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APA 7th Edition Guide

  • Citing Sources in PowerPoint Presentations
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Citing Sources in PowerPoint Slides

  • PowerPoint - In-text Citations
  • PowerPoint - References List

Note:  APA does not have specific rules about the format of PowerPoint slides.  Rasmussen University does have recommended guidelines outlined below and in the attached PPT presentation.

PowerPoint slides  may   need citations, depending on what type of information is included on the slide.

If the text on a slide is a quote (someone else's words, verbatim) or someone else's ideas in the presenter's own words, then a citation is needed.

If the text placed on a slide is simply a word or phrase that represents a topic that the presenter will be discussing in greater detail, then a citation is not needed.

The table below includes two PowerPoint slides (left side). The column on the right tells whether or not the information would need to be cited and why.

how to properly cite in a powerpoint presentation

Speaker Notes:  Some assignments require text in the Speaker Notes area of the PowerPoint slide. If information from a source is quoted, summarized, or paraphrased in that area, an in-text citation and reference will likely be required. Ask your instructor for clarification.

  • Presentations & APA Citation Style at Rasmussen University Great resource to share with students if they are having struggles with APA in PPTs.

PowerPoint Slides - References

There are two ways to include the Reference list in your presentation:

  • Coordinating reference lists are typically handed out during or after the presentation either in print if presenting in person, or electronically if presenting online. This is the preferred method of including a Reference list of the sources cited in your slide deck.
  • Include a Reference list in the last slide of the presentation. This is an acceptable method if there are not many resources to include. Avoid adding so many resources to the list that the type is not legible to those attending the presentation

Creating the Reference List Slide

  • If you use outside sources in your presentation (noted in your in-text citations), you must cite those sources on a References page/slide.
  • Your Reference page can be created in NoodleTools, exported to Microsoft Word, and distributed or submitted with your slides to those who attend your presentation. Ask your instructor if they would like a Reference slide as the last slide of your presentation. Note that you may need more than one slide depending on how many references are needed.

See the slide deck below for more information.

  • << Previous: Missing Reference Information
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  • Last Updated: May 31, 2024 11:23 AM
  • URL: https://guides.rasmussen.edu/apa

Home / Guides / Citation Guides / How to Cite Sources / How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA, MLA or Chicago

How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA, MLA or Chicago

Let’s be honest: Sometimes the best information for a paper comes straight from a professor’s PowerPoint presentation. But did you know that source needs to be cited?

Whether you’re making use of your instructor’s lecture materials or pulling information from a Powerpoint found online, you need to make sure to cite your sources if you use information from it in a project or paper.

Here’s a run -t hrough of everything this page includes:  

  • Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in MLA format
  • Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA format
  • Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in Chicago Style

By now, you’re probably familiar with how to cite websites, books or journal articles, but not as knowledgeable about how to cite a Powerpoint presentation. In actuality, citing PowerPoint presentations aren’t all that different from citing written materials, so don’t let yourself be phased! It’s not too hard and compiling an MLA works cited or APA reference page doesn’t take too long—each one should take just a few minutes to create.

To help you with the process, we’ve put together a handy guide demonstrating how to cite a PowerPoint presentation in three commonly used citation styles: MLA, APA and Chicago.

Let’s start by looking for basic information you’ll need for the citation.

Information you may need to cite a PowerPoint Presentation:

  • Author or authors of the presentation
  • Presentation title
  • Date of publication/presentation
  • Place of publication/where the presentation was given
  • URL (if used to locate the presentation)

Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in MLA format:

MLA format citation structure:

Author Last Name, First Name. Presentation Title. Month Year, URL. PowerPoint Presentation.

Example citation :

Park, Lisa. Effective Working Teams . Jan. 2011, https://www.company.meetings/teams. PowerPoint Presentation.

In-text citation structure:

(Last Name)

Example in-text citation:

Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA format:  

APA reference structure:

Author or Presenter Last Name, Middle Initial. First Initial. (Date of publication). Title of presentation [PowerPoint presentation]. Conference Name, Location. URL

Example reference:

Park, L. (2011, March 24-28). Effective working teams [PowerPoint presentation]. Regional Dairy Workers National Conference, New York, NY, United States. https://www.company.meetings/teams

Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in Chicago Style:

Chicago citation structure:

Author Last Name, First Name. “Presentation Title.” Lecture, Location of Lecture, Month Day, Year.

Example citation:

Park, Lisa. “Effective Working Teams.” Lecture, The Plaza Hotel, New York, NY, January 11, 2011.

Troubleshooting

Solution #1: how to cite a powerpoint that has multiple authors..

For a presentation with multiple authors, list the authors alphabetically by last name for the full reference citation. The citation will list each author by Last Name, First Initial.

If the PowerPoint has just two authors, separate them with a comma and an ampersand (&). If the PowerPoint has more than two authors, list the authors separated by commas.

Reference examples:

Felner, D., & Nguy, A. (2021 April 10-12). The history of Claymation [Slideshow]. Animation Now, Los Angeles, CA, United States.

Felner, D., Nguy, A., Becham, G. (2021 April 10-12). The history of Claymation [Slideshow]. Animation Now, Los Angeles, CA, United States.

For an in-text citation for two authors, give both surnames separated by an ampersand (&) followed by a comma and the year of publication or presentation.

For an in-text citation for three or more authors, list the first author’s surname followed by “et al.” followed by a comma and the year of publication or presentation.

In-text citation examples:

(Felner & Nguy, 2021)

(Felner et al., 2021)

For a PowerPoint with two presenters or authors, include both names in the full works-cited citation. The names need to be written as follows: First presenter’s Last Name, First Name, and then the second presenter’s First Name and Last Name.

For an in-text citation, simply list the surnames of both presenters.

In-text citation example:

(Nguy and Felner)

Work-cited entry example:

Nguy, Anna and Dominic Felner. The History of Claymation. Apr. 2021. PowerPoint Presentation.

For a PowerPoint with three or more presenters, only list one presenter’s name followed by a comma and “et al.”

For an in-text citation for three or more authors or presenters , list the surname given in the full works-cited citation followed by “et al.”

(Nguy et al.)

Nguy, Anna et al. The History of Claymation. Apr. 2021. PowerPoint Presentation.

Solution #2 How to cite a slideshow that wasn’t made with PowerPoint

If making a full works-cited citation for a slideshow that was made with another program other than PowerPoint, include the medium in brackets instead of PowerPoint.

If the presentation is not in PowerPoint, and you can’t determine what software was used, include the word “slideshow” in brackets in place of PowerPoint.

Nguy, A. (2021 April 10-12). The history of Claymation [Prezi presentation]. Animation Now, Los Angeles, CA, United States.

Nguy, A. (2021 April 10-12). The history of Claymation [Slideshow]. Animation Now, Los Angeles, CA, United States.

The in-text citation will be formatted like any other APA in-text citation (author last name, year).

(Nguy, 2021)

At the end of your full works-cited citation, include the program the slideshow was made with, formatted as:  ______ Presentation.

If you are uncertain of the program used, end your citation with “slideshow” followed by a period. Nguy, Anna. The history of Claymation. Apr. 2021. Prezi Presentation. Nguy, Anna. The history of Claymation . Apr. 2021. Slideshow.

The in-text citation will be formatted like any other MLA in-text citation (author last name).

Hello all paper writers! Take a moment to try our spell checker , or refresh your knowledge on English basics with our EasyBib grammar guides ! Discover a determiner definition , learn what is an adverb , review an interjection list , and more.   

Updated April 26, 2021.

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To cite PowerPoint presentation slides, include the author name, year/date of presentation, the title, the source description, the website and/or university name, and the URL where the source can be found.

If the PowerPoint presentation is not accessible to the reader, cite the slides as personal communication.

If you want to cite a PowerPoint in MLA or APA style, you need to have basic information including the name of the author(s), title of the presentation, date and place of publication, and URL. For in-text citations, you need to include only the author name(s) in MLA style and author name(s) and year in APA style.  

APA in-text citations

(Author Surname, publication year)

(Dhanalakshmi, 2004)

MLA in-text citations

(Author Surname)

(Dhanalakshmi)

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Note:  This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style  can be found here .

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Select the APA PowerPoint Presentation link above to download slides that provide a detailed review of the APA citation style.

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How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation

Last Updated: January 16, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Gerald Posner and by wikiHow staff writer, Jennifer Mueller, JD . Gerald Posner is an Author & Journalist based in Miami, Florida. With over 35 years of experience, he specializes in investigative journalism, nonfiction books, and editorials. He holds a law degree from UC College of the Law, San Francisco, and a BA in Political Science from the University of California-Berkeley. He’s the author of thirteen books, including several New York Times bestsellers, the winner of the Florida Book Award for General Nonfiction, and has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History. He was also shortlisted for the Best Business Book of 2020 by the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing. There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 66,831 times.

