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AP®︎/College Chemistry

Course: ap®︎/college chemistry   >   unit 4, stoichiometry.

  • Worked example: Calculating amounts of reactants and products
  • Limiting reactant and reaction yields
  • Worked example: Calculating the amount of product formed from a limiting reactant
  • Worked example: Relating reaction stoichiometry and the ideal gas law

Introduction

Balanced equations and mole ratios, example: using mole ratios to calculate mass of a reactant, step 1: convert known reactant mass to moles, step 2: use the mole ratio to find moles of other reactant, step 3: convert moles of other reactant to mass, want to join the conversation.

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Introduction to Stoichiometry

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Onyemachi Okoronkwo

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Introduction to Stoichiometry

Chemistry Steps

Chemistry Steps

stoichiometry introduction worksheet

General Chemistry

Stoichiometry.

This is a comprehensive, end-of-chapter set of practice problems on stoichiometry that covers balancing chemical equations, mole-ratio calculations, limiting reactants, and percent yield concepts. 

The links to the corresponding topics are given below.

  • The Mole and Molar Mass
  • Molar Calculations
  • Percent Composition and Empirical Formula
  • Stoichiometry of Chemical Reactions

Limiting Reactant

  • Reaction/Percent Yield
  • Stoichiometry Practice Problems

Balance the following chemical equations:

a) HCl + O 2 → H 2 O + Cl 2

b) Al(NO 3 ) 3 + NaOH → Al(OH) 3 + NaNO 3

c) H 2 + N 2 → NH 3

d) PCl 5 + H 2 O → H 3 PO 4 + HCl

e) Fe + H 2 SO 4 → Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 + H 2

f) CaCl 2 + HNO 3 → Ca(NO 3 ) 2 + HCl

g) KO 2 + H 2 O → KOH + O 2 + H 2 O 2

h) Al + H 2 O → Al 2 O 3 + H 2

i) Fe + Br 2 → FeBr 3

j) Cu + HNO 3 → Cu(NO 3 ) 2 + NO 2 + H 2 O

k) Al(OH) 3 → Al 2 O 3 + H 2 O

l) NH 3 + O 2 → NO + H 2 O

m) Ca(AlO 2 ) 2 + HCl → AlCl 3 + CaCl 2 + H 2 O

n) C 5 H 12 + O 2 → CO 2 + H 2 O

o) P 4 O 10 + H 2 O → H 3 PO 4

p) Na 2 CrO 4 + Pb(NO 3 ) 2 → PbCrO 4 + NaNO 3

q) MgCl 2 + AgNO 3 → AgCl + Mg(NO 3 ) 2

r) KClO 3 → KClO 4 + KCl

s) Ca(OH) 2 + H 3 PO 4 → Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 + H 2 O

Consider the balanced equation:

C 5 H 12 + 8 O 2 → 5CO 2 + 6H 2 O

Complete the table showing the appropriate number of moles of reactants and products.

How many grams of CO 2  and H 2 O are produced from the combustion of 220. g of propane (C 3 H 8 )?

C 3 H 8 (g) + 5O 2 (g) → 3CO 2 (g) + 4H 2 O(g)

How many grams of CaCl 2 can be produced from 65.0 g of Ca(OH) 2 according to the following reaction,

Ca(OH) 2 + 2HCl → CaCl 2 + 2H 2 O

How many moles of oxygen are formed when 75.0 g of Cu(NO 3 ) 2 decomposes according to the following reaction?

2Cu(NO 3 ) 2   → 2CuO + 4NO 2  + O 2

How many grams of MnCl 2  can be prepared from 52.1 grams of MnO 2 ?

MnO 2  + 4HCl → MnCl 2  + Cl 2  + 2H 2 O

Determine the mass of oxygen that is formed when an 18.3-g sample of potassium chlorate is decomposed according to the following equation:

2KClO 3 (s) → 2KCl(s) + 3O 2 (g).

