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The 4 Seasons Activities: Easy Must-have lesson plans

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Teaching kids about the seasons can be a fun and engaging experience. Whether you’re teaching your own children or a classroom of students, there are some must-have lessons that will help kids understand how the weather changes throughout the year. With these 4 seasons activities, you can introduce your students to the four main seasons: winter, spring, summer, and fall. 

Introduce Vocabulary

4 seasons activities vocabulary cards picture

Start by introducing vocabulary related to each season. Use pictures or flashcards to help kids learn words like “winter” and “summer,” as well as other seasonal words like “snowman” and “sunscreen.” This will give them a better understanding of which season comes when. 

Snag a free roadmap to help you stay on track throughout the year when you are lesson planning.  HERE!

social studies lesson on seasons

To help you plan out your year, grab a  free yearly overview for science , which makes planning stress-free.

Practice Tracking Weather Changes

4 seasons activities

An excellent way for children to learn about the seasons is by tracking weather changes over time using temperature charts and graphs. For example, have them fill out a chart each day with what type of clothing they wore that day (e.g., shorts in summer vs. sweaters in winter). They can also track other factors like precipitation levels and wind speed throughout different seasons. 

You can also use real-time web resources like NOAA’s National Weather Service or The Weather Channel to track current weather patterns around the world. 

Length of Day and Night: 4 Seasons Activities 

The main factor in determining what season it is at any given time is the length of daylight versus nighttime. By showing students diagrams or pictures, explain how daylight hours are longer than night hours during summer, while in winter, night hours are longer than day hours. This will help them understand why we experience different temperatures in different seasons due to the amount of sunlight exposure during each season. 

Explore Nature

Another fun 4 seasons activities is to take your students on field trips outdoors to explore nature during each season! In winter, they can look for animal tracks in the snow or make snow angels; in springtime, they can observe how flowers bloom; in summer, they can search for bugs; and in fall, they can go leaf-peeping! These outdoor activities will give them first-hand knowledge about how weather changes from season to season and inspire appreciation for nature all year round!

Incorporate Art Projects

blue branded notebook picture

Art projects are an excellent way for children to get creative while learning about how weather changes throughout the year. Have them create a painting featuring animals that hibernate in winter or draw pictures of plants blooming in springtime! You could even assign group art projects where they make a mural representing all four seasons side-by-side. 

4 Seasons Activities for kids

As teachers, it’s important that we teach our students not just what each season is but also why it happens—how changing temperatures lead to different types of weather patterns and various forms of wildlife activity across all four seasons of the year! These must-have lessons and 4 seasons activities should help you introduce young learners to concepts related to seasonal weather changes so that they leave your class feeling more informed than ever before!

Add in pre-made 4 seasons activities

weather activities for kids picture

Teaching the seasons does not have to take long. With state testing, it is hard to fit it all in. If you are struggling with coming up with lesson plans on your own, I’ve got you covered. My Weather Curriculum Pack  is perfect for 2nd and 3rd graders. It is full of lesson plans, anchor charts, low-prep science experiments, worksheets, and quizzes.

Each unit comes with:

  • lesson plans
  • vocabulary words
  • anchor chart ideas
  • an interactive notebook activity or corresponding worksheet
  • nonfiction reading passages
  • additional worksheets perfect for a science station
  • an end of the unit quiz to assess their understanding of the topic

Figuring out how to fit science into your day is easy when all the work is done for you!

Grab MORE teaching ideas here!

7 EASY TOPICS FOR 2ND GRADE LIFE SCIENCE CURRICULUM

SECOND GRADE SCIENCE BASIC PRINCIPLES: 6 EASY TEACHING TOPICS

7 WAYS TO MAKE WORKSHEETS ENGAGING FOR KIDS

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Seasons Curriculum

The seasons of the earth topic is so much fun to learn. our learners can be little astronomers, forecasters, travelers, farmers, and fashion icons, search for worksheets.

social studies lesson on seasons

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Table of Contents

Characterized by distinct climate conditions, the Northern and Southern Hemispheres experience four seasons – spring , summer , autumn/fall , and winter . This cycle regularly repeats every year, and seasons have a great deal of influence on vegetation and animals. While the four seasons occur in mid-latitude regions, places near the equator only have two seasons – wet and dry.

In ancient cultures, seasons were associated with light and darkness, thus bringing us festivals to celebrate.

See the fact file below for more information on Seasons Curriculum or alternatively, you can download our 16-page Seasons Curriculum worksheet pack to utilize within the classroom or home environment.

Key Facts & Information

  • Short video explainer
  • Before we start, watch a short and simple video explainer about seasons found on the PDF download.