PowerPoint presentations often convey a lot of information in a brief format that's easy to understand. For this reason, they also make excellent sources for a research paper — especially if you're writing on a complex, cutting-edge topic. But how should you cite your source? The elements included in your citation are generally the same as those you would use for any other lecture or presentation. Your specific format will vary, though, depending on whether you're using the Modern Language Association (MLA), American Psychological Association (APA), or Chicago citation style.

Step 1 Start your Works Cited entry with the name of the presenter.

  • Example: Kalyanaraman, Ananth.

Step 2 Add the title of the presentation in quotation marks.

  • Example: Kalyanaraman, Ananth. "CPT S 317: Automata and Formal Languages."

Step 3 Include the date of the presentation and name of the sponsoring organization.

  • Example: Kalyanaraman, Ananth. "CPT S 317: Automata and Formal Languages." 2017. School of EECS, Washington State University, Pullman.

Step 4 Identify the source as a PowerPoint presentation.

  • Example: Kalyanaraman, Ananth. "CPT S 317: Automata and Formal Languages." 2017. School of EECS, Washington State University, Pullman. Microsoft PowerPoint presentation.

Step 5 Provide a direct URL if the presentation is available online.

  • Example: Kalyanaraman, Ananth. "CPT S 317: Automata and Formal Languages." 2017. School of EECS, Washington State University, Pullman. Microsoft PowerPoint presentation. eecs.wsu.edu/~ananth/CptS317/Lectures/Course.pdf.

Step 6 Include the presenter's name and slide number for in-text citations.

  • For example, you might write: One of the objectives of the course is to introduce automata theory and the theory of computation (Kalyanaraman slide 3).

Step 1 Use only an in-text citation if the presentation isn't available online.

  • The basic format for a personal communication in-text citation is as follows: (A. Lastname, personal communication, Month day, year).

Step 2 Start your Reference List entry with the name of the presenter.

  • Example: Braun, M.

Step 3 List the date for the presentation.

  • Example: Braun, M. (2020).

Step 4 Add the title of the presentation and the format.

  • Example: Braun, M. (2020). Diseases of the nervous system [PowerPoint slides].

Step 5 Provide the direct URL for the PowerPoint presentation.

  • Example: Braun, M. (2020). Diseases of the nervous system [PowerPoint slides]. http://medsci.indiana.edu/c602web/602/c602web/opt/braun/Diseases_NervousSystem.pdf

Step 6 Include the presenter's last name and the year for in-text citations.

  • For example, you might write: A subdural hemorrhage is a rotational injury that causes slow bleeding (Braun, 2020).
  • If you use the presenter's name in the text of your paper, add a parenthetical immediately after the name with the year for the presentation. For example, you might write: Braun (2020) differentiates between different types of brain hemorrhages, which require different treatment.
  • If you quote directly from the presentation, add the slide number after the year. For example, you might write: According to Braun (2020, slide 3), the "accumulation of junk" in the central nervous system can lead to problems.

Step 1 Start your Bibliography entry with the presenter's name.

  • Example: Damodaran, Aswath.

Step 2 Add the title of the presentation in quotation marks.

  • Example: Damodaran, Aswath. "Intrinsic Valuation."

Step 3 Include the format, location, and date for the presentation.

  • Example: Damodaran, Aswath. "Intrinsic Valuation." PowerPoint presentation, Equity Instruments, NYU Stern School of Business, New York, NY, January 2020.

Step 4 Close your entry with a direct URL for the presentation.

  • Example: Damodaran, Aswath. "Intrinsic Valuation." PowerPoint presentation, Equity Instruments, NYU Stern School of Business, New York, NY, January 2020. http://people.stern.nyu.edu/adamodar/pdfiles/eqnotes/valpacket1spr20.pdf.

Step 5 Include the same information in footnotes with different formatting.

  • Example: Aswath Damodaran, "Intrinsic Valuation," (PowerPoint presentation, Equity Instruments, NYU Stern School of Business, New York, NY, January 2020), http://people.stern.nyu.edu/adamodar/pdfiles/eqnotes/valpacket1spr20.pdf.
  • After the first footnote, use a shortened format for subsequent footnotes with the last name of the presenter and the title of the presentation. For example:

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • If the slides come from a classroom website, company intranet, or learning management system (such as Canvas or Blackboard), use the URL only if you're writing for an audience that would have access to that system. [18] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

how to properly cite in a powerpoint presentation

  • This article covers how to cite a PowerPoint presentation using the MLA 8th edition (2016), the APA 7th edition (2019), and the Chicago Manual of Style 17th edition (2017). Consult your instructor or editor to make sure you're using the right edition for your citations. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

You Might Also Like

Cite the WHO in APA

  • ↑ https://style.mla.org/citing_slides/
  • ↑ https://research.moreheadstate.edu/c.php?g=610039&p=4234940
  • ↑ https://libguides.capilanou.ca/mla/classnotes
  • ↑ https://writeanswers.royalroads.ca/faq/199089
  • ↑ https://guides.himmelfarb.gwu.edu/APA/lecture
  • ↑ https://apastyle.apa.org/style-grammar-guidelines/references/examples/powerpoint-references
  • ↑ https://libguides.up.edu/chicago/other#s-lg-box-wrapper-28673142
  • ↑ https://library.ulethbridge.ca/chicagostyle/other/lecture
  • ↑ https://libguides.up.edu/chicago/other

About This Article

Gerald Posner

To cite a PowerPoint presentation in MLA, use footnotes or endnotes to cite your sources. Then in the footnote, list the author’s last name followed by a comma then their first name. Then write the title of the lecture in quotes followed by the venue, the city it was held in, and the abbreviated date you accessed the work. You should put a period after each item. For instance, you might write, “Smith, John. ‘Sensitivity and Social Media.’ Today's Social Networks. Thomson Auditorium. Hamilton. Jan. 23, 2016. Keynote address.” To learn how to cite PowerPoint presentations in APA style, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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APA Citation Guide (7th edition) : Powerpoint Presentations

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Powerpoint presentations - what do i need to cite, powerpoint presentations - where do my citations go, other digital assignments - where do my citations go, quick rules for an apa reference list.

Your research paper ends with a list of all the sources cited in the text of the paper. Here are nine quick rules for this Reference list.

  • Start a new page for your Reference list. Centre the title, References, at the top of the page.
  • Double-space the list.
  • Start the first line of each reference at the left margin; indent each subsequent line five spaces (a hanging indent).
  • Put your list in alphabetical order. Alphabetize the list by the first word in the reference. In most cases, the first word will be the author’s last name. Where the author is unknown, alphabetize by the first word in the title, ignoring the words a, an, the.
  • For each author, give the last name followed by a comma and the first (and middle, if listed) initials followed by periods.
  • Italicize the titles of these works: books, audiovisual material, internet documents and newspapers, and the title and volume number of journals and magazines.
  • Do not italicize titles of most parts of works, such as: articles from newspapers, magazines, or journals / essays, poems, short stories or chapter titles from a book / chapters or sections of an Internet document.
  • In titles of non-periodicals (books, videotapes, websites, reports, poems, essays, chapters, etc), capitalize only the first letter of the first word of a title and subtitle, and all proper nouns (names of people, places, organizations, nationalities).
  • If a web source (not from the library) is not a stable archived version, or you are unsure whether it is stable, include a statement of the accessed date before the link.

What am I legally required to cite in my digital assignment?

According to the Copyright Act, you must cite the sources (images, videos, books, websites, etc.) that you used in your digital assignment ( 29.21(1)(b) ). You must cite the source (where you got the information from) and the creator of the content (if available). You must also make sure that any copyrighted materials you used in your assignment meet the conditions set out in section  29.21  of the Copyright Act. For a list of conditions and more information, please visit:  http://studentcopyright.wordpress.com/mashups/

What citation style do I use for the sources in my digital assignment?

There is no one required citation style, so please defer to your instructor's directions and citation style preference.

List your sources in a slide at the end of the Powerpoint presentation, with footnotes throughout your presentation as applicable.

You could also provide a print copy of the sources you used to those attending your presentation.

Seneca Libraries has the following recommendations for how to organize your list of sources for digital assignments. Please check with your instructor first:

Videos you create: 

List your sources in a credits screen at the end of the video.

Websites you create:

  • For images, include a citation under each image using this format “From: XXXX” and then make the image a link back to the original image ( example  - picture of little girl). Or list the citation at the bottom of the web page.
  • For quotes or material from other sources, include an in-text citation that links back to the original material ( example  – second paragraph).