How many grams of H 2 O will be formed when 48.0 grams H 2 are mixed with excess hydrogen gas?

2H 2  + O 2 → 2H 2 O

Consider the chlorination reaction of methane (CH4):

CH 4 (g) + 4Cl 2 (g) → CCl 4 (g) + 4HCl(g)

How many moles of CH 4 were used in the reaction if 51.9 g of CCl4 were obtained?

How many grams of Ba(NO 3 ) 2 can be produced by reacting 16.5 g of HNO 3 with an excess of Ba(OH) 2 ?

Ethanol can be obtained by fermentation – a complex chemical process breaking down glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide.

                                                  C 6 H 12 O 6    →    2C 2 H 5 OH   +    2CO 2                                                       glucose                   ethanol

How many mL of ethanol (d =0.789 g/mL) can be obtained by this process starting with 286 g of glucose?

36.0 g of butane (C 4 H 10 ) was burned in an excess of oxygen and the resulting carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) was collected in a sealed vessel.

2C 4 H 10 + 13O 2 → 8CO 2 + 10H 2 O

How many grams of LiOH will be necessary to consume all the CO 2 from the first reaction?

2LiOH + CO 2 → Li 2 CO 3 + H 2 O

13. Which statement about limiting reactant is correct?

a) The limiting reactant is the one in a smaller quantity.

b) The limiting reactant is the one in greater quantity.

c) The limiting reactant is the one producing less product.

d) The limiting reactant is the one producing more product.

Find the limiting reactant for each initial amount of reactants.

4NH 3 + 5O 2 → 4NO + 6H 2 O

a) 2 mol of NH 3 and 2 mol of O 2

b) 2 mol of NH 3 and 3 mol of O 2

c) 3 mol of NH 3 and 3 mol of O 2

d) 3 mol of NH 3 and 2 mol of O 2

Note:  This is not a multiple-choice question. Each row represents a separate question where you need to determine the limiting reactant.

How many g of hydrogen are left over in producing ammonia when 14.0 g of nitrogen is reacted with 8.0 g of hydrogen?

N 2 (g) + 3 H 2 (g) → 2 NH 3 (g)

How many grams of PCl 3 will be produced if 130.5 g Cl 2 is reacted with 56.4 g P 4 according to the following equation?

6Cl 2 (g) + P 4 (s) → 4PCl 3 (l)

How many grams of sulfur can be obtained if 12.6 g H 2 S is reacted with 14.6 g SO 2 according to the following equation?

2H 2 S(g) + SO 2 (g) → 3S(s) + 2H 2 O(g)

The following equation represents the combustion of octane, C 8 H 18 , a component of gasoline:

2C 8 H 18 (g) + 25O 2 (g) → 16CO 2 (g) + 18H 2 O(g)

Will 356 g of oxygen be enough for the complete combustion of 954 g of octane?

When 140.0 g of AgNO 3 was added to an aqueous solution of NaCl, 86.0 g of AgCl was collected as a white precipitate. Which salt was the limiting reactant in this reaction? How many grams of NaCl were present in the solution when AgNO 3 was added?

AgNO 3 (aq) + NaCl(aq) → AgCl(s) + NaNO 3 (aq)

Consider the reaction between MnO 2 and HCl:

MnO 2 + 4HCl → MnCl 2 + Cl 2 + 2H 2 O

What is the theoretical yield of MnCl 2 in grams when 165 g of MnO 2 is added to a solution containing 94.2 g of HCl?

Percent Yield

21. In a chemistry experiment, a student obtained 5.68 g of a product. What is the percent yield of the product if the theoretical yield was 7.12 g?

When 38.45 g CCl 4 is reacted with an excess of HF, 21.3 g CCl 2 F 2 is obtained. Calculate the theoretical and percent yields of this reaction.

CCl 4 + 2HF → CCl 2 F 2 + 2HCl

Iron(III) oxide reacts with carbon monoxide according to the equation:

Fe 2 O 3 ( s ) + 3CO( g ) → 2Fe( s ) + 3CO 2 ( g )

What is the percent yield of this reaction if 623 g of iron oxide produces 341 g of iron?

