended for anyone interested in developing their grant writing skills. You will need an internet connection, be familiar with using the internet, have emailing capabilities, and have experience using a word-processing computer program (Microsoft Word is recommended) and a spreadsheet program (such as Microsoft Excel) for the budgeting portion.

Certification Requirements:

It is also aligned with the Grant Professional Certified (GPC) exam offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI), which has minimum requirements of education and grant experience based on the level of education obtained. Completion of this course is applicable for 10 GPCI Education points towards acquiring or in maintaining the GPC certification. For information on GPC Exam Eligibility

You've got questions. We're here to help.

Our highly knowledgeable Enrollment Specialists will answer any questions you might have about the course and payment options.

Dr. Beverly A. Browning

Dr. Beverly A. Browning is a grant writing consultant and visionary who uses thought leadership to work with nonprofit organizations struggling with the woes of revenue stream imbalances. She has been researching grant funding, grantmaking trends, and board-related barriers to nonprofit capacity building for over 40 years. Together she and her team have helped her clients win over $750 million in grant awards. Dr. Browning is the founder and director of the Grant Writing Training Foundation and Bev Browning, LLC. She is the author of 44 grant writing publications, including six editions of Grant Writing for Dummies and the 6th edition of Nonprofit Kit for Dummies (to be published in 2021). Dr. Browning holds graduate and post-graduate degrees in organizational development, public administration, and business administration. She is also a Certified Strategic Planning Facilitator (CSPF), has a McNellis Compression Planning Institute Facilitation Training distinction, and is an Approved Trainer for the Grant Professionals Association (GPA), the Certified Fund Raising Executive International (CFRE, and the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI).

Does this course prepare for a certification?

Yes, you will be prepared for the Grant Professional Certified (GPC) exam offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI), which has minimum education and grant experience requirements based on the level of education obtained. Completion of this course is applicable for 10 GPCI Education points towards acquiring or in maintaining the GPC certification. For information on GPC Exam Eligibility

When can I start this course?

This course is open enrollment, so you can register and start the course whenever you are ready. Access to your course can take 24-48 business hours.

How long does it take to complete this course?

After you register, you will receive 6 months to complete the course. The time allotted for completion has been calculated based on the number of course hours.

What if I don't have enough time to complete the course within the time frame provided?

The time allotted for course completion has been calculated based on the number of course hours. However, if you are unable to complete the course, contact the student advising team to see what options you may have available to work out a suitable completion date. Please note that an extension fee may be charged.

What kind of support will I receive?

Our courses are designed to accommodate various learning preferences. Depending on the course structure, you may get different forms of support. Self-paced courses are designed to be user-friendly and independent, minimizing the need for external support. In courses with instructors, our direct platform support feature includes opportunities for questions, discussions, and remediation, with email and phone support available for select courses. Our student advising team is available to guide you on program requirements and administrative requests, but they do not provide assistance with course content. Our goal is to provide you with the necessary support for success, whether it's through self-paced exploration, direct communication, or guidance from our advising team.

What happens when I complete the course?

Upon successfully passing the final exam, you will be awarded a certificate of completion from the school or organization that you registered through.

Am I guaranteed a job?

ed2go courses will help you gain the skills you need to obtain an entry-level position in most cases. However, you should always research the job market in your area before enrolling.

Can I get financial assistance?

ed2go courses are non-credit, so they do not qualify for federal aid, FAFSA, and Pell Grant. In some states, vocational rehab or workforce development boards may provide funding to take our courses. Additionally, you may qualify for financial assistance if you meet certain requirements. Learn more about financial assistance.

How can I get more information about this course?

If you have questions that are not answered on our website, representatives are available via LIVE chat. You can also call us at 1-877-221-5151 during regular business hours to have your questions promptly answered. If you are visiting us during non-business hours, please send us a question using the "Contact Us."

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IMAGES

  1. 6 Stages of Grant Writing

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  2. 6 Tips for Writing a Successful Grant

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  3. 12 Grant Writing Jobs You Can Do As a Beginner (& That Pay Well)

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  4. How to Become a Grant Writer without Experience

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  5. Best Grant Writing Tips and Strategies 2023

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  6. How to Become a Grant Writer?

    education requirements to be a grant writer

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  1. 2024 DC Oral History Collaborative and Extensions Grant Workshop

  2. Grantwriting Mastery

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COMMENTS

  1. How To Become a Grant Writer

    These are the basic steps you may take to become a grant writer: Earn an undergraduate degree. Learn how to write grant proposals. Gain experience. Update your resume.

  2. How to Become a Grant Writer

    First, you'll need to obtain an undergraduate degree in a writing field or educational studies, programs that teaches you the basics of composition, revision, style, and tone. These skills will help you craft authoritative grant proposals in a professional setting.

  3. Guide to Becoming a Grant Writer: Expert Advice From Seasoned

    Step 1: Understanding the Grant Writing Profession The first step in becoming a grant writer involves gaining a deep understanding of the grant writing profession. So what does a grant writer do? In general, grant writers are responsible for crafting winning grant proposals for nonprofit organizations. ‍

  4. How to Become a Grant Writer: Education, Skills, Salary

    July 30, 2022 Career Advice How to Become a Grant Writer: Education, Skills, Salary UOTP Marketing Not everyone finds the idea of writing for a living exciting and compelling. However, those who do, try to find a career where writing is one of the main requirements for the job.