Images you create: 

If possible list your sources at the bottom or side of the image ( example ). Otherwise, include a list of citations alongside the image wherever it’s uploaded (e.g. Flickr, Blackboard).

**Please note that the above are recommendations only and your instructor may have a preference and directions for how and where you list your sources for your assignment.**

If you don't receive specific instructions from your instructor, try to include your citations in a way that doesn't impact the design of your digital assignment.

For more information please contact Seneca Libraries copyright team at  [email protected]

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  • Last Updated: Apr 15, 2024 11:26 AM
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How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA 7?

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How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA 7?

💡 Before we show you how to cite a PowerPoint in APA, we would like to tell you that all examples and explanations are about APA 7th edition .

In your PowerPoint presentation, you’re going to use a combination of texts and images to present information. You’ll need to cite the sources for these documents and media so your audience knows where to find out more about the topic.

This way, you will both adhere to the rules of using copyrighted information and show that your knowledge on the topic is well researched and you have spent time finding the resources.

What we will discuss in this article is the APA standard and how to make a proper PowerPoint citation in APA standard. Let’s dig deep.

Article Overview: 1. What is Apa? 2. Why do people use APA as a standard? 3. How to cite a PowerPoint presentation in APA? 4. How to Cite a Picture in PowerPoint?

1. What is APA?

APA is one of the most popular and widely used styles for writing research papers. This style of writing citations and citing sources is used in most social sciences – mainly psychology, sociology, and education. The acronym comes from A merican P sychological A ssociation. You can check APA’s website for more information .

2. Why do people use APA as a standard?

Before we tell you how to cite a PowerPoint presentation in APA style, we need to clarify the main reason why people use this style. As the most common standard, it is widely accepted around the world, and the manuals have been sold millions of times.

What makes the APA citation style so popular among educational institutions is that it gives “weight” to the documents that are being examined. Adding the sources and using the right way to present the sources could greatly influence the credibility of any thesis or PowerPoint presentation.

3. How to cite a PowerPoint presentation in APA?

There aren’t one or two ways to cite a Powerpoint presentation in APA. Why? Because there are different conditions that can affect the accessibility of the original source. Let’s see some of the most common occasions in citing PowerPoint presentations in APA style.

3.1. Citing a PowerPoint in APA – Accessible Documents

This is probably the best-case scenario for citations, as your readers will have access to the information, thus they can easily find the original source. Bear in mind you should not include PowerPoint presentations in the reference list if your audience cannot access them.

3.1.1. Citing in PowerPoint from public sites

When you have the source and it is an available webpage, you will have to link directly to the original source.

N.B.  You should always  cite the original source. If you have found a piece of statistics somewhere – let’s say a WeForum article , it is not the original source, thus you cannot refer to information that has not been published by the author.

3.1.2. Citing PowerPoints on password-protected portals

When it comes to citing from a university or other password-protected website, you should refer to the login page, as a direct link will lead to it. Let’s see an example I’ve made up myself.

N.B.  Sometimes, there is no author mentioned. In such cases, we proceed in two ways:

  • If there is no author, but an organization that is behind the source:

What we have done is we have replaced the author’s name with the name of the organization that has published the report.

  • If there is an unknown author.

In case there’s an unknown author, we replace their name with the title.

3.2. Citing a PowerPoint in APA – Inaccessible Documents

In case your PowerPoint slide is inaccessible to readers, then you have the option to cite the source as personal communication. Let’s see how this happens.

During the presentation, Peterson made a prediction that low-fare airlines will become dominant by 2030 (personal communication, June 3, 2022).

You can add personal communication citations in parentheses somewhere in the text but not in the reference list, as the original source cannot be directly tracked.

3.3. Citing a PowerPoint Slide

Sometimes, a slide during a presentation makes a great impression and you want to add it to your sources. When this happens, it’s better to cite the original source, rather than the PowerPoint slide itself, because of the requirements we discussed in 3.1.1.

4. How to Cite a Picture in PowerPoint?

If you want to learn how to cite a picture in PowerPoint in APA format, then you should apply some different techniques. What you need to do first is to have a very detailed look at the terms and conditions of the original image. Some images require attribution while others don’t.

Once you insert the image, you need to then create a new text box, align it at the center and write the following:

Figure 1. Image Description. Adapted from SOURCE . Retrieved from  SOURCE LINK.  Copyright by  COMPANY NAME COPYRIGHTS  (located at the bottom).

Let’s see how it’s done in practice.

How to cite a PowerPoint example

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Learning how to cite a PowerPoint presentation correctly is crucial if you are submitting your thesis or working on a serious project. The APA style has specific rules that should be followed for your presentations or paper dissertations to look formatted and credible.

If you found our content useful, why don’t you check some of our other tutorials related to PowerPoint and presentations in general:

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Nikolay Kaloyanov

Nikolay is a copywriter with vast experience in Technology, Marketing, and Design. When he isn't playing with words and crafting texts, he watches sports and asks questions. He is a funny person...until you put him on a diet.

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APA Style, 7th Edition

  • Sample Papers & How to Videos
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  • Online Lecture Notes or PowerPoint Slides
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APA for PowerPoint Presentations

Using powerpoint for beginners.

The APA manual does not have a section on how to format a PowerPoint presentation, but y ou can follow APA style guidelines within your PowerPoint . For example:

  • Include the same information on your title slide that you would have on a title page. 
  • Include in-text citations for any quote, paraphrase, image, graph, table, data, audio or video file that you use within your presentation. Please note that photographs are considered figures in APA style. 
  • The last slide will be your References List. 
  • “No citation, permission, or copyright attribution is necessary for clip art from programs like Microsoft Word or PowerPoint” (American Psychological Association [APA], 2020, p. 346).
  • Do not reproduce images without permission from the creator or owner of the image. See section 12.15 of the APA manual for more information about this.

Resource: Goodwin University Library. 2019. How to format a PowerPoint presentation in APA Style. Goodwin University.   https://goodwin.libguides.com/apastyle   

  • Citing Business Sources in APA Style Brock University's guide to citing business information sources according the the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 7th edition. Includes citing sources in presentations
  • << Previous: Additional APA Resources
  • Last Updated: May 15, 2024 10:00 AM
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APA Citation Guide (7th Edition): Presentations and Class Notes

  • Audiovisual Media
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In-Text Citation or Reference List?

Handouts distributed in class and presentation slides such as PowerPoint should be cited both in-text and on the Reference list.

Your own notes from lectures are considered personal communications in APA style. They are cited within the text of your assignment, but do not get an entry on the Reference list.

Presentation Slides from a Website

Author, A. A. (Year, Month Date). Title of presentation  [Lecture notes, PowerPoint Slides, etc.]. Publisher. URL

Kunka, J. L. (n.d.). Conquering the comma [PowerPoint presentation]. Purdue Online Writing Lab. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/workshops/pp/index.html#presentations

Presentation Slides from WebCampus (Canvas)

Instructor, I. I. (Year Presentation Was Created).  Title of presentation  [PowerPoint presentation]. WebCampus. URL

Graham, J. (2013).  Introduction: Jean Watson  [PowerPoint presentation]. WebCampus. https://unr.instructure.com/login/canvas

Note : The first letter of the word Watson is capitalized as it is part of a person's name.

Class Handouts from WebCampus (Canvas)

Instructor, I. I. (Year Handout Was Created if known).  Title of handout  [Class handout]. WebCampus. URL

Magowan , A. (2013).  Career resources at the library   [Class handout]. WebCampus. https://unr.instructure.com/login/canvas

Class Handout in Print

Instructor, I. I. (Year Handout Was Created if known).  Title of handout  [Class handout]. University Name, Course code.

Wood, D. (2013).  Laboratory safety overview  [Class handout]. University of Nevada, Reno,  BIO173.

Class Lectures (Notes from)

Note : Your own notes from a lecture are considered personal communications in APA style. They are cited within the text of your assignment, but do not get an entry on the Reference list. Put the citation right after a quote or paraphrased content from the class lecture.

(I. I. Instructor who gave lecture, personal communication, Month Day, Year lecture took place)

"Infections are often contracted while patients are recovering in the hospital" (J. D. Black, personal communication, May 30, 2012).