Determine the percent yield of the reaction if 77.0 g of CO 2  are formed from burning 2.00 moles of C 5 H 12  in 4.00 moles of O 2 .

C 5 H 12 + 8 O 2 → 5CO 2  + 6H 2 O

The percent yield for the following reaction was determined to be 84%:

N 2 ( g ) + 2H 2 ( g ) → N 2 H 4 ( l )

How many grams of hydrazine (N 2 H 4 ) can be produced when 38.36 g of nitrogen reacts with 6.68 g of hydrogen?

Silver metal can be prepared by reducing its nitrate, AgNO 3  with copper according to the following equation:

Cu( s ) + 2AgNO 3 ( aq ) → Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ( aq ) + 2Ag( s )

What is the percent yield of the reaction if 71.5 grams of Ag was obtained from 132.5 grams of AgNO 3  ?

Industrially, nitric acid is produced from ammonia by the Ostwald process in a series of reactions:

4NH 3 ( g ) + 5O 2 ( g ) → 4NO( g ) + 6H 2 O( l )

2NO( g ) + O 2 ( g ) → 2NO 2 ( g )

2NO 2 ( g ) + H 2 O( l ) → HNO 3 ( aq ) + HNO 2 ( aq )

Considering that each reaction has an 85% percent yield, how many grams of NH 3 must be used to produce 25.0 kg of HNO 3 by the above procedure?

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is widely used to treat pain, fever, and inflammation. It is produced from the reaction of salicylic acid with acetic anhydride. The chemical equation for aspirin synthesis is shown below:

stoichiometry introduction worksheet

In one container, 10.00 kg of salicylic acid is mixed with 10.00 kg of acetic anhydride.

a)  Which reactant is limiting? Which is in excess? b)  What mass of excess reactant is left over? c)  What mass of aspirin is formed assuming 100% yield (Theoretical yield)? d)  What mass of aspirin is formed if the reaction yield is 70.0% ? e)  If the actual yield of aspirin is 11.2 kg, what is the percent yield? f)  How many kg of salicylic acid is needed to produce 20.0 kg of aspirin if the reaction yield is 85.0% ?

3 thoughts on “Stoichiometry Practice Problems”

You forgot the subscript 3 for O in the molecular formula for acetic anhydride and the reaction is not balanced as written. For part F) it’s 18.1 kg and not1.81 kg as written in the final line of the solution.

Thanks for letting me know! Fixed.

You’re welcome!

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Stoichiometry Unit Plan Mark as Favorite (97 Favorites)

LESSON PLAN in Balancing Equations , Percent Yield , Stoichiometry , Conservation of Mass , Classification of Reactions , Limiting Reactant , Dimensional Analysis , Unit Plans . Last updated November 14, 2023.

The AACT high school classroom resource library has everything you need to put together a unit plan for your classroom: lessons, activities, labs, projects, videos, simulations, and animations. We constructed a unit plan using AACT resources that is designed to teach the concepts of stoichiometry and limiting reactants to your students.

Grade Level

High School

By the end of this unit, students should be able to

  • Apply a specific problem solving method to successfully answer any stoichiometry problem.
  • Balance a chemical equation using whole number coefficients.
  • Classify a reaction as either: synthesis, decomposition, single replacement, double replacement or combustion, based on its chemical equation.
  • Define and determine the limiting and excess reactants in a chemical reaction.
  • Determine the amount of a reactant or product given the amount of a product or reactant
  • Extend the idea of limiting reactant from a real-life scenario to a chemical equation.
  • Identify a reaction as endothermic or exothermic based on lab observations.
  • Identify and calculate the mass and moles of the excess reactant in a chemical reaction.
  • Identify and understand the implications of a limiting reactant in a chemical reaction.
  • Understand the concept of stoichiometry and perform mole-mole, mole-mass, and mass-mass stoichiometry problems.
  • Understand the importance of stoichiometry in an industrial setting.
  • Use a graphic organizer to construct a solution to a stoichiometry problem.
  • Use dimensional analysis to complete stoichiometry, percent yield, and theoretical yield calculations.
  • Use stoichiometry to confirm the reaction observed.
  • Visualize what is occurring in a chemical reaction in terms of limiting and excess reactants using particulate diagrams.