How to deliver

  • The seasons of the Earth topic is so much fun to learn. Our learners can be little astronomers, forecasters, travelers, farmers, and fashion icons. How can this be? Learning about seasons answers how the Earth’s axial tilt caused the different climate conditions at other times of the year and in parts of the globe. Moreover, seasons also affect weather patterns. We also plan our calendar of activities and clothes to wear based on the seasons. 
  • First, let’s find out how we can be novice astronomers! In contrast to popular belief, seasons are not due to the Earth’s proximity to the Sun, and some believe that winter happens when the Earth is farthest to the Sun, during summer when closest. 
  • Earth spins once on its axis every 23 hours and 56 minutes (that’s a day)
  • Earth is tilted at an angle of about 23.5 degrees
  • Because of the tilt, the Northern and Southern Hemispheres had an opposite temperature
  • Earth follows an elliptical orbit around the sun
  • We can support the discussion with a definition of technical terms. Providing a vocabulary activity ahead of time helps the teachers and learners establish common grounds. Ask them to look for the terms such as solstice, equinox, perihelion, and aphelion. 
  • It is also a great venue to develop our learners’ analytic skills. Again, using a visual representation, we can ask the questions, “If the North Pole is pointed towards the sun, what is the season in the Southern Hemisphere?” Or “ How significant is the impact of the Earth’s axial tilt on countries near the Tropic of Cancer?”  
  • The Northern Hemisphere experiences summer when the North Pole points towards the sun, as seen in the illustration. Meanwhile, it is winter in the Southern Hemisphere . After six months, when the South Pole points towards the sun, the season is in reverse. 
  • Moreover, countries near the equator have only two seasons: monsoon or wet and dry seasons. 
  • It is crucial to inform our students about the difference between seasons and the weather. While a season is caused by our planet’s revolution around the sun, the weather is caused by the changes in atmospheric pressure, the earth’s rotation, and a region’s topography. To compare the two, we can present a table. 
  • They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Our learners may infer the differences between the four seasons through pictures. 
  • For this part, our learners can describe what they notice in the pictures. How are they different? Moreover, we can also ask about their activities during these seasons or which is their favorite season of the year. 
  • We can devise a calendar of activities based on the seasons. For example, in the USA (2022), spring starts on March 20, summer on June 21, fall or autumn on September 23, and winter on December 21. What are your plans this year?
  • Using this learning material, we do not only assess their knowledge about the seasons, but also their personal experiences and how these help with their learning. 
  • However, climatic zones may vary for large countries like the US, affecting plants and animals. In deepening the discussion, you may present a map.  
  • In addition to this, we can engage our learners in practical lessons by encouraging them to grow their gardens. For example, the freezing temperature in Zone 3 limited their planting season, and they can only plant beans between June and August. Meanwhile, those in Zone 8, with a hot climatic zone, can plant beans from March to October. Almost all year round!
  • Like the impact of the changing seasons on plants, animals are also affected by this phenomenon. Sometimes animal adaptations such as camouflage are triggered by the weather and the season. During spring and summer, the food supply is abundant. By autumn or fall, many animals prepare and gather food for the coming of winter. In addition to collecting food, some hibernate or migrate. For example, bears are awake in spring, eat a lot in summer and fall, and hibernate in winter. Remember our vocabulary activity? You can also use it to discuss adaptation, hibernation, camouflage, and migration. Another example is geese which lay eggs in springs, eat in summer, migrate in fall, and secure a warm place during winter. 
  • Our learners can be little zoologists while studying seasons. You may group them and provide charts with animal adaptations for every season.  They can also make a collage of pictures more visual and entertaining. 
  • Aside from being botanists and zoologists, we can also be fashion icons. So open the cabinets and dress for the season! Seasons do not only dictate our trips in a year, but it also affects what we wear. Do you ever wonder why your mom always gifted you warm sweatshirts for Christmas or cool t-shirts during spring break? Aside from tons of season sales, we wear what is comfortable. During springtime, we wear breathable fabrics like cotton and linen. The hottest season, summer, is also the time to put loose-fitting clothes with lighter colors ready to hit the beaches. Aside from falling leaves, autumn or fall is the transition season between summer and winter. A perfect time to have soft and thicker fabrics, usually with an added layer of a coat or sweater. With winter’s long nights and cold temperatures, jackets, sweaters, scarves, gloves, and coats are usually worn.
  • You may facilitate a game like Dress Me to make it more fun! Young learners can mix and match clothes for a mannequin depending on the symbols (flip flops, sprouts, pumpkins, or snowflakes) you presented. This activity is also applicable with tiny paper dolls and sketch pads. 
  • Seasons are not only changing in temperature or weather patterns. It is a significant astrological sign in many ancient cultures. Many cultures celebrate the coming of spring for varied reasons and ways. In Thailand, Songkran Festival takes place after the spring equinox. This water splashing festival marks the start of the Buddhist New Year for the Thai people. One of the most colorful festivals in the world is Holi. For the Hindus, powdered colors signify the many hues of spring. Spring symbolizes new beginnings, life, and rebirth in many cultures, such as the Anglo-Saxons and Christians. That’s the very same reason we celebrate Easter. 
  • Similar to spring, winter had a great holiday vibe. Aside from Christmas, winter festivals are most awaited. One of Europe’s largest winter festivals is Up Helly Aa, or the Shetland Viking Festival, and it features Scandinavian-descended Scots’ Yule tradition of lighting torches. Other winter celebrations include the Sapporo Snow Festival and Reykjavik Winter Lights Festivals. 
  • For the Hindus , Jains , and Sikhs , Diwali, or the Festival of Lights, marks the triumph of light over darkness. One of the biggest holidays in India, Diwali , usually falls every fall or autumn (October or November). Like India, many agricultural societies celebrate the harvest season. In Indonesia, offering to Dewi Sri, a fertility goddess, is expected during the Rice Harvest Festival. The Mid-Autumn Festival or the Moon Festival in China, Taiwan, and Vietnam is the time of the year to give thanks for the bountiful harvest. Jewish culture celebrates harvest through Sukkot every 15th day of Tishri. Of course, Thanksgiving celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November, is one of the most popular and busiest holidays in the Northern Hemisphere, particularly in the US and Canada. 
  • It is also important not to forget about the seasons for regions at the Tropic of Cancer. Deepen the learners’ knowledge of geography by analyzing the difference between having four seasons versus two seasons. Countries in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres experience four seasons, while places near the equator have two seasons: a wet and a dry season. 
  • For countries with only two seasons, such as Indonesia, Thailand, Maldives, Costa Rica, Peru, Mexico,  Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Cambodia, Taiwan, Philippines, India, Northern Australia, and Brazil, and many parts of Africa, each season lasts for 5 to 6 months. 
  • Learning outcomes
  • The changing seasons are caused by the Earth’s axial tilt and rotation and its relation to the sun. Today, we can define this as a scientific phenomenon. During the time of our ancestors, the changing of seasons had been widely observed and recorded by various complex societies. Ancient observations mainly were associated with spirits and, later on, deities. Nevertheless, they have adopted a planting, harvesting, hunting, and gathering cycle. Their early knowledge served as the foundations of our techniques today. They also get ready for frigid winter by storing food and wearing thick clothing.
  • Our ancestors’ spiritual explanations of the seasons brought us festivals to celebrate and feasts to share. 
  • Changing seasons also have a significant impact on plants and animals. Like how we can understand season-based cultural traditions, learning about seasons also made us more aware of animal cycles. 
  • Knowing about the seasons can make us more of a planner, and we can better plan our activities for every season of the year.

Seasons Curriculum Worksheets

This is a fantastic bundle that includes everything you need to know about Seasons Curriculum across 16 in-depth pages. These are ready-to-use worksheets that are perfect for teaching students about Seasons which cycle regularly repeats every year, having a great deal of influence on vegetation and animals.

Autumn Worksheets

Complete List Of Included Worksheets

  • What to consider
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  • Lesson Plan Template
  • Suggested Worksheets

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The Productive Teacher

How to Teach Earth’s Seasons in Middle School Science

March 29, 2021 Leave a Comment

social studies lesson on seasons

Teaching about Earth’s seasons is a great way to integrate your science and social studies lessons. You can teach about the Earth’s seasons during your space unit. You can connect this lesson to the study of ancient cultures who built temples to align to the Sun during the equinoxes and solstices.

What Causes the Earth’s Seasons?

The tilt of the Earth causes the Earth’s seasons. The Earth does not sit upright as it rotates around the Sun. It is tilted at 23.5 degrees. As a result, sunlight does not hit the Earth evenly. When the northern hemisphere is titled toward the Sun, sunlight hits it more directly, and it is warmer. This happens during summer. When the northern hemisphere is titled away from the Sun, sunlight hits it less directly, and it is colder. This happens during winter. Seasons are opposite in the northern and southern hemispheres because when one hemisphere is tilted toward the Sun, the other hemisphere is titled away from the Sun.

Common Misconceptions about Earth’s Seasons

There are a few common misconceptions when it comes to understanding the relationship between the Earth’s relationship to the Sun and the Earth’s seasons. First, some of your students may think that the Earth’s seasons are caused by the distance between the Earth and the Sun. They believe that it is summer when the Earth is close to the Sun and winter when the Earth is farther away from the Sun. This misconception is incorrect because the distance between the Earth and the Sun is too great for the slight variation in Earth’s orbit to affect the seasons. The Earth is slightly closer to the Sun during one part of the year, but this occurs during winter in the Northern Hemisphere and summer in the Southern Hemisphere.