  5. Grant Writing 101: What is it & how do you get started?

    🌟 What is grant writing? Grant writing is the process of crafting a written proposal to receive grant funding from a grant making institution in order to fund a program or project. Grant writing involves laying out your case for why the grant will do the most good for you (or your project or organization).

  6. How to become a grant writer

    To be eligible, candidates must have a minimum of three years of professional experience in grant writing or management, pass an exam, and complete ongoing professional development.

  7. How to Become a Grant Writer without Experience

    Grant Writer Requirements. If you want to be a successful grant-writer, whether you're self-employed or work under an agency, you need to have a few education requirements as a requisite. We highly suggest you develop and polish the skills to stand out as a grant writer to recruiters. 1. Written Communication

  8. Step-by-Step Guide to Becoming a Grant Writer

    With their expertise, you can increase your chances of securing the financial resources that your nonprofit organization most needs. How do I become a grant writer with no experience? If you have no experience as a grant writer, the best way to get started is to start doing research.

  9. How to Become a Grant Writer in 14 Steps

    Takeaway This post may contain affiliate links. See our affiliate disclosure for more. Do you want to know how to become a grant writer? It's a great career field to get into! This blog post will outline 14 steps to help you become a grant writing pro.

  10. The Ultimate Guide to Becoming a Certified Grant Writer

    Become educated in areas such as what funders are looking for, how to develop a proposal, and the types of materials you need to submit. Additionally, you may want to consider earning a grant writing certificate or attending seminars related to grant writing.

  11. How to Become a Grant Writer: Expert Tips & Advice For 2024

    Everything about grant writing is constantly evolving, from databases and opportunities to requirements and skillsets. So, you need to always stay up-to-date with the latest trends. For example, attending educational webinars can provide the perfect chance to hone your skills and rub elbows with funders, consultants, and members of different ...

  12. Learn About Being a Grant Writer

    Grant writer requirements Grant writers generally obtain a higher-level education and several years of relevant experience before establishing a career in the field. Education The vast majority of grant writers hold a bachelor's degree. Post-secondary programs that focus on effective communication, persuasion and research methods can prove ...

  13. Grant Writer Job Description, Salary, and Education Info

    The majority of Grant Writers have a Bachelor's degree is English, Journalism, Communications or Marketing. Grant writing is one career where a more advanced degree may not be required, but will certainly be seen as preferable to candidates who only hold a Bachelor's degree. Grant Writer as a Service to Society

  14. Online Professional Grant Writing from City College of New York

    This course is designed to provide you with the skills to become a professional grant writer while also preparing you for the Grant Professional Certified (GPC) exam. $2,295.00 (USD) Buy in monthly payments with Affirm on orders over $50. Learn more. ENROLL NOW phone Call Us: 855.520.6806. schedule.

  15. How To Become a Grant Writer With No Experience in 6 Steps

    If you currently have no experience, you can become a grant writer by taking writing classes, pursuing certification and building a portfolio. Grant writers often have skills like effective written communication, attention to detail, proofreading and research. Explore Grant Writer jobs on Indeed View more jobs What is grant writing?

  16. Paths to Becoming a Grant Writer

    2. Consult on Proposals as a Subject-Matter Expert. Another common path to becoming a grant writer is through subject-matter expertise. The vast majority of grants are for projects rather than for core funding (the latter is funding to cover basic operating expenses).

  17. What does a grant writer do?

    Grant writers must have excellent research, writing, and communication skills, as well as a deep understanding of the funding landscape and the needs of the organizations they serve. They must be able to manage multiple projects and deadlines, work collaboratively with others, and adapt quickly to changing circumstances.

  18. Grant Writer Job Description [Updated for 2024]

    Grant Writer Education and Training Requirements. A Grant Writer should at least have a bachelor's degree, preferably in areas such as communications, journalism, creative writing, marketing, etc. Some organizations look for a master's degree, especially if the position involves writing proposals for large donors and international ...

  19. What Does a Grant Writer Do?

    Written linguistic skills. Overall customer service output. Qualifications. Occupational history. A grant writer secures a crucial element of any nonprofit organization: funding. Grant writers get just one application with grant proposals, so it's essential to ensure that grant writers know what to say and how to say it.

  20. Best Colleges and Degrees For Grant Writers

    The best colleges for grant writers are University of Phoenix, New York University, and Florida State University. A grant writer with advanced education typically earns a higher salary and has access to better jobs. That's why Zippia looked into the best colleges for grant writers.

  21. How To Get a Grant Writing Certification in 4 Steps

    1. Choose a certification The first step is choosing a certificate that aligns with your career goals. For example, you might want to write grants in education, health care, animal welfare or community development.

  22. Top 10 Grant Writer Certifications

    During this time, applicants are expected to complete their continuing education requirements and prepare for the examination. ... Answer: A grant writer certification is an educational program or credential that provides training to individuals in the field of grant writing and demonstrates expertise in the area. It can help individuals obtain ...

  23. Grant Writer for Educational Franchise Startup

    Hey Sade S., I have carefully read through the project requirements for the Grant Writer position for the educational franchise startup in Atlanta, Georgia. To successfully secure the necessary business capital, I plan to conduct thorough research on government, non-profit, and foundation grants suitable for the educational service sector.

  24. Online Professional Grant Writing from Kennesaw State University

    Learn all the skills you need to become a professional grant writer, with grant funding, proposal writing, and budgeting. Includes GPC exam prep. ... exam offered by the Grant Professionals Certification Institute (GPCI), which has minimum requirements of education and grant experience based on the level of education obtained. This course has ...