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APA Citation Guide (7th Edition)

  • What's New in the 7th Edition - Handouts!
  • APA Citation Resources
  • Basic Information
  • Bias-Free Language
  • When Information Is Missing
  • Ethics Code
  • Figures/Images
  • Media Sources
  • Reference Lists
  • Finding the DOI
  • Formating a PowerPoint presentation in APA Style
  • Academic Integrity & Plagiarism
  • Academic Writer This link opens in a new window

How to format a PowerPoint presentation in APA Style:

The APA manual does not have a section on how to format a PowerPoint presentation, but y ou can follow APA style guidelines within your PowerPoint . For example:

  • Include the same information on your title slide that you would have on a title page. 
  • Include in-text citations for any quote, paraphrase, image, graph, table, data, audio or video file that you use within your presentation. Please note that photographs are considered figures in APA style. See section 7.30 of the APA manual for more information about this.
  • The last slide will be your References List. 
  • “No citation, permission, or copyright attribution is necessary for clip art from programs like Microsoft Word or PowerPoint” (American Psychological Association [APA], 2020, p. 346).
  • Do not reproduce images without permission from the creator or owner of the image. See section 12.15 of the APA manual for more information about this.

How to cite PowerPoint slides in your References List

You will use the following format to cite PowerPoint slides:

Author, A. A. (year).  Title of presentation  [PowerPoint slides]. Website Name. https://xxxxx

Please note that “if the slides come from a classroom website, learning management system [e.g., Blackboard], or company intranet and you are writing for an audience with access to that resource, provide the name of the site and its URL (use the login page URL for sites requiring login)” (APA, 2020, p. 347). Don't forget to indent the second and subsequent lines.

Goodwin University. (n.d.).  Social media and marketing communications: Written/Oral project outline . [PowerPoint slides]. Blackboard. https://goodwin.blackboard.com

  • << Previous: Finding the DOI
  • Next: Academic Integrity & Plagiarism >>
  • Last Updated: Feb 29, 2024 10:11 AM
  • URL: https://goodwin.libguides.com/apastyle

APA 7th Edition Citation Examples

  • Volume and Issue Numbers
  • Page Numbers
  • Undated Sources
  • Citing a Source Within a Source
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  • Encyclopedia Articles
  • Book, Film, and Product Reviews
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  • Technical + Research Reports
  • Court Decisions
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  • Federal Regulations: I. The Code of Federal Regulations
  • Federal Regulations: II. The Federal Register
  • Executive Orders
  • Charter of the United Nations
  • Federal Statutes
  • Dissertations and Theses
  • Interviews, E-mail Messages + Other Personal Communications
  • Social Media
  • Business Sources

Format for PowerPoint presentations

How to format your powerpoint in apa style.

  • AI: ChatGPT, etc.

Author last name, first initial. (Date). Title of the PowerPoint  [PowerPoint slides]. Host site. URL

Thomes, C. (n.d.). UMGC Library APA citation basics [PowerPoint slides]. University of Maryland Global Campus. https://libguides.umgc.edu/ld.php?content_id=68264148

In-text citation:

(Thomes, n.d.)

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How to Cite a Website, Book, YouTube Video, etc. in PowerPoint

  • PowerPoint Tutorials
  • Miscellaneous
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  • August 16, 2019

Citing a source in a report or paper is pretty easy – you just give the source details according to a particular style of citation.

But, when it comes to presentations and speeches, do you know how to correctly cite your sources?

It seems like quite a basic question at first, but when it comes to the practicalities and technicalities, the answers aren’t so easy to come by.

how to properly cite in a powerpoint presentation

Sure, quotes may be simple enough to introduce, but what about all the other information, data, facts, figures, and images you use? Do you know how to present that information and give proper legal credit without disrupting the flow of your presentation?

No? Then read on!

Important Legal Note:  This is not legal advice. For full details on copyright laws and Fair Use licenses, please check the  US Copyright Office .

Table of Contents

Why citing your sources is important.

Your audience needs to know where the information, visuals, or any other materials you use in your presentation come from.

Very often our presentations and speeches are informed by or based on the work of others and this needs to be acknowledged. Likewise, audio, visual, or video is copyright protected.

Citing sources and creative owners can also help keep you on the right side of copyright law and fair use licenses….more on this below.

Make your work more credible

Citing gives your audience a good impression by proving how well you know your stuff. By attributing work to the rightful owners, you also show integrity.

A well-cited presentation appears well-researched and properly developed; and hence, it’s often better delivered, and better received.

Give the audience access to information

The whole point of a presentation or speech is to share knowledge. By citing your sources, you give your audience the opportunity to learn more about your subject and do their own research if they so wish.

Citations and Copyright

If you use someone else’s copyrighted material in your presentation without citing the creator – or if you cite them incorrectly – you may likely be guilty of copyright infringement.

Copyright infringement is only 100% avoided by getting the copyright owner’s explicit permission.

You can, however, use copyrighted material without permission if you can show that it doesn’t infringe on Fair Use.

To learn more about Fair Use, see this article  here  on the U.S. Copyright Office website.

This can be a rather gray area, as what is considered to be ‘fair use’ can be open to interpretation. Generally speaking, Fair Use takes into consideration the following:

  • the purpose and character of the use
  • the profit or nonprofit cause
  • the nature of the protected work
  • how much of the work is used
  • how the use affects the value or future demand of the work

For example, if you use a copyrighted photograph just because it looks cool, use it as your background image on a PowerPoint slide, or repeatedly use it so that it becomes associated with your brand, then this is not Fair Use.

how to properly cite in a powerpoint presentation

If you use the photograph to make a point, illustrate an idea, or for educational purposes, and also give proper accreditation to the copyright owner even if you don’t have permission, then that might be considered Fair Use and would probably be fine.

How to do in-text citations in PowerPoint

In-text citations are citations you see on the screen, and are often in the same format you’d see in a written report.

If your slide refers to a study, for example, you will need to add the copyright details. To do that, simply add the name of the author, the work and the publication in parentheses after the reference.

For example, in parenthesis: (Author, Date).

An example slide that uses in-text citation to quote an author.

This is particularly useful when presenting quotes or insightful facts and figures that support your message.

Note: This type of citation sometimes doesn’t leave enough room for all the information you need to provide. In this case, you can add a Sources slide at the very end of your presentation

Adding footnote citations

You can also use footnotes on your PowerPoint slides to give citations.

Next to the text you would like to reference, add the number ‘ 1 ’ for your first citation. Highlight it, and then from the ‘Home’ option, open the Font box and select ‘ Subscript ’ and click on ‘ OK ’.

Demonstration of how to add a footnote citation in a text box on your slide.

Then, click on ‘ Insert ,’ select a text box and then draw it onto your slide. Enter the same number as you used in the text, and type your source details. You will likely want to reduce the size of the text.

Example of a slide with a footnote citation.

Note: When I talk about footnotes here, I don’t mean the Header & Footer feature in PowerPoint. You can write your citations inside the Footer placeholder, but keep in mind that the text you type in here will display on every slide that has the Footer enabled.

Verbal citation during a presentation

For some material, you may choose not to give an in-text citation, but rather give credit verbally. Be sure to introduce the source before you present the information and keep it brief so that it doesn’t slow down the flow of your presentation.

Here are some example phrases:

  • According to Dr. Richards, professor of Such and Such at This University,…
  • John Dean, author of the 2015 study, A Study of Something, argues that…
  • Jane Gordons, a journalist writing for the New York Times, offers this example….

Use speaker notes to help you cite verbally

It is a good idea to add the full citation details in the speaker notes so that you make sure you relay the correct details.

Also it ensures that the full citations will be seen should you share your slides with audience or team members after the presentation, or print them.

How to cite a website

If you are wondering how to cite websites, that’s probably because not all websites provide the authors name for you to cite (making it a bit more difficult).

If you can’t find the website authors name you can instead cite the website’s address. And you don’t have to copy and paste the whole URL when citing websites either.

When citing a website, you just need to give enough information so that your audience knows where the information came from and how to get more details if they want to check it out.

Here are the common elements you’ll need to properly cite a website in your presentation:

  • Website or author name
  • Page name or article title
  • Exact URL of website
  • Page date of publication

See the cited website example in the picture below.

Example of how to cite a website in PowerPoint

How to cite a picture or image

There are countless places for pictures that are available for free and public use according to Creative Commons licensing. You can search  Flickr  and  Google Advanced Image Search  by filtering the results by ‘Creative Commons’.

There are also sites providing stock images which are royalty free and can be used without attribution, such as  Pixabay  or  Pexels .

Always check the licensing agreements, as some images may have ‘some rights reserved’ or specific requirements for citations.

The common elements you’ll need when citing a picture are:

  • Creator’s name
  • Title of the picture
  • Date and location of publication
  • Publisher or website
  • Picture URL

To create the citation in PowerPoint, you can insert a small text box and add the details in a readable way, as you can see in the example below.