Another misconception about the Earth’s seasons is that the Earth tilts back and forth to cause them. The Earth’s tilt does not wobble. It is always tilted in the same direction. As the Earth moves around the Sun, the tilt faces the Sun for about a quarter of the rotation and faces away from the Sun for another quarter of a rotation. This creates winter and summer. When the tilt is parallel to the Sun, we have fall and spring.

A surprising misconception about Earth’s seasons is that the seasons are the same everywhere on Earth. Some students may not know that we have opposite seasons in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. You will want to address this misconception right away because it will make it difficult for students to understand what causes the seasons if they don’t understand the difference between the hemispheres.

Earth's seasons

Integrating Social Studies

People have been paying attention to the seasons for thousands of years. Around ten thousand years ago, people started farming and the seasons became even more important. They needed to know when to plant their crops to ensure the best yields. As a result, Earth’s seasons were an important part of religion.

Early humans built temples, like Stonehenge, to celebrate the summer and winter solstices. The Temple of Kukulcan in Mexico was designed so that it looks like a shadow serpent slithers down the steps on the spring and fall equinoxes. The slithering shadow represented the god Kukuclan’s trip down to the underworld.

I love showing students the connection between the science of the natural world and how humans have responded to it! Teaching students about the Earth’s seasons is a great way to show your students how the Earth’s tilt and orbit have been important to people for thousands of years.

Are you excited about teaching your students about Earth’s seasons, but you don’t know where to start? I got you! I have an entire information text set that teaches students about the science and the history of Earth’s seasons. Each information text and comprehension questions to help students consolidate what they learn from reading. You can use all of the information texts or choose the ones you like best. This is also a great opportunity for a jigsaw activity or group presentations, so students can learn from one information text and teach the rest of the class what they learned.

Earth's seasons

Here are all the information texts included:

Earth’s Tilt

The Tilt of Other Planets

Earth’s Orbit

The Summer Solstice

Earth’s Seasons

The Winter Solstice

The Fall Equinox

The Spring Equinox

Karnak Temple Complex

The Temple of Kukulclan

Are You Teaching Another Science Topic?

I am working on creating more science units so that every science teacher can get exactly what he or she needs for her students. You can also read about how I use brain science to teach other science topics on my blog. Click the pictures below to learn more.

social studies lesson on seasons

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Agricultural Literacy Curriculum Matrix

Lesson plan, grade levels, type of companion resource, content area standards, agricultural literacy outcomes, common core, four seasons on a farm, grade level.

Students identify the characteristics of the four seasons of the year, investigate what causes seasons, and observe the effects changing seasons have on farms.  Grades K-2

Estimated Time

Materials needed.

  • Season Card
  • Magnets, tape, or reusable mounting putty (teacher tack)

Activity 1: Reasons for the Seasons

  • Birthday Signs , 1 per student
  • Season Signs
  • Reasons for the Seasons PowerPoint
  • The Reasons for the Seasons  by Gail Gibbons

Activity 2: Season Acrostic Poems

  • Seasonal Acrostic Poems
  • Winter: An Alphabet Acrostic by Steven Schnur
  • Spring: An Alphabet Acrostic by Steven Schnur
  • Summer: An Alphabet Acrostic by Steven Schnur
  • Autumn: An Alphabet Acrostic by Steven Schnur
  • Seasons Graphic Organizer

Activity 3: Four Seasons on the Farm

  • Farming by Gail Gibbons
  • Four Seasons on a Farm Wheel
  • Brass fasteners (brads)
  • Crayons, colored pencils, or markers

axis: a real or imaginary line on which something rotates

equator: an imaginary line drawn around Earth equally distant from both poles, dividing the Earth into northern and southern hemispheres

equinox: either of the two times each year (about March 21 and September 21) when the sun crosses the equator and day and night are of approximately equal length everywhere on earth

North Pole: the point in the Northern Hemisphere where the Earth's axis of rotation meets its surface

Northern Hemisphere: the half of the Earth that is north of the Equator

season: one of the four natural divisions of the year—spring, summer, autumn, and winter—in the North and South Temperate Zones

solstice: one of the two times during the year (about June 21 and December 21) when the sun is farthest north or south of the equator, resulting in the longest and shortest days of the year

South Pole: the point in the Southern Hemisphere where the Earth's axis of rotation meets its surface

Southern Hemisphere: the half of the Earth that is south of the Equator

Background Agricultural Connections

Earth's axis is an imaginary pole that goes through the center of the Earth from the North Pole to the South Pole . The Earth is tilted and spins around this axis, one complete turn each day, as it travels around the sun. Throughout the year, the sun's most direct rays hit different areas on Earth. Earth's tilted axis is the reason we have seasons .

The equator is an imaginary line that divides the Earth into a Northern and Southern Hemisphere . When the North Pole tilts toward the Sun, it's summer for the Northern Hemisphere. When the South Pole tilts toward the Sun, it's winter in the Northern Hemisphere. For people living in the tropical zone near the equator, there is not much change in the temperature between the seasons. For people living in the temperate zones in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, there are four seasons, each with its own characteristics.

The first day of winter, on or around December 21st, is the shortest day of the year and is called the winter solstice . Solstices occur when the sun shines farthest away from the equator. The spring equinox , the first day of spring, is on or around March 21st. An equinox occurs when the sun's rays shine directly on the equator. On an equinox, the length of the day and night are approximately equal. The first day of summer, on or around June 21st, is the longest day of the year and is called the summer solstice. The autumnal equinox, the first day of autumn, begins on or around September 21st.

Seasonal changes affect farm activities. In winter, it is cold, the days are short, and many farms are covered in snow. During this season, plans for next year's crops are made, farm equipment and machinery is maintained and repaired, and animals are fed, cared for, and kept warm.

Spring is a busy season full of new life on the farm. The days become longer, trees bloom, and seeds begin to sprout. There are new farm animal babies to care for. Fields are tilled, planted, and fertilized.

In summer, it is hot and the days are long. The crops and baby animals grow bigger. Weeds must be controlled and crops need water. Hay is cut and baled and silage is chopped and stored. Many fairs and livestock competitions occur in the summer.

Autumn is harvest season. The days become shorter and the leaves turn red, yellow, orange, and brown before they fall from the trees. The baby animals are big now, and some animals are sold to market.

  • Draw four columns on a whiteboard, and write one of the four seasons at the top of each column. 
  • Give each student a Season Card  and ask, "What is you favorite season?" Have them complete the sentence on their card, "My favorite season is ________________ because ______________________."
  • Ask each student to read their sentence to the class and then place it in the correct column on the board with a magnet, tape, or reusable mounting putty (teacher tack) to create a bar graph.
  • Discuss the results of the bar graph. Which season do most students in the class like best?
  •  Explain to the class that they will be exploring seasons and how the changing seasons affect farms.