Chemistry Topics

This unit supports students’ understanding of

  • Balancing Equations
  • Chemical Reactions
  • Classification of Reactions
  • Decomposition
  • Dimensional analysis
  • Endothermic and Exothermic reactions
  • Law of Conservation of Mass

Limiting Reactant

  • Mole Concept
  • Mole to mole ratios
  • Observations
  • Percent yield

Stoichiometry

  • Theoretical Yield

Teacher Preparation : See individual resources.

Lesson : 8-12 class periods, depending on class level.

  • Refer to the materials list given with each individual activity.
  • Refer to the safety instructions given with each individual activity.

Teacher Notes

  • The activities shown below are listed in the order that they should be completed.
  • The number of activities you use will depend upon the level of students you are teaching.
  • The teacher notes, student handouts, and additional materials can be accessed on the page for each individual activity.
  • Please note that most of these resources are AACT member benefits .

Classroom Resources:

  • The lesson, Map It Out! shows students how to solve stoichiometry problems using a graphic organizer and Cornell notes. This six step process includes writing a balanced equation, identifying the known and unknown substances, selecting the correct mole ratio, determining the path to a solution, using conversion factors and calculating the theoretical yield.
  • The Stoichiometry Set-up Method lesson plan shows students how to follow a process of visual cues in combination with a step-by-step problem solving method for different types of stoichiometric problems. This method can be particularly beneficial for students who struggle with completing multi-step calculations. Read more about this lesson in the September 2015 issue of Chemistry Solutions .
  • For more advanced students, use the How to do Stoichiometry Problems lesson, which includes a series of templates for performing stoichiometry problems. The lesson also includes a practice worksheet for students to use to practice using the templates.
  • Follow up your lesson with the Baking Soda Stoichiometry lab which allows students to decompose baking soda and use stoichiometry to determine the proper balanced chemical equation of its decomposition.
  • Then use the Chemical Reactions and Stoichiometry simulation to give your students some more practice using a quiz that challenges their knowledge of reaction types, balancing equations and solving stoichiometry problems. During this quiz based activity, students are presented with five different reactions to analyze, each having three related questions to answer. The questions are randomized so students will not have the same order as their peers. Additionally, there are 20 possible chemical equations in the quiz, so students can complete it several times without receiving the same problems.
  • Finally, connect stoichiometry to real life with the Stoichiometry of Air Bags lesson plan which connects the concept of gram to gram stoichiometry calculations through a scenario related to air bags. Students are tasked with calculating the amount of sodium gas (NaN 3 ) that must be produced to inflate a vehicle air bag to the correct size. Follow-up practice problems are also provided.
  • Introduce the topic with the Limiting Reactant Animation which allows students to visualize at the particulate level what happens in a limiting reactant problem. A number of limiting reactant scenarios are animated, including a simple example of how to build a bike to introduce the concept of limiting reactant. Conservation of mass is also demonstrated by calculating masses from the mole quantities of the reactants and products.
  • Students observe a series of reactions between acetic acid and sodium bicarbonate in Zip-lock bags with the Introducing Limiting Reactants demonstration. After observing the reactions, students analyze the quantities of reactants used as well as the results in order to understand the concept of limiting reactants. They will also determine if the reaction is an endothermic or exothermic process based on their observations.
  • The demonstration, Understanding Limiting Reactants is a similar resource, performing a series of reactions between acetic acid and varying amounts of sodium bicarbonate in order to inflate several balloons. Students observe the reactions and analyze the quantities of reactants used as well as the results in order to understand the concept of limiting reactants.
  • The lab, Limiting Reactant in a Balloon , allows students to perform a reaction between acetic acid and sodium bicarbonate to determine the amount of product formed and the limiting reactant.
  • Students can also investigate the idea of limiting reactant using a brownie recipe with the activity, Limiting Reactants in Brownies .
  • In a similar lab, Limiting Reactant Candy , students use candy to help them understand what is meant by the term, "limiting reactant" and identify it in a non-chemistry situation.
  • One more activity, Cookie Stoichiometry , has students answer stoichiometry related questions using a chocolate chip cookie recipe.
  • If you teach students who struggle with completing calculations, they may benefit from the Map to Solving Limiting Reactant Problems lesson, which shows them how to follow a step-by-step problem solving method for limiting reactant stoichiometry problems.
  • Follow up calculations with the Limiting Reactant Activity to give your students practice drawing particle diagrams to demonstrate stoichiometry and limiting reactants.
  • Finish the topic with the Limiting Reactant Lab , where students react copper (II) chloride with aluminum to determine the limiting reactant and then isolate one product to determine the percent yield.