Example of a slide citing a picture in the footer

To learn how to crop a picture in PowerPoint into different shapes as pictured above,  read our guide here .

How to cite a YouTube video

While YouTube is a free online streaming service, you shouldn’t assume that you can use anyone’s video without properly citing it.

Here are the common elements you’ll need to create a YouTube video citation:

  • Creator’s name or screen name
  • Video title
  • Website name
  • Publication date

Whichever citation method you use, should at a minimum credit the creator of the video (real name if possible, but their username will suffice), and the year the video was posted. For example: (Nuts & Bolts Speed Training, 2014).

In the notes for full referencing, you’ll need more details:

Author/Username. (month, day, year). Title of video (Video file). Retrieved from  http://URL.com .

Example of a slide citing a YouTube video

Nuts & Bolts Speed Training. (June 25, 2014). 4 PowerPoint Tricks You Don’t Know (Video File). Retrieved from  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05OW0Ce8rT8 .

How to cite a book

Books are another common reference material you’ll want to properly cite in your presentations.

Here are the common elements you’ll need when citing a book (same-same for a magazine):

  • Author name
  • Publication date and location
  • Publisher name

If you are paraphrasing from a book, include an in-text citation of the author and the year (Brown, 2005) or the author, year and the page number (Brown, 2005, p.13), immediately following the text.

Example of how to cite a book in a PowerPoint presentation

Another option for your citation, is to include them in Speaker Notes so that if you print your notes as handouts, the speaker notes will appear there.

NOTE: For help printing your speaker notes, see our guide on Printing PowerPoint with speaker notes .

How to cite a lecture (talk or speech)

Like for books and quotes, the in-text citation will need the author’s last name and the year the speech or talk was presented, written in parenthesis: (Gordon, 2017).

In your PowerPoint notes, it should be fully cited with the name, year, title of the talk and the format, and where it took place. For example:

Gordon, B. (2017). The Theory Behind Big Business. Presentation, Atlanta.

Example of a slide with a footer citation for a speech or lecture.

How to cite a song

When it comes to using a song in your presentation, there are a many variables as to whether it’s an infringement of copyright laws. Unauthorized use of a song can be allowed under the concept of ‘fair use’ as detailed above.

If you are in any doubt, obtain the license or get permission. The process is relatively straightforward and doesn’t always mean a hefty fee. Sometimes, it’s as simple as asking and getting permission or making sure you acknowledge the copyright owner.

You can give acknowledgment on the PowerPoint Slide with in-text citation on the appropriate slide or as a ‘sources slide’ at the end of your presentation:

Example of a slide with a footer citation for a song.

To get permission, here are three main licensing companies that you can contact for further info: 

  • ASCAP ( American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers )
  • BMI ( Broadcast Music Incorporated )
  • SOCAN ( Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada )

How to cite a presentation

If you want to include a slide or information gained from another PowerPoint presentation that has been published, you can use an in-text citation just as if you were citing a book.

To cite a presentation, simply cite the author’s name and the year the presentation was produced, (Dean, 2007).

In the notes you’ll add the details of “PowerPoint slides”, when it was “Retrieved from” and the URL. It should look something like this:

Example of how to cite a presentation in PowerPoint

How to cite a quote

In the same way as you would quote from a book, an in-text citation with the author of the quote is fine.

Some quotes from historical source won’t have a book, page number or publisher to cite. In these cases, the author name (and year if possible) is sufficient.

Example of a slide with a footer citation for a quote.

Note:  Make sure that you thoroughly check the quote’s source if you find the quote online.

There are far too many misquoted and misattributed sayings out there and there’s nothing more embarrassing than citing the wrong person in your presentation.

So that’s how to cite a variety of different sources in your PowerPoint presentations including:

  • How to cite books
  • How to cite websites
  • How to cite YouTube videos
  • And a bunch of other sources

While in-text citation may take a little more work, it is better than keeping all of your sources in the conclusion. That’s because the end of your presentation should be punchy, memorable, and leave your audience with a good impression (see our tips for how to end a presentation  here ).

This is particularly true as, your audience isn’t able to flip back to see which citation goes with which image, quote, video, website, etc. Giving them the details at the same time as the material allows them to take note of it there and then.

It’s a small detail but makes a huge difference when it comes to delivering a seamless and informative presentation.

If you enjoyed this ultimate guide to citing sources in PowerPoint, you’ll love our other PowerPoint training course and resources that you can  check out here .

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How to Cite PowerPoint Presentations in APA Format

If you're going to include knowledge from a PowerPoint or Keynote presentation in your paper, it must be cited properly.

The APA (American Psychological Association) style  is followed by all kinds of academic institutions, journals, articles, and books. But nowadays, information isn't only found in books and on websites. PowerPoint and Keynote presentations hold tons of knowledge.

And yes, if you're going to include that knowledge in your papers, it must be cited properly. But like all things, there are particular rules of citation you have to follow.

How to Cite PowerPoint Presentations

1. Cite in References.  Include it in the References list like any other online file (e.g. PDF) but mention the file format in brackets and the "Retrieved from" URL pointer.

The APA Style recommends this format for published presentations available on the web:

For example:

2. Cite it in-text. You can also treat the presentation as personal communication and cite it in-text when the slides are from your teacher and not available on the web.

Cite a presentation the same way you would cite any other example of personal communication. Use the author's last name and the year of the presentation in brackets. Give as precise a date as possible.

APA Style recommends this format:

A few more things to keep in mind:

  • APA does not provide specific rules for direct quoting of the exact PowerPoint slides.
  • When you are paraphrasing an idea from another work as above, you only have to make reference to the author and date of publication in your in-text citation. You can use the " n.d " notation when no date is given.
  • APA style rules also say that authors have to use the past tense or present perfect tense when using phrases to describe earlier research.

Use these basic guidelines. The Purdue Online Writing Lab has an excellent and concise guide for APA Style usage with more scenarios clearly explained.

Do you find citing sources cumbersome and confusing? Have you managed to master it with practice?

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Citing Business Sources in APA Style

7. citing sources in presentations.

  • 1. About this guide
  • 2. Citing references in-text
  • 3. Citing sources in your reference list
  • 4. Reference List Examples: Brock Library Business Databases
  • 5. Reference List Examples: Statistical Sources
  • 6. Reference List Examples: Audiovisual Sources

7.3: Using Reference Lists in Presentations

7.4: apa style powerpoint help.

  • The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA Style) was designed to assist writers in preparing research papers (such as journal articles) and therefore does not actually contain any guidelines on preparing powerpoint presentations according to APA Style.
  • Typically, if you are required to create a presentation according to APA Style, you should clarify with your professor if he/she actually just expects you to put your in-text citations and references in APA Style.

7.1: In-text citations in Presentations

  • You can cite references within the text of your presentation slide using the same APA format for in-text citations (Author, Date) as in a written essay.
  • Remember to cite sources for direct quotations, paraphrased materials, and sources of facts (such as market share data in the example slide).
  • Your Reference List must include the sources cited on your presentation slides.

Sample APA in-text citations

7.2: Using Images on Slides

If you use images, such as photographs or clipart, on your slides, you should also credit the source of the image. Do not reproduce images without permission. There are sources for clipart and images that are "public use" according to Creative Commons licensing such as:

  • Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/
  • Google Advanced Image Search allows you so filter results by usage rights (e.g., free to use or share):  https://www.google.com/advanced_image_search
  • ClipSafari:  https://www.clipsafari.com
  • Openclipart.org:  https://openclipart.org/
  • Noun Project:  https://thenounproject.com   (free membership, must give credit to creator of icon following a specific format)

Photographs are treated as figures in APA Style. Therefore, the citation for the source of the image is included as a footnote in the figure caption underneath the photograph which includes the figure number and a description. The source of the image obtained is attributed using the following model:

Figure 1. Blah blah blah. From Title of Image , by Author, Year. Retrieved from URL.

Infinite loop sculpture

Figure 1. Photograph of a sculpture in Cupertino, California. From Infinite Loop II by Kurafire (2007, January 3).  Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/kurafire/343629962/.

Another option for citing image sources is to create a separate slide titled "Photo credits" or "Image Sources". For more assistance on the various ways to cite images in presentations (but not necessarily in APA format), see:

  • Image Citation Guide (UBC Copyright Office)
  • How to credit photos (Photoshare.org). Provides examples of various ways to credit image sources in Powerpoint, on webpages, and in print materials.
  • How to cite clip art or stock image references (APA Style website) Consult the APA Style site for the latest guidance on how to cite images according to the 7th edition.