Explore and Explain

  • Give each student a Birthday Sign , and ask them to write their birthday on it (month and day).
  • Place a Season Sign in each corner of the room. Have the students stand by the sign that shows the season they think their birthday is in.
  • Ask the class, "What causes the seasons?"

social studies lesson on seasons

  • Point out the equator on one of the Earth images. Explain to the students that the equator is an imaginary line that divides the Earth into a Northern and Southern Hemisphere. When the North Pole tilts toward the Sun, it's summer for the Northern Hemisphere. When the South Pole tilts toward the Sun, it's winter in the Northern Hemisphere. For a person living in the tropical zone near the equator, there is not much change in temperature between the seasons. For people living in the temperate zones in the northern and southern hemispheres, there are four seasons, each with its own characteristics.
  • Show Slide 3. Explain that the first day of winter, on or around December 21st, is the shortest day of the year and is called the winter solstice. Solstices occur when the sun shines farthest away from the equator.
  • Ask the students standing by the Winter Sign to check and make sure their birthday is actually in the winter (December 21- March 20). If not, they should move to a different season.
  • Show Slide 4. Explain that the first day of spring, on or around March 21st, is called the spring equinox. An equinox occurs when the sun's rays shine directly on the equator. On an equinox, the length of the day and night are approximately equal.
  • Ask the students standing by the Spring Sign to check and make sure their birthday is actually in the spring (March 21- June 20). If not, they should move to a different season.
  • Show Slide 5. Explain that the first day of summer, on or around June 21st, is the longest day of the year and is called the summer solstice.
  • Ask the students standing by the Summer Sign to check and make sure their birthday is actually in the summer (June 21-September 20). If not, they should move to a different season.
  • Show Slide 6. Explain that the first day of autumn, on or around September 21st, is called the autumnal equinox.
  • Ask the students standing by the Autumn Sign to check and make sure their birthday is actually in the autumn (September 21- December 20). If not, they should move to a different season.
  • Read  The Reasons for the Seasons  by Gail Gibbons for additional facts about the science behind the changing seasons.
  • Read one of the poems from  Seasonal Acrostic Poems .
  • Explain that an acrostic poem is a poem where letters on each line (often, but not always, the first letters of each line) spell out a word or phrase. Highlight the letters from the lines of the example poem that spell out a word. Point out that the poem describes or tells about the word. An acrostic poem does not need to rhyme and can be as long or as short as the poet wants it to be.
  • Weather:  Identify the characteristics of the season and describe the weather during the season.
  • Clothing:  Describe the clothing people wear during the season.
  • Plants/Animals:  Explain what happens to plants and animals during the season.
  • Celebrations:  Identify the holidays that occur during the season and foods that are often associated with those holidays.
  • Using the graphic organizer as a prewriting tool, have the students write an acrostic poem that describes their birthday season. Publish their poems in a class book and/or do a poetry reading to allow students an opportunity to share their poems.
  • Dairy farms 
  • Egg and poultry farms 
  • Grain farms
  • Fruit and vegetable farms
  • Livestock farms and ranches
  • Allow time for the groups to discuss what types of activities they think need to take place on their farm during each season. 
  • Read Farming by Gail Gibbons. Tell the students to listen for activities that take place on their farm during each season.

social studies lesson on seasons

  • Have the students draw pictures of activities that take place on their farm during each season in the appropriate sections of the printout of the four seasons.
  • Students should then cut out each of the three printouts on the dashed circles and lines. 
  • Using a thumb tack, have the students or an adult helper make a hole in the marked center of each cutout and use a brass fastener (brad) to attach them with the title on top, the drawings in the middle, and the season dates on the bottom.
  • Reorganize the class into groups of four students, so that one student represents each season in the group. Have the students share their season wheel with their new group.

After conducting these activities, review and summarize the following key concepts:

  • There are four seasons—winter, spring, summer, and fall—and each has its own characteristics.
  • Seasons are a result of Earth's tilt on its axis as it spins and travels around the sun.
  • Seasonal changes affect farm activities.

Recommended Companion Resources

  • A Home Run for Peanuts
  • A Year on the Farm: with Casey & Friends
  • An Apple Tree Through the Year
  • An Orange in January
  • And the Good Brown Earth
  • Apples for Everyone
  • Cranberry Bounce
  • Four Seasons of Corn: A Winnebago Tradition
  • Grandpa's Garden
  • Growing Seasons
  • Harvest Year
  • How Do Apples Grow?
  • How Things Grow
  • I Can Read About Seasons
  • In The Three Sisters Garden
  • It Feels Like Snow
  • Lily's Garden
  • Our Apple Tree
  • Ox-Cart Man
  • Pie in the Sky
  • Sleep Tight Farm
  • Snow Comes to the Farm
  • Spring is for Strawberries
  • The Apple Pie Tree
  • The Real Reason Leaves Change Color in the Fall
  • The Year at Maple Hill Farm
  • This Year's Garden
  • This is the Sunflower
  • Thunder Cake
  • Thunderstorm
  • Trax the Tractor and His Farming Friends
  • Weather Wisdoms
  • Weather Words and What They Mean
  • Winter on the Farm

Lynn Wallin

Organization

National Center for Agricultural Literacy

Agriculture and the Environment

  • Provide examples of how weather patterns affect plant and animal growth for food (T1.K-2.d)
  • Describe how farmers use land to grow crops and support livestock (T1.K-2.a)

Plants and Animals for Food, Fiber & Energy

  • Explain how farmers work with the lifecycle of plants and animals (planting/breeding) to harvest a crop (T2.K-2.a)

Education Content Standards

Science (science).

K-ESS2: Earth's Systems

  • K-ESS2-1    Use and share observations of local weather conditions to describe patterns over time.

K-PS3: Energy

  • K-PS3-1    Make observations to determine the effect of sunlight on Earth’s surface.

1-ESS1: Earth's Place in the Universe

  • 1-ESS1-2    Make observations at different times of the year to relate the amount of daylight to the time of year.

Common Core Connections

Anchor standards: reading.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

Anchor Standards: Speaking and Listening

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Anchor Standards: Writing

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

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Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Free science lesson - “seasons for social studies”.

social studies lesson on seasons

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Lesson Overview

The students will be learning about the four seasons. They will be learning about the months each season occurs, weather, clothing, and activities that can be done during each season. 

Essential Question

What is a season? What makes each season unique? 

  • Assessments

Subject(s):

Recommended Technology:

Other Instructional Materials or Notes:

Kindergarten

  • Weather & Climate

-Smart Board  -Computer 

-PowePoint on the seasons  -Four seasons worksheet with matching items  -Glue sticks  -Guess the Seasons Video:  https://scetv.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/sesame-guess-the-seasons/gue...

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  • K.E.3A.2 Develop and use models to predict seasonal weather patterns and changes.