Summary Activities

  • Use the activity, Calculating Your Carbon Footprint to assess your student’s understanding of the topic. In this activity, students apply their knowledge of writing and balancing chemical equations as well as stoichiometry calculations to estimate their carbon footprint and then reflect on their carbon footprint and what it means. Read more about this lesson in the May 2017 issue of Chemistry Solutions .
  • Students create a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and oxygen gases to launch a soda bottle rocket in the Launching Rockets lab. In addition to student activity sheets, this resource includes comprehensive teacher notes, video instructions and NGSS alignment.
  • The lesson plan, Mechanisms and Properties of Airbags , teaches students about the mechanisms and properties of airbags, and examines the choice of airbag inflator from several points of view. This lesson is part of the resources put together by the 2016 AACT-Ford Content Writing Team and includes NGSS alignment along with links to several short videos about airbags.

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Stoichiometry (Worksheet)

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Given the following reaction:

\[H_2SO_4 + NaOH \rightarrow Na_2SO_4 + H_2O\]

If it takes 27.4 mL of 0.768 M \(NaOH\) to titrate 16.7 mL of \(H_2SO_4\), what is the concentration of the \(H_2SO_4\) solution? (hint: balance the equation first)

\[NaOH + HCl \rightarrow H_2O + NaCl\]

If 24.5 mL of \(HCl\) solution is needed to titrate 33.0 mL of a 0.112 M \(NaOH\), what is the concentration of the \(HCl\) solution?

\[Ba(OH)_2 + HClO_4 \rightarrow Ba(ClO_4)_2 + H_2O\]

How many mL of 1.2 M \(HClO_4\) is needed to neutralize 5.8 mL of a 0.44 M \(Ba(OH)_2\) solution?

\[H_2SO_4 + Na_2CO_3 \rightarrow Na_2SO_4 + H_2O + CO_2\]

Calculate the molarity of the \(H_2SO_4\) solution if it takes 40.0 mL of \(H_2SO_4\) to neutralize 46.7 mL of a 0.364 M \(Na_2CO_3\) solution.

Contributors

  • Mark Draganjac ( Arkansas State University )

Free Printable stoichiometry worksheets

Explore the world of stoichiometry with our free printable Science stoichiometry worksheets! Discover essential concepts and enhance your students' understanding in a fun and interactive way. Ideal for Science teachers and learners alike.

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Stoichiometry - Printable Stoichiometry Worksheets - Quizizz

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Stoichiometry worksheets are an essential tool for teachers who want to engage their students in the fascinating world of Science and Chemistry. These worksheets help students understand the fundamental concepts of stoichiometry, such as balancing chemical equations, calculating molar ratios, and determining limiting reactants. By providing a variety of practice problems, stoichiometry worksheets allow students to apply their knowledge and develop a deeper understanding of the subject matter. Teachers can use these worksheets to supplement their lessons, assess student comprehension, and provide extra practice for struggling learners. With a wide range of stoichiometry worksheets available, teachers can easily find the perfect resource to suit their students' needs and help them excel in Science and Chemistry.