Option 1: Create a References handout (recommended)

Option 2: Create a References slide (if you only have a few items in your list)

  • use a large enough font (e.g., 24 points)
  • limit to 12 lines of text on each slide

References

  • Power up your PowerPoint (gradPSYCH at APA.org) Seven research-backed tips for effective presentations. Includes links to digital extras: "the worst PowerPoint presentation ever made" and "Comedian Don McMillan's PowerPoint pet peeves".
  • << Previous: 6. Reference List Examples: Audiovisual Sources
  • Last Updated: Apr 17, 2024 8:34 AM
  • URL: https://researchguides.library.brocku.ca/APABusiness

PSY 240 - Online - Developmental Psychology: Citing in Powerpoint Presentations

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Simple APA Citation within Powerpoint

  • Sample PowerPoint

APA does not offer specific advice on how to cite within a PowerPoint.  But one can assume that a PowerPoint is simply a paper and that all the rules that apply to a paper apply to the PowerPoint.  In-text citations (or parenthetical citations) point your viewer to specific entries on the References page.

With that said, general rules must be followed.

  • One must create parenthetical citations whenever you quote, paraphrase, or summarize information from another source.
  • The parenthetical citations is generally located at the end of the sentence (before the period), or as close as possible to the text which you quoted, paraphrased, or summarized.  
  • One must create parenthetical citations for all graphics used.
  • The PowerPoint presentation must have a slide that is the References page .  Normally this would be the last slide.
  • References on the slide are formatted exactly as they would be formatted for the References page of a paper. 

Below is a Sample PowerPoint in which APA format is used .  Remember that the placement of the parenthetical citation on a slide is not absolute.  However, it should be apparent to the viewer where the information is coming from. 

Citing a Youtube Video

In APA a Youtube video is best cited as a video blog post. 

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How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation

3 ways to cite a powerpoint presentation, step-by-step instructions on how to cite a powerpoint presentation.

How to cite a powerpoint? Today, a PowerPoint presentation is one of the essential visual methods to deliver information in a modern educational process. It is often used during the presentation of new educational material, to control how efficient the students master the skills, and in other educational situations. Thanks to the picturesque state of the text and illustrated material, a presentation boosts students’ imaginations, a creative approach to education, and allows teachers to make the lesson more productive and emotionally rich.

A mandatory part of academic writing is a properly created list of the sources used. While analyzing the sources you acknowledge in the project, it can be concluded how deeply and comprehensively the topic is studied, whether the information used is still relevant, etc. Since you can use a professor’s presentation or any online one, it is important to know how to cite a PowerPoint presentation properly. The correct list of sources or bibliographic references is also an expression of scientific ethics and a culture of scientific work.

There are a few citation styles available, and it is always a good idea to check with your editor to find out which one he prefers. MLA, APA, and Chicago are the most widely-used styles to cite your sources. Let’s find out what exactly every style means.

How to cite a Powerpoint Presentation in MLA format

MLA style is the most widely used format of documenting and citing a powerpoint of sources in the field of humanities. It was developed by the Modern Language Association and used in the USA, Canada, and other countries to create academic writings on English language and literature, spelling, research works including comparative analysis, literary criticism, media studies, religion, and other related disciplines. The style offers its own guides on in-text citation, works cited in a PowerPoint standard, and MLA annotated.

How to cite a Powerpoint Presentation in APA format:

APA style was created in 1929 by the American Psychological Association. Their goal was to create simple and clear rules for the formatting of scientific publications. Currently, its 6th edition is available. The style is widely used in term papers, research reports, technical and economic analyses, literary reviews, methodological articles, etc.

APA citing rules are based on the system author-date, so inside the text, you specify the author's name and date in the abbreviated form.

How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in Chicago Style

Chicago style was first published in 1906 by the University of Chicago Press. Its 17th edition is currently available. The guidebook is updated on the basis of editorial practice and covers all aspects ranging from American English grammar to the preparation of the document.

The peculiarity of this style is that you may either specify the full source in a footnote and in a bibliography or mention the abbreviation of the source in author-date format in the text and specify the full source in the bibliography list at the end.

Cite a PowerPoint Presentation

Before citing a PowerPoint presentation, you need to make sure you have all the necessary information handy. You will need the following presentation data:

  • URL (if available)

MLA, APA, and Chicago citation styles dictate their own rules for citing PowerPoint presentations. Let’s look through the step-by-step instructions on how to insert references in PowerPoint.

monsterone powerpoint bundle

MLA style suggests that you use footnotes or endnotes.

  • You can use a number in superscript when you refer to the presentation and specify the citation at the bottom of the page. If you decide to proceed with endnotes - include a work cited in a PowerPoint with the list of the presentation sources at the end of the paper, rather than on each page.
  • Do not hesitate to specify the name of the presenter. If you refer to a digital presentation, make sure you know who the author is. E.g. Baker, John
  • Let’s pretend you want to refer to the presentation you saw at a lecture. That’s fine, and you can mention the event itself. E.g. Baker, John. “Nature pollution”. Grand Hall. Paris. Jan. 27, 2010.
  • If you saw a presentation on the computer, specify the type of digital medium and the date it was created. E.g. Baker, John. “Nature pollution”. Jan. 27, 2010. PowerPoint presentation.

APA style suggests that you use in-text citations with no footnotes/endnotes.

  • Whenever you are using some abstract from the presentation in your paper, mention this in the brackets right in the text. Include the last name of the presenter and the year of the presentation. E.g. (Baker, 2010).
  • Create an alphabetical reference list at the back of your paper. No need to repeat the same source twice.
  • The last name should go first, comma should go after, and finally the first initial of the first name with a period at the end. E.g. “Baker, J.”
  • The date is also important. Put it in the round brackets followed by a period at the end. E.g. "Baker, J. (2010).”
  • After you mention the name and the year, specify the title in italics and the presentation type in square brackets. E.g. Baker, J. (2010). Nature pollution (in italics). [PowerPoint slides].
  • Online PowerPoint presentation allows you to mention the URL. Write "Retrieved from" before the URL is added. E.g. Baker, J. (2010). Nature pollution (in italics). [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from www.johnbakerpowerpoint.org

Chicago style suggests that you use footnotes or endnotes for referencing a PowerPoint presentation.

  • It is essential to use a superscript number and refer to the full citation either at the bottom of the page or at the end of the paper.
  • Specify the name of the author and the title of the presentation. E.g. John Baker, “Nature pollution", […]
  • Make sure you mention that it is a PowerPoint presentation. E.g. John Baker, “Nature pollution", PowerPoint presentation,[…]
  • Specify the website/date you accessed it/URL. E.g. John Baker, “Nature pollution", John Baker Presentations Online, January 27, 2010. www.johnbakerpowerpoint.org
  • Location should not be missed if you saw a live presentation. E.g. John Baker, “Nature pollution", PowerPoint presentation, Global Eco Conference, Grand Hall. Paris.

As you can see, it is simple enough to work with referencing PowerPoint presentations.

If your job or studies require creating powerful presentations, I would like to bring your attention to a collection of custom-made PowerPoint templates for every taste and purpose. Make a run through the list of available ones and pick up the best template for your project.

how to properly cite in a powerpoint presentation

Conclusion: how to cite a powerpoint

We have just looked through three of the most popular styles to cite a presentation in your project. Now you know the answer to the question, “How do you cite a PowerPoint presentation?” Feel free to follow the instructions provided and share the tutorial with those who might be interested in it.

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How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation FAQ

There are three styles to cite a PowerPoint presentation . This is MLA, APA and Chicago. Each of these styles has a different form of citation. So, choose a more convenient variant for you, and follow the citation rules that are specified in the article.

The Chicago style offers a choice of several formats. Within the style, it is allowed to mix ways of referencing the source, provided that the resulting text is clear and consistent: Author/date, also known as scientific style and social science style: start with the last name, first name of the author, the date, and the title of the lecture. Notes/Bibliography, also known as Humanities Style. References to sources are given in footnotes on the page and/or in the bibliography list.

Detailed information about what kind of information you need to know can be found in the description of each style. But often used: Author/authors of the presentation; presentation title; date of presentation; URL.

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Locating and Using Images for Presentations and Coursework

  • Free & Open Source Images
  • How to Cite Images
  • Alt Text Image Descriptions

Copyright Resources

  • Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States from Cornell University Library
  • Copyright Overview from Purdue University
  • U.S. Copyright Office
  • Fair Use Evaluator
  • Visual Resources Association's Statement of Fair Use of Images for Teaching, Research, and Study
  • Creative Commons Licenses

Attribution

Again, the majority of images you find are under copyright and cannot be used without permission from the creator. There are exceptions with Fair Use, but this Libguide is intended to help you locate images you can use with attribution (and in some case, the images are free to use without attribution when stated, such as with stock images from pixabay). ***Please read about public domain . These images aren't under copyright, but it's still good practice to include attribution if the information is available. Attribution : the act of attributing something, especially the ascribing of a work (as of literature or art) to a particular author or artist. When you have given proper attribution, it means you have given the information necessary for people to know who the creator of the work is.