Lesson Partners: PBS LearningMedia

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Activities for Exploring the Four Seasons

seasons activities

The changing from winter to spring to summer to fall is a great way to begin to talk with preschoolers about the passage of time . Even if your area does not have visible changes for each season, your preschoolers can begin to know what happens at different times of the year. (Warmer in the summer; Christmas is in winter; you can buy pumpkins in the fall; and so forth.) These activities can lead preschoolers to explore the whole year, think about different seasonal changes, and discuss what happens in other locales during the seasons.

four seasons activities for pre-K

Seasons Activities for Preschool

Books About Seasons (Pre-K Pages)

Geoboards Season Task Cards (Pre-K Pages)

Season Pattern Blocks (Pre-K Pages)

Books About Trees (Pre-K Pages)

What’s the Weather? Dramatic Play Dress Up Center (Pre-K Pages)

Earth Science Books for Kids (Pre-K Pages)

Life Science Books for Kids (Pre-K Pages)

Weather Movement Game (Pre-K Pages)

Weather Process Art Activities (Pre-K Pages)

Nature Investigation Table (Pre-K Pages)

Seasonal Trees Nature Craft (Little Pinch of Perfect)

Printable Tree Book (Little Pinch of Perfect)

seasons activities for preschool

Activities Related to the Four Seasons

Sorting Seasons with Rocks and Stones (Buggy and Buddy)

Four Seasons Tree Cups for Light Play (Play Trains)

Four Seasons Agamograph (Easy Peasy and Fun)

Seasons of an Apple Tree Book Activity (Kids Activities)

Season Sensory Bottles (Mama, Papa, Bubba)

Moving with “Four Seasons” (Not Just Cute)

Weather and Season Cards (Prekinders)

Four Seasons Sorting Activity (Totschooling)

Alphabet Activities for the Seasons (No Time for Flash Cards)

Seasonal Tree Activity Box (Teach Preschool)

Four Seasons at the Sticky Table (Teach Preschool)

Season Playdough Mats (Natural Beach Living)

Clothing Sort Printable (From ABCs to ACTs)

Fall Activities Winter Activities Spring Activities Summer Activities

Preschool Linear Calendar

How far can love travel?

MONROE — Lauren Alexander crossed Valentine’s Day with social studies and came up with a fun project.

In January, the Manor Elementary School kindergarten teacher asked on social media for Valentine’s Day cards and postcards from all 50 states. Her students are learning to find Michigan on the U.S. map.

“The unit we have been studying in social studies is ‘Where are we located on the map?'" Alexander said. “I also wanted to show my (students) just how far love can travel."

Thanks to the cards, her 17 students can now identify Michigan on the map.

“I’m happy to say that my students know where Michigan is located on the map since we received the most cards from Michigan,” she said. “We also have learned that states can be big or little.”

While the class didn’t quite reach the goal of a card from every state, the students and Alexander are pleased with the outcome and even got a few surprises.

Valentine cards and a handful of postcards came from 33 states, including South Carolina, New Mexico and Montana. Three came from other countries.

“So far, we have received 82 cards. I’m sure a few more will trickle in over the week,” Alexander said. “We received cards from Canada, Australia, and even one from Japan is on the way. We were hoping to get a handful of cards, but I am truly shocked and so thankful for how many people took the time to send us a card.”

Some of the cards came with gifts.

“We got a package from my own kindergarten teacher (from 2004) with a very sweet letter and Vikings pencils for each of my students. I was born in Minnesota and didn’t move to Michigan until second grade,” Alexander said. “We also received a package from Canada with different Canada pins for my students and a package from Florida with seashells in it for all of us.”

Each valentine was recorded on the love map.

“My students have absolutely loved receiving these cards and valentines. They get so excited each day when we get to open our mail and put a heart on the map to see where it came from," she said. "My aunt and uncle were on a trip in Australia, so they were able to send us a few cards from there. It was very exciting to get to put a heart on the map from a country that far away."

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Alexander is a second-year teacher at Manor. She’s planning to repeat the Valentine’s Day/social studies project next year.

“It has been a huge hit,” she said. “I would love to continue to do this project in the years to come. It aligns with our curriculum, and it helps the students to see just how far love can travel.”

Cards can still be sent to Manor Elementary School, Lauren Alexander's class, 1731 W. Lorain St., Monroe, MI 48162.

— Contact reporter Suzanne Nolan Wisler at [email protected] .

Free Printable seasons worksheets

Discover the wonders of seasons with our free printable Social Studies seasons worksheets, designed to help students explore and understand the fascinating changes in nature throughout the year.

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Explore printable seasons worksheets

Seasons worksheets are an essential tool for teachers to effectively teach students about the various changes that occur throughout the year. These worksheets can be easily incorporated into Social studies and Geography lessons, providing a comprehensive understanding of the Earth's climate and how it impacts different regions. Teachers can use these resources to create engaging activities that help students grasp the concept of seasons and their effects on the environment, agriculture, and human life. By incorporating seasons worksheets into their lesson plans, educators can ensure that their students gain a solid foundation in this important aspect of Social studies and Geography, ultimately leading to a more well-rounded education.

Quizizz offers a wide range of educational resources, including seasons worksheets, that cater to the diverse needs of teachers and their students. With Quizizz, educators can access a vast library of worksheets and other offerings that cover various topics in Social studies and Geography, making it easier than ever to create engaging and interactive lessons. In addition to seasons worksheets, Quizizz also provides quizzes, games, and other interactive tools that can be used to supplement traditional teaching methods and enhance the learning experience for students. By utilizing Quizizz's extensive collection of resources, teachers can ensure that their students receive a comprehensive education in Social studies and Geography, while also keeping them engaged and motivated throughout the learning process.

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Lent: A Season to Dread or to Cherish?

social studies lesson on seasons

The Bible doesn’t command Christians to follow an annual cycle of religious observances. And as best we can tell from the historical record, in the decades immediately following Jesus’s ascension into heaven , they didn’t. Yet, within a few centuries those early Christians were observing an organized rotation of festivals and seasons. And ever since, that churchly calendar has shaped the religious practices of untold millions of believers.

Why is this the case—why do so many Christians, for example, celebrate Lent?

How did the Christian calendar come to be?

For those first Christians, who clung tenaciously to the angels’ word that the Lord would return in like manner (Acts 1:11), the focus was not on any annual celebrations. Rather, it was on the weekly observance of the Lord’s Day—Sunday. This was the first day of the week, the day on which God had created the heavens and the earth (Gen 1:1–5). It was also the day of God’s new creation, the day on which Jesus rose from the dead. It’s not a coincidence that all four Gospel writers make note of that fact (Matt 28:1; Mark 16:2; Luke 24:1; John 20:1). Everything revolved around this weekly observance as those Christians heeded Jesus’s promise that he would be with them always (Matt 28:20). And what better way could they be certain that he was keeping that promise than by gathering together as the body of Christ each Lord’s Day? That’s where they heard his life-giving Word and received Jesus himself as he came to them in the breaking of bread (Luke 24:35; Acts 2:42; 20:7).