Quizizz is an innovative platform that offers a plethora of resources for teachers, including stoichiometry worksheets and other educational materials. This interactive platform allows teachers to create engaging quizzes, polls, and presentations that can be easily shared with their students. By incorporating Quizizz into their lesson plans, teachers can provide a more dynamic and interactive learning experience for their students. In addition to stoichiometry worksheets, Quizizz offers a vast library of resources covering various topics in Science, Chemistry, and other subjects. Teachers can also customize the content to suit their specific needs and track student progress through the platform's analytics feature. With Quizizz, teachers have access to a wealth of resources that can help them enhance their students' learning experience and foster a deeper understanding of stoichiometry and other key concepts in Science and Chemistry.

Resource Topic: Stoichiometry

The mole, molarity, and density, autograded virtual labs, metals density problem, autograded virtual lab.

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to identify 3 unknown metals by measuring their density and comparing their measurements to the densities of known metals. In this randomized version, each student…

Creating a Stock Solution

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to create dilute solutions from a concentrated stock solution of acids or bases. They must first calculate the correct volumes of concentrated acid solution and water…

Scenario-Based Activities

Mixed reception, scenario-based activity.

An in-class activity in which students use molar mass calculations, the scientific method and basic knowledge of chemical reactions to solve a murder mystery. The activity begins with a 5 minute introductory video,…

[ChemVlab+] Powderade: Using Sports Drinks to Explore Concentration and Dilution

In this interactive activity, students first use color to determine which drinks are the most concentrated. Next students use the Virtual Lab to create solutions whose concentration matches that of two characters…

[ChemVlab+] The Factory: Using a City Water System to Explore Dilution

In this interactive activity, students must determine whether the factories in a fictional town are adhering to the guidelines the city has established for their emissions. The challenge is that, for some factories,…

[ChemVlab+] Gravimetric analysis and a closer look at drinking water

In this interactive activity, students first learn how gravimetric analysis can be used to determine the concentration of various species in water, through a combination of particulate-level representations and…

Simulations

Periodic table.

This simulation provides an interactive periodic table that also includes illustration of electron configurations in periodic trends. The schematic diagram to the right of the table plots the electron configurations…

This tutorial introduces the concept of the mole and how it is used in chemistry to connect macroscopic and molecular level scales. Practice is provided on the applied definition of the mole.

Solution Stoichiometry (Molarity)

This tutorial provides a quantitative overview of substances in solution and practice quantifying the amount of a substance in a solution. Guided practice in solution concentration calculations is provided.

Measuring Density

This tutorial explains the definition of density and explains how to perform density measurements. Guided practice in density calculations is also provided.

Calculating Molecular Weight

This tutorial provides instruction and practice on how to calculate the molecular weight of a substance from the atomic weights given on the periodic table.

Composition Stoichiometry

This tutorial provides instruction and practice converting between moles of a molecule and the moles of atoms that the molecule is composed of.

Significant Figures

This tutorial provides a brief review of the guides for determining how many significant figures to include when reporting your answer in a chemistry calculation. Guided practice in performing significant figures…

Dimensional Analysis/Stoichiometric Conversions

This tutorial provides a brief overview of dimensional analysis, including conversion between the amount of a substance expressed in "number of molecules" and the amount of a substance expressed in "moles of molecules".

Using Molecular Weight

This tutorial explains use the molecular weight to convert between the macroscopic scale (grams of a substance) and the microscopic scale (number of molecules of that substance). Guided practice performing molecular…

Making a Standard Solution from Another Solution: Dilution

This tutorial begins with the concept of concentration and expands this to the concept of dilution. It then provides and overview of the calculations and procedure for performing a dilution in the laboratory. Guided…

Virtual Labs

Glucose dilution problem, virtual lab.