Citation General Guidelines

Include as much of the information below when citing images in a paper and formal presentations. Apply the appropriate citation style (see below for APA, MLA examples).

  • Image creator's name (artist, photographer, etc.)
  • Title of the image
  • Date the image (or work represented by the image) was created
  • Date the image was posted online
  • Date of access (the date you accessed the online image)
  • Institution (gallery, museum) where the image is located/owned (if applicable)
  • Website and/or Database name

Citing Images in MLA, APA, Chicago, and IEEE

  • Directions for citing in MLA, APA, and Chicago MLA: Citing images in-text, incorporating images into the text of your paper, works cited APA 6th ed.: Citing images in-text and reference list Chicago 17th ed.: Citing images footnotes and endnotes and bibliography from Simon Fraser University
  • How to Cite Images Using IEEE from the SAIT Reg Erhardt Library
  • Image, Photograph, or Related Artwork (IEEE) from the Rochester Institute of Technology Library

Citing Images in Your PPT

Currently, citing images in PPT is a bit of the Wild West. If details aren't provided by an instructor, there are a number of ways to cite. What's most important is that if the image is not a free stock image, you give credit to the author for the work. Here are some options:

1. Some sites, such as Creative Commons and Wikimedia, include the citation information with the image. Use that citation when available. Copy the citation and add under the image. For example, an image of a lake from Creative Commons has this citation next to it:  "lake"  by  barnyz  is licensed under  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 .

2. Include a marker, such as Image 1. or Figure 1., and in the reference section, include full citation information with the corresponding number

3. Include a complete citation (whatever the required format, such as APA) below the image

4. Below the image, include the link to the online image location

5. Hyperlink the title of the image with the online image location

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How to Embed a YouTube Video in PowerPoint: Step-by-Step Guide

Embedding a YouTube video in PowerPoint can transform a dull slideshow into an engaging presentation. To embed a YouTube video, we need to first locate the video on YouTube, copy its URL, and then paste it into PowerPoint using the ‘Insert’ tab. It’s a straightforward process that anyone can master with a bit of guidance.

A computer screen with a PowerPoint slide open, showing the YouTube logo and a video embed code box

Imagine capturing your audience’s attention with a dynamic video clip relevant to your topic. Instead of flipping through static slides, the energy shifts when we introduce multimedia. Visual elements like videos can illustrate concepts more effectively than text alone, making our presentations much more captivating.

We’ve all sat through monotonous presentations that felt like watching paint dry. By embedding a YouTube video, we instantly elevate the quality of our presentation. Whether it’s for educational purposes or a business pitch, this simple method can make a significant difference in how our message is received. And trust me, it’s easier than you might think!

  • 1.1 Incorporating Multimedia Elements
  • 1.2 Optimizing Videos for Viewer Engagement
  • 1.3 Effective Use of Internet Resources
  • 1.4 Designing for Audience Interaction
  • 2.1 Structuring Your Slide Deck
  • 2.2 Employing Effective Transition Techniques
  • 2.3 Leveraging PowerPoint’s Advanced Features
  • 3.1 Using the Insert Tab for Online Videos
  • 3.2 Troubleshooting Common Video Playback Issues
  • 4.1 Understanding Video Formats and Compatibility
  • 4.2 Adjusting Playback Settings for a Smooth Experience

Creating Engaging Presentations with PowerPoint

Creating engaging presentations with PowerPoint is about combining multimedia elements with strategic design to connect effectively with your audience. Thoughtful use of videos, properly optimized, can significantly enhance the viewer’s experience and drive your message home.

Incorporating Multimedia Elements

We all know that an engaging PowerPoint presentation often goes beyond text and images. Including multimedia elements like YouTube videos can make your slides more dynamic and interactive. Videos offer a break from static text while providing visual and auditory stimulation.

One way to incorporate multimedia is by embedding YouTube videos . This ensures the presentation remains seamless without needing to exit PowerPoint. Simply navigate to the Insert tab, select Online Video , and paste your video link. Adjusting the size and placement of the video ensures it blends well with other content.

Optimizing Videos for Viewer Engagement

Embedding videos is a start, but optimizing those videos is crucial for engagement. We should consider the start and end times to focus on the most relevant content. This keeps your message concise and impactful.

Think about the settings too. Autofill the video to play automatically or set it to start with a cursor click. This lends you control over how and when the video commences. Ensuring the video is of high quality without buffering issues is also paramount, requiring a stable internet connection.

Effective Use of Internet Resources

The internet is an endless resource for enriching our presentations. Aside from embedding YouTube videos , using online images, graphs, and templates can make a presentation more informative and engaging. Leveraging these resources saves time while enhancing the quality.

For instance, websites like Unsplash and Pexels provide high-resolution images for free. Integrating tools and plugins like Poll Everywhere for live audience polling can also foster interaction. Citing resources effectively ensures the credibility of the information shared.

Designing for Audience Interaction

Designing a presentation isn’t just about visuals; it’s about interaction. Engaging the audience keeps them invested. Consider using interactive elements like quizzes or Q&A sections within your slides. This promotes an interactive environment.

Use animations sparingly to highlight key points without overwhelming the audience. A clear and clean design keeps attention focused on the message. When sharing the presentation, providing a share button or easy-access links allows the audience to revisit your content effortlessly.

Crafting outstanding presentations involves these tactics to ensure that your slides are not just visually appealing but also resonate with your audience, maximizing engagement and retention.

Mastering Slide Management and Organization

By optimizing our slide management, we can create an engaging, professional look for our PowerPoint presentation. This section covers essential techniques for structuring slides effectively, using transitions, and leveraging advanced features.

Structuring Your Slide Deck

A well-structured slide deck is essential for conveying our message clearly. We start by establishing a logical flow:

  • Introduction: Welcome and set the stage.
  • Main Content: Present data, insights, and analysis in a sequence.
  • Conclusion: Summarize and call to action.

Organize slides to build smoothly between ideas, ensuring each slide supports the core message.

Using bullet points and succinct text enhances readability and retention. Besides, incorporating headings and subheadings provides structure, guiding our audience through the presentation. We keep slide titles consistent and use formatting to highlight key points.

Employing Effective Transition Techniques

Transitions can add a polished feel to our presentation when used effectively. They should be smooth and purposeful, not distracting.

  • Fade: Perfect for a subtle, professional touch.
  • Push: Useful for introducing new sections.
  • Wipe: Gives a sense of continuation.

We balance transitions to maintain engagement without overwhelming the audience. Animations enhance the flow but keeping them simple and relevant is key. Customizing the duration can make transitions feel seamless and natural.

Leveraging PowerPoint’s Advanced Features

PowerPoint offers advanced features that can boost our presentation significantly. Embedding multimedia like YouTube videos can captivate our audience.

Adjusting these elements adds a professional touch and keeps the audience engaged without being gimmicky.

By mastering these aspects of slide management and organization, we can create compelling and effective PowerPoint presentations that leave a lasting impression.

Embedding Online Videos in PowerPoint

Embedding online videos into PowerPoint presentations can enhance your message, making your content more engaging and dynamic. We’ll explain how to use the Insert tab to add online videos and share troubleshooting tips for common playback issues.

Using the Insert Tab for Online Videos

To embed a YouTube video, first, copy the URL of the video you want to include. Navigate to YouTube, find your video, and click on the Share button below the video player. Copy the provided URL.

Next, open your PowerPoint presentation and select the slide where you want to insert the video. Click on the Insert tab in the ribbon. Within this tab, find the Media group and select Online Video .

A dialog box will appear, prompting you to paste the video URL you copied. Paste the URL and click Insert . The video should now be embedded in your slide. This method allows the video to be played directly within your presentation, ensuring a seamless experience for your audience.

Troubleshooting Common Video Playback Issues

Sometimes, embedded videos might not play as expected. Here are a few common issues and solutions:

  • Black Box Instead of Video: This often occurs if there’s a poor internet connection . Make sure you’re connected to a reliable network.
  • Video Not Playing at All: Check to ensure the video URL is correct and the video’s privacy settings allow for embedding. Also, verify that your PowerPoint is up to date.
  • Playback Lag or Buffering: Ensure your connection is stable. Try preloading the video before your presentation starts.
  • No Sound: Double-check the volume settings on your device and within the video itself.