But as the years turned into decades, and the decades began to add up, it was probably inevitable that the church would adopt a longer view. Building on the Old Testament practice of annual celebrations—think Passover and Day of Atonement—the church turned to an annual observance of the significant events in the life of Christ as a way teaching the faith. Dedicating time each year to focus on such events as Jesus’s baptism, temptation in the wilderness, transfiguration, or ascension can help believers remember to bring them up and consider their significance.

This move toward a series of annual celebrations evolved slowly. While it may have started earlier, we have clear indications that by the end of the second century some churches were observing an annual celebration of Jesus’s death and resurrection. A regular observance of his birth developed much more slowly, not really becoming an established practice until the mid-fourth century.

When and how did Lent emerge as a distinct season?

As for Lent , the historical details are not only few but sometimes conflicting. For a long time, scholars believed that Lent developed in relation to Easter. If the resurrection of Jesus was the ultimate celebration of victory, then it made sense that the days preceding it should be treated with great solemnity. A hallmark of that solemnity was fasting, a sign of forsaking the pleasures of this world. Gradually, the theory goes, the number of days of fasting was extended—first to a week, then to three. Eventually Lent became a forty-day period of preparation before the great celebration of Easter.

In the last century, this theory has been challenged by church historians, or at least refined. There is evidence, for example, that long before the Western church, centered in Rome, had settled on a forty-day Lent, there already existed a forty-day observance in Egypt. Rather than being connected to Easter, however, this observance occurred in the days after the Eastern church’s celebration of the baptism of Jesus. You will remember how the Gospel writers report that following Jesus’ baptism the Spirit led him into the wilderness for 40 days of temptation (Matt 4:1–11; Mark 1:12–13; Luke 4:1–13). The baptism of Jesus was typically observed by the Eastern church on January 6. The subsequent forty days served as a time of intense instruction for the church’s “catechumens,” those hearers of the Word who were preparing to be baptized. As the theory goes, this period of baptismal preparation was eventually transferred a month or so later. In its new location it now served as a time of preparation for the baptism of catechumens at Easter.

Are you confused yet? As I indicated, the historical record is sparse and even conflicted, with different practices sprouting up at various times and places. What’s more, the catechetical emphasis that typically characterized the early observance of Lent would eventually change, as you will read below. At this point, however, we must explore the relationship of Lent to baptism in order to get a better picture of the earliest practice.

The connection to baptism

As the annual celebration of Jesus’s resurrection gained a foothold, a central feature of that observance was the baptism of new Christians. Baptism , after all, is a participation in the death and resurrection of Jesus (Rom 6:3–4). What better time could there be to baptize new Christians than on the same occasion when the whole church commemorates the Lord’s death and resurrection?

So how did Lent come to be associated with baptism and Easter? As Christianity spread among the Gentile population, a lengthy period of instruction came to precede baptism. There was much for these new believers to learn. Unlike Jewish converts to Christianity, Gentile converts started from scratch. They didn’t know the creation and Exodus accounts. And the stories of all the major figures of the Old Testament—Abraham, Moses, David, Elijah—were alien to them. Their time of instruction was lengthy, often up to three years as they attended the preaching of God’s Word each Sunday. Once a group of catechumens was considered ready for baptism, they were enrolled in a final period of intense instruction—forty days—that occurred during the weeks before Easter. The whole congregation became involved as they joined with these catechumens through their prayers and support. This intensive process reached its zenith in the fourth and fifth centuries. This was the very time when the church year reached its height of development.

Over time, this period of preparation would morph into something different. After several centuries of rapid expansion following the legalization of Christianity under emperor Constantine (AD 313), most everyone in the Western world was baptized. Since the need for a final, Lenten push toward baptism was no longer essential, a catechetically oriented season such as Lent began to lose its significance. That did not mean, however, that the season would be abandoned.

The relationship between Lent and contrition

Other forces were also at work in those early centuries of the church. In addition to newly minted Christians whose entrance into the church was ushered in by the forty-day Lenten preparation, there were others who were in need of re-admittance into the church. These were the penitents, those who through some grievous sin had been placed under church discipline. They were, in effect, banned from the congregation and not permitted to join fellow believers in any churchly activity. The church chose to use this same forty-day period for these penitents to prepare for their reconciliation. Once complete, they could again participate fully with the whole church.

For these penitents, their Lenten observance, while to some degree catechetical, was much more focused on cultivating a spirit of repentance. As the countdown for the forty-days of Lent was ironed out, the first day eventually landed on a Wednesday (see below). This day, known as Ash Wednesday , became distinguished by placing ashes on the heads of the penitents as a sign of mortality and contrition. Gradually, all Christians began to join in this practice as the Lenten season took on an increasingly penitential flavor. As adult baptisms began to decrease, the catechetical emphasis also receded. By the beginning of the Middle Ages, the penitential character of Lent had taken firm hold. In time, this emphasis would be linked to an intense focus on the suffering and death of Jesus. The passion accounts in the four Gospels, or a combination of all four into one account, served as the primary texts for contemplation during the season.

As adult baptisms began to decrease, the catechetical emphasis also receded. By the beginning of the Middle Ages, the penitential character of Lent had taken firm hold.

Why are there 40 days in Lent?

Because no one was keeping historical records in the early centuries, there is a considerable lack of detail regarding how the length of the Lenten season was determined. As mentioned above, the observance may have only lasted a few weeks in the earliest times. But soon enough the number forty became a defining characteristic of Lent. That number, of course, is rich in meaning, with the account of Jesus’s forty-day temptation in the wilderness serving as the template. Just as the Lord spent forty days intently focused on the Word of God as he resisted temptation, so would the church use this season to guide Christians in learning from Jesus how to resist temptation. Other occurrences of the number forty in the Scriptures also add depth to the season: Elijah’s forty days of fasting while on the run (1 Kgs 19:8); forty years of wandering in the wilderness by the children of Israel (Exod 16:35); etc.

There are, however, some quirks in how the forty days have been counted. Because of various developments, Sundays came to be omitted from the count. The reason was because Sunday—the Lord’s Day—was never considered a day for fasting (see below). Because six weeks of only six days yields a total of thirty-six, four days were tacked on at the beginning of the season in order to reach the forty-day count. It was thus around the seventh century that Ash Wednesday was established as the first day in Lent in the Western church. This, it turns out, was also the time when the season moved toward an exclusively penitential focus.

social studies lesson on seasons

How does Ash Wednesday shape the season?

In the Old Testament, ashes figure prominently as a sign of contrition, penitence, and mourning (Esth 4:1; Job 2:8; 42:1; Isa 58:5; Jer 6:26; Lam 3:16; Ezek 27:30; Dan 9:3; Jonah 3:6). The example of Jonah is familiar to many and is most instructive. After hearing the preaching of Jonah, who proclaimed that God’s judgment was at hand, the king of Nineveh himself exchanged his royal robes for itchy sackcloth, and he sat in ashes. Aware of God’s judgment, ashes served as a reminder that apart from God, mortal man is nothing but dust of the ground. That’s exactly what God told Adam after the fall into sin. He had been formed from the dust of the ground, and one day it was to the ground that he would return (Gen 3:19).

As the penitential nature of the Lenten season took hold, the imposition of ashes became a physical reminder of our mortality. With the ashes typically came the words, “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.” The ashes, however, were not randomly applied; they are fashioned in the shape of the cross on the forehead. It was also on the forehead, you see, where the church traditionally traced the cross at baptism. While the theme of mortality is powerfully symbolized by the ashes, a more significant picture shines through. That ashen cross indicates that this sinner is marked with the sign of our redemption, the cross of Jesus.

At the time of the Reformation, many churches that broke away from the Roman Catholic Church dispensed with the imposition of ashes. In more recent times, however, the practice has reemerged among those same churches. Perhaps you’ve even seen Christians show up at work on Ash Wednesday with the ashen cross on their foreheads.

What is unique about the last week of Lent?

Some of the most significant observances in Lent occur during its final week, which is called Holy Week . During this week, the church observes specific events that occurred in the days leading up to Jesus’s crucifixion:

  • On the Sunday prior to Easter, the church observes the Lord’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem.
  • On Thursday, it’s to the upper room where Jesus joined his disciples for their final Passover together—and where he instituted Holy Communion. The day is often called Maundy Thursday. That rather uncommon name comes from the Latin mandatum , which means “commandment.” It was drawn from Jesus’s words on that night: “A new commandment I give to you” (John 13:34).
  • On Friday it’s to the cross, where the salvation of mankind was procured. Though it goes by many names, it is best known as Good Friday. While the word good hardly seems fitting, Christians have always understood the ultimate good that God accomplished on that day as the sinless Son of God gave his life for the world.

Over the centuries, a rich feast of liturgical texts developed for Good Friday that are still used in many places. These include the Reproaches, a series of Old Testament texts that are spoken by Jesus himself as an indictment against his people. Each reproach is followed by an intense prayer of penitence for Jesus to have mercy and save us. Also on this day the entire account of Jesus’s suffering and death as told by the evangelist John is read (John 18–19). In fact, the practice in some churches is to read the full passion account from each of the Gospels during Holy Week. It’s difficult to think of anything more impactful than to be immersed in all the details of what is unquestionably the most significant part of the Gospel accounts. Why else would each of the four Gospel writers devote two whole chapters to report on events that covered less than a day in Jesus’s ministry? Clearly, the suffering and death of our Lord was central to their proclamation!

What are some unique customs of the season?

While the placing of ashes on the forehead is perhaps the most recognizable custom of the season, there are others. The intensified devotion of the season of Lent, for example, is often characterized by three disciplines: almsgiving, prayer, and fasting. These disciplines draw inspiration from Jesus’s teaching in the Sermon on the Mount. For centuries, a portion of that sermon was read as the season was newly launched each year on Ash Wednesday. “When you give to the needy,” Jesus says, “don’t be like the hypocrites” (Matt 6:1–18). The same goes when we pray and fast. Our righteousness is not one of outward show, but in humbleness of heart, which the Father alone can see.

Among these traditional Lenten disciplines, there is little question regarding the second of the three: prayer. Of course Christians are going to pray! And most Christians agree that it is good to give to those in need. The practice of fasting, however, is not as universally practiced. While the expectation to fast exists in some Christian traditions, there is resistance in others, often out of a fear that the practice might lead to works righteousness. But even if the practice has been abused in the past, that does not negate the fact that intentional fasting can be fine training. Fasting can be a helpful reminder that “man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God” (Matt 4:4).

Another custom of the Lenten season is the silencing of the word “alleluia” from the church’s worship. While that exuberant Hebrew cry, “Praise the Lord,” ever resounds before the heavenly throne, the subdued nature of Lent invites a temporary muting of that praise. After forty days of holding back, the resounding alleluias on Easter morning signal that the Lenten fast has clearly ended.

But do we really need to tie ourselves to a calendar in order to observe all of this?

We don’t need the traditional church calendar to fast and pray. But this brings us back to the question we considered at the beginning: What benefit is there in following the church year?

Think of it this way: each of the major seasons of the year—Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, and Easter—has its own character. As we make our way through each of these seasons, we are surrounded by a host of biblical texts, prayers, and hymns that work together to shape our understanding of the merciful work of God on our behalf. While each season has various themes at play, there is usually one that is more prominent that the rest.

Consider the season of Advent, which is all about expectation. Yes, there are overtones of penitence as the church is called to be ready for the Lord’s final return. But above all else, this is the time to join with the ancient Israelites who waited centuries for the Lord to send his promised Son. Nothing encapsulates the season better than the opening line of Charles Wesley’s hymn, “Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus.”

Other seasons bring other emphases. Christmas is the celebration of peace on earth. Epiphany invites us to contemplate the incomprehensible revelation that this man from Nazareth is truly God. During Easter we join in the ultimate celebration that death has been swallowed up by Christ’s death, now proclaimed in the good news that he is risen from the dead.

The theme for Lent? This is the call to repentance, the acknowledgement that there is nothing good that dwells in us. Were it not for the sake of the innocent suffering and death of the Son of God, there would be no hope. Thus, Christians are invited to repent, even to lament over our sinful condition.

Is this the only time of the year when we show contrition? Of course not! Every day must be one of repentance. But in Lent it’s as though we go into the classroom where we will be taught the ins and outs of penitence. It’s our annual masterclass that schools us in the art of penitence. And so the catechetical emphasis of the early church continues. But soon enough, a mere forty days, the Lenten masterclass is ended and it’s on to the next one, the great celebration of the Lord’s resurrection.

And thus, year after year, we are reminded again and again of the wondrous deeds of our Savior who gave his life for our salvation.

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Take Your Bible Study Deeper, Faster

Paul Grime is professor of pastoral ministry and missions at Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, IN. He also serves as dean of the chapel and dean of spiritual formation. Prior to his arrival at the seminary in 2007, he served as executive director for the Commission on Worship of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod. In that capacity, he was the project director for the development of the church’s latest hymnal, 'Lutheran Service Book' (2006). 

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Unity without Compromise: Councils & Creeds for Today’s Ecumenical Dialogue

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To Creed or Not to Creed: Why You Need Creeds in the Christian Life

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The Nicene Creed: A Very Brief Introduction

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Augustine the Reader: Why You Should Take Up & Read ‘Confessions’

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History of Black women in P.E.I. now part of the province's school curriculum

3 new lesson plans are available to grade 8 social studies classes across the island.

social studies lesson on seasons

Social Sharing

Students and teachers in Prince Edward Island now have access to a new curriculum focused on the history of Black women in the province. 

The material was developed as part of the Black Women's History Project and includes three lesson plans for Grade 8 social studies classes. 

Topics include the transatlantic slave trade, life through the lens of an enslaved woman in P.E.I., and the resilience and resistance of newly freed slaves who lived in The Bog area of Charlottetown. 

Debbie Langston, a diversity consultant with the provincial Department of Education and one of the project leads, hopes teachers and students will learn as much about the history of Black Islanders as she did while she was helping to develop the lessons. 