If issues persist, consider downloading the video and embedding it as a local file instead. This can prevent dependence on internet connectivity during your presentation.

By understanding these troubleshooting tips, you can ensure your embedded videos play smoothly, enhancing the overall effectiveness of your PowerPoint presentations.

Technical Aspects of Video Integration

Embedding a YouTube video in PowerPoint involves understanding the right video formats and compatibility aspects, along with adjusting playback settings for an optimal experience.

Understanding Video Formats and Compatibility

When it comes to embedding videos, compatibility is key. PowerPoint supports various video formats such as MP4, AVI, MOV, and WMV. Among these, MP4 is typically the most compatible due to its wide-ranging support across devices and software.

Using valid URLs from YouTube or an embed code lets our video play directly on the slide. However, we need to ensure our PowerPoint and system can support embedding and streaming online videos. Older PowerPoint versions might not support certain formats or streaming capabilities, so keeping software updated is vital.

Some basic steps include:

  • Extract the video URL from YouTube.
  • Navigate to the Insert tab in PowerPoint.
  • Select Online Video and paste the URL.
  • Resize and place the video on the slide as needed.

Adjusting Playback Settings for a Smooth Experience

Once the video is embedded, adjusting playback settings can significantly enhance our presentation. We can set videos to autoplay or start when clicked. Also, adjusting the start time and volume can cater to specific sections of the video or audience preferences.

For instance, tweaking the start time ensures the most relevant content displays immediately. We can also set the video to start full-screen, providing a more immersive experience.

Key settings to consider:

  • Autoplay: Automatically start the video when the slide appears.
  • Start Time: Specify when the video should begin.
  • Volume Controls: Adjust the default volume level.
  • Full-Screen Mode: Enable the video to play in full-screen for better visibility.

Managing these playback settings properly ensures that our video runs seamlessly during the presentation, adding value without distracting from the main content.

Related posts:

  • How to Do Hanging Indent on PowerPoint: Step-by-Step Formatting Guide
  • How to Crop a Picture into a Circle in PowerPoint: A Step-by-Step Guide
  • How to Copy a Slide from One PowerPoint to Another: A Step-by-Step Guide
  • How to Save PowerPoint as Video: Step-by-Step Guide for Beginners
  • How to Make a Picture a Circle in PowerPoint: Step-by-Step Guide
  • How to Print Notes in PowerPoint: A Step-by-Step Guide
  • How to Add Narration to PowerPoint: Step-by-Step Guide for Effective Presentations
  • How to Insert PDF into PowerPoint: A Step-by-Step Guide for Seamless Integration
  • How to Play PowerPoint Slides Automatically Without Clicking: Step-by-Step Guide
  • How to Embed Excel into PowerPoint: A Step-by-Step Guide
  • How to Add Hyperlink in PowerPoint: A Step-by-Step Guide
  • How to Do a Voice Over on PowerPoint: Easy Steps for Professionals

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  2. 4 Easy Ways to Cite Images in PowerPoint

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  1. Citing Sources in PowerPoint Presentations

    Citing Sources in PowerPoint Slides. Note: APA does not have specific rules about the format of PowerPoint slides. Rasmussen University does have recommended guidelines outlined below and in the attached PPT presentation. PowerPoint slides may need citations, depending on what type of information is included on the slide.

  2. How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA, MLA or Chicago

    To cite PowerPoint presentation slides, include the author name, year/date of presentation, the title, the source description, the website and/or university name, and the URL where the source can be found. Author Surname, X. Y. (Year, Month Day). Title of the presentation [PowerPoint slides]. Publisher.

  3. How to Cite a PowerPoint in APA Style

    Revised on December 27, 2023. To reference a PowerPoint presentation in APA Style, include the name of the author (whoever presented the PowerPoint), the date it was presented, the title (italicized), "PowerPoint slides" in square brackets, the name of the department and university, and the URL where the PowerPoint can be found.

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    Cite your source automatically in APA. Media File: APA PowerPoint Slide Presentation. This resource is enhanced by a PowerPoint file. If you have a Microsoft Account, you can view this file with PowerPoint Online. Select the APA PowerPoint Presentation link above to download slides that provide a detailed review of the APA citation style.

  5. 3 Ways to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation

    Download Article. 1. Start your Works Cited entry with the name of the presenter. Type the last name of the presenter, followed by a comma, then add their first name. Place a period at the end of their first name. [1] Example: Kalyanaraman, Ananth. 2. Add the title of the presentation in quotation marks.

  6. APA Citation Guide (7th edition) : Powerpoint Presentations

    Websites you create: For images, include a citation under each image using this format "From: XXXX" and then make the image a link back to the original image ( example - picture of little girl). Or list the citation at the bottom of the web page. For quotes or material from other sources, include an in-text citation that links back to the ...

  7. How to Cite PowerPoint Presentations in APA & MLA Formats

    How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation Properly When you're writing an academic paper, you typically need to cite your sources at the end in a bibliography. You may also need to cite a source in the body of your paper. Let's take a closer look at how two of the most common style guides handle citing PowerPoint presentations. Note: If you're using

  8. PowerPoint slide or lecture note references

    This page contains reference examples for PowerPoint slides or lecture notes, including the following: Use these formats to cite information obtained directly from slides. If the slides contain citations to information published elsewhere, and you want to cite that information as well, then it is best to find, read, and cite the original source ...

  9. How to Cite a PowerPoint in MLA

    If you viewed the PowerPoint in person and it isn't available online, cite it using details of the context in which you viewed it: the name of the course, the date the lecture was given, and the name and location of your university. You can also add the optional label "PowerPoint presentation" for clarity. MLA format. Author last name ...

  10. How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation in APA 7?

    What you need to do first is to have a very detailed look at the terms and conditions of the original image. Some images require attribution while others don't. Once you insert the image, you need to then create a new text box, align it at the center and write the following: Figure 1. Image Description.

  11. APA for PowerPoint Presentations

    APA for PowerPoint Presentations. The APA manual does not have a section on how to format a PowerPoint presentation, but you can follow APA style guidelines within your PowerPoint. For example: Include the same information on your title slide that you would have on a title page. Include in-text citations for any quote, paraphrase, image, graph ...

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    Format for PowerPoint presentations; How to format your PowerPoint in APA style; AI: ChatGPT, etc. Format for PowerPoint presentations ... Title of the PowerPoint [PowerPoint slides]. Host site. URL. Example: Thomes, C. (n.d.). UMGC Library APA citation basics [PowerPoint slides]. University of Maryland Global Campus. https://libguides.umgc.edu ...

  17. How to Cite a Website, Book, YouTube Video, etc. in PowerPoint

    Adding footnote citations. You can also use footnotes on your PowerPoint slides to give citations. Next to the text you would like to reference, add the number '1' for your first citation.Highlight it, and then from the 'Home' option, open the Font box and select 'Subscript' and click on 'OK'. Then, click on 'Insert,' select a text box and then draw it onto your slide.

  18. How to Cite PowerPoint Presentations in APA Format

    How to Cite PowerPoint Presentations. 1. Cite in References. Include it in the References list like any other online file (e.g. PDF) but mention the file format in brackets and the "Retrieved from" URL pointer. The APA Style recommends this format for published presentations available on the web:

  19. Citing Business Sources in APA Style

    7.1: In-text citations in Presentations. You can cite references within the text of your presentation slide using the same APA format for in-text citations (Author, Date) as in a written essay. Remember to cite sources for direct quotations, paraphrased materials, and sources of facts (such as market share data in the example slide).

  20. Citing in Powerpoint Presentations

    The PowerPoint presentation must have a slide that is the References page . Normally this would be the last slide. References on the slide are formatted exactly as they would be formatted for the References page of a paper. Below is a Sample PowerPoint in which APA format is used. Remember that the placement of the parenthetical citation on a ...

  21. How to Cite a PowerPoint Presentation

    PowerPoint presentation. APA style suggests that you use in-text citations with no footnotes/endnotes. Whenever you are using some abstract from the presentation in your paper, mention this in the brackets right in the text. Include the last name of the presenter and the year of the presentation. E.g. (Baker, 2010).

  22. How to Cite Images

    Currently, citing images in PPT is a bit of the Wild West. If details aren't provided by an instructor, there are a number of ways to cite. What's most important is that if the image is not a free stock image, you give credit to the author for the work. Here are some options: 1. Some sites, such as Creative Commons and Wikimedia, include the ...

  23. How to Embed a YouTube Video in PowerPoint: Step-by-Step Guide

    Next, open your PowerPoint presentation and select the slide where you want to insert the video. Click on the Insert tab in the ribbon. Within this tab, find the Media group and select Online Video .