Debbie Langston against a graphical background at the Black Culture Society of P.E.I.

"[Teachers are] really appreciative of the history background that we supplied for them as educators, knowing that they hadn't had this information when they were in school," Langston told Island Morning host Mitch Cormier. 

"I learned a lot [about] the contributions that the members of the Black community made to P.E.I. in terms of … the land clearing and the farming and all of these things that helped establish P.E.I. as a successful jurisdiction." 

social studies lesson on seasons

Development of the curriculum took about two and a half years, beginning during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Each lesson is accompanied by educational videos shot last year at the Black Cultural Society of P.E.I. that give greater context to the stories. 

  • New school resources explore the history of Black women on P.E.I.
  • The 'hidden' history of The Bog — Charlottetown's forgotten Black neighbourhood

Many of the people who filmed, directed and acted in the videos are members of the Island's Black community.

Langston said the videos and the anecdotal evidence from descendants of original Black Islanders make the lessons more engaging for the students. 

A black and white photo of a house on Kent Street in Charlottetown next door to The Bog School, which was located on the corner of Rochford and Kent streets in with residents of The Bog posing out front.

She hopes more can be added to the curriculum, such as the perspectives of the owners of enslaved people in P.E.I.

While the Department of Education is highlighting the launch of the curriculum during Black History Month, Langston said it can be used throughout the school year.  

"I would like [students] to understand that there is a rich history here and there's a diverse history here," she said. 

"But also, if they walk away asking questions about … certain histories that we're not talking about or haven't been told or were erased, and if they're looking at ways to make sure that doesn't happen again, then it would have been worth it."

Being Black in Canada logo is red and black text on a white background with a red and orange border and a black CBC logo.

For more stories about the experiences of Black Canadians — from anti-Black racism to success stories within the Black community — check out  Being Black in Canada , a CBC project Black Canadians can be proud of.   You can read more stories here .

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

social studies lesson on seasons

Stephen Brun works for CBC in Charlottetown, P.E.I. Through the years he has been a writer and editor for a number of newspapers and news sites across Canada, most recently in the Atlantic region. You can reach him at [email protected].

With files from Island Morning

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Seasons Dramatic Play | Spring Dramatic Play | Summer Dramatic Play

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  1. Seasons for Social Studies! by Debbie Bryant

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  2. Four Seasons Picture Sorting Posters and Worksheet

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  3. Four Seasons Activity

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  4. The Four Seasons

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  1. #class8#social chapter-3 Earth Movements and seasons

  2. Year 3 Social Studies, Lesson 19, Physical Characteristic of communities

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  4. Learning social Studies Lesson 1 For class 1 Learn with Meaning@bbclearningenglish

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  6. Standard: VII, Subject: Geography, Topic: How Seasons Occur Part-2 Module-1

COMMENTS

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    In this lesson, your students will learn about the seasons while exploring different ways that people celebrate events in each season.

  2. Seasons for Social Studies! by Debbie Bryant

    Seasons for Social Studies! 4.9 (227 ratings) 91,780 Downloads ; Grade Levels 1st - 4th Subjects Earth Sciences, Environment, Other (Social Studies - History) Resource Type Printables, Lesson, Centers Formats Included PDF Pages 9 pages Debbie Bryant 1.1k Followers Follow Description Reviews 227 Q&A More from Debbie Bryant Description

  3. PDF Social Studies Theme: Geography

    Social Studies Theme: Geography Lesson: Weather and Seasons Grade Level: 1-4 Overview: Students will be introduced to basic concepts dealing with weather, the four seasons of the year, and their correlation to each other. Approximate Duration: one class period National Social Studies Standards: NSS-G.K-12.3 Physical Systems

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  7. How to Teach Earth's Seasons in Middle School Science

    Teaching about Earth's seasons is a great way to integrate your science and social studies lessons. You can teach about the Earth's seasons during your space unit. You can connect this lesson to the study of ancient cultures who built temples to align to the Sun during the equinoxes and solstices. What Causes the Earth's Seasons?

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    Instructions Introduce the topic by asking students what their favorite season is. Briefly discuss. Next, show our Study.com video Geography of the Four Seasons. Pause at 2:21 and ask: Why are...

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    Social Studies: Seasons | Seasons (Gr. K) - TeacherVision Seasons Seasons Add to Favorites Through leveled practice children will explore the seasons. Hands on activity topics include hibernation, season appropriate clothing and creating seasonal background portraits. Grade: K Featured Kindergarten Resources REFERENCE

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    ⭐ Social Studies made simple and fun!⭐ Introduce your students to seasons and weather with these engaging printable activities and digital Boom Cards. This unit includes:☆ Anchor text☆ Sorting centers☆ Writing activities☆ Listening and reading comprehension☆ Emergent reader take home book Includes 2 sets of Boom cards for a review at the end o...

  11. Four Seasons on a Farm

    After conducting these activities, review and summarize the following key concepts: There are four seasons—winter, spring, summer, and fall—and each has its own characteristics. Seasons are a result of Earth's tilt on its axis as it spins and travels around the sun. Seasonal changes affect farm activities.

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  13. FREE SCIENCE LESSON

    These pages were taken from my All Year Social Studies TownBuilder product for grades 2-3 which is a comprehensive year-long study of all these strands. Seasons affect many parts of daily life. Climate, weather and the change of the seasons affect much of what we do each day. Many people choose where to live based on the climate.

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    Yes Please! Activities for Exploring the Four Seasons The changing from winter to spring to summer to fall is a great way to begin to talk with preschoolers about the passage of time. Even if your area does not have visible changes for each season, your preschoolers can begin to know what happens at different times of the year.

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    NYS Social Studies Common Core Standards and Next Generation Science Standards aligned! Changes happening in fall and an introduction to seasons and observation are all covered in this 10 day kindergarten Science/Social Studies Unit. Literacy skills are embedded into the lessons: Non-fiction text, speaking/listening, writing responses.

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    #sonalclasses #season #learningwithme #letslearn #learning Social Studies | Lesson-8 The Climate of our Country| Part-2Part-1 https://youtu.be/YXbURy2a9XoI ...

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    Discover the wonders of seasons with our free printable Social Studies seasons worksheets, designed to help students explore and understand the fascinating changes in nature throughout the year. ... class 5 class 6 class 7 class 8 Subjects. Math Science Social studies Community & Cultures. World History. civics. Social Skills. History. U.S ...

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  24. Lent: A Season to Dread or to Cherish?

    Think of it this way: each of the major seasons of the year—Advent, Christmas, Epiphany, Lent, and Easter—has its own character. As we make our way through each of these seasons, we are surrounded by a host of biblical texts, prayers, and hymns that work together to shape our understanding of the merciful work of God on our behalf.

  25. History of Black women in P.E.I. now part of the province's school

    Three new lessons centered on the history of Black women in P.E.I. are now available to Grade 8 social studies students across the province. ... and includes three lesson plans for Grade 8 social ...

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