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to create a 0.025M glucose solution from a standard 1M glucose solution. First, they calculate the correct volumes of 1M glucose solution and water to mix together…

Acid Dilution Problem

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to create 500mL of 3M HCl solution from a concentrated stock solution of 11.6M HCl. They must first calculate the correct volumes of 11.6M HCl solution and water to…

Cola and Sucrose Concentration Problem

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to prepare a sucrose solution for a soda recipe. They next calculate the concentration of their solution in terms of molarity, percent mass and density. Finally, they…

Making Stock Solutions from Solids

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to create stock solutions starting from solid salts. Students must first calculate the correct amount of solid to make the solution. Next, they prepare the solution…

Identifying the Unknown Metal (Metals Density Problem)

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to identify an unknown metal by measuring its density and comparing their measurements to the densities of known metals.

Identifying an Unknown Liquid from its Density

In this activity students use the virtual lab to design an experiment to determine the identity of mislabeled bottles using the densities of the solutions inside.

Alcohol Density Problem

Determine the concentration of an alcohol solution from its density.

Reaction Stoichiometry and Limiting Reagents

Chemical remediation of arsenic.

In this problem, students determine the limiting reagent in a reaction involving the remediation of arsenic from drinking water.

Determining Reactants and Products in a Solution of DNA

In this limiting reagents problem, students are given random volumes and concentrations of DNA solutions and are asked to predict what will remain after a reaction has occurred. Students can check their prediction…

Determine the Concentration of Unknown Silver Nitrate Solution

In this limiting reagents problem, students are asked to determine the amount of silver nitrate dissolved in a solution by performing a reaction with solid NaCl. In this randomized activity, each student is given…

Determining Stoichiometric Coefficients

Students use the virtual lab to determine how 4 unknown substances react with each other including their stoichiometric coefficients. In this randomized activity, each student receives a different reaction and…

Arsenic in Drinking Water

Set in the context of ground water contamination in Bangladesh, this stoichiometry and analytical chemistry activity examines the issues around identifying wells contaminated with arsenic. (Part of a larger online…

[ChemVlab+] Bioremediation of Oil Spills

Getting bacteria to eat oil is a powerful approach to cleaning up oil spills, and the first step is adding a bioremediation accelerator to form clumps that the bacteria will eat. In this activity, students perform…

Stoichiometry Applet

One of the first numerical problems encountered in introductory chemistry is that of "limiting reagents". This applet serves as a supplement to such calculations, providing imagery that helps students see beyond…

Reaction Stoichiometry

This tutorial introduces the concept of reaction stoichiometry, determining the amount of substance that is consumed or produced by a reaction. The tutorial then explains how to calculate how much of a reactant…

The Stoichiometry of Product Formation and Percent Yield

This tutorial provides on overview in determining the amount of product formed by a reaction. It explains how to perform calculations involving how much product was formed in a chemical reaction and explains theoretical…

Limiting Reagents

This tutorial describes how to determine the amount of each reactant that is consumed and each product that is produced in a given chemical reaction. Guided problems as well as a randomized calculation activity…

Gravimetric Determination of Arsenic

In this activity, students use the virtual lab to determine how 4 unknown substances react with each other including their stoichiometric coefficients.

Stoichiometry and Solution Preparation Problem

In this limiting reagents problem, students mix together solutions in different ratios in an attempt to produce a final solution that contains only 1 product.

Textbook Style Limiting Reagents Problems

Textbook-style practice limiting reagent exercises with that can be used as a way to "predict and check" your answers using the virtual lab.

Textbook Style Limiting Reagents Problem II

In this activity, students practice with experiments involving limiting reagents and the test their knowledge to determine the concentration of an unknown solution.

Predicting DNA Concentration

In this limiting reagents problem, students are given specific concentrations of DNA solutions and are asked to predict what products and reactants will remain after a specific volumes are mixed and reaction has…

Unknown Concentration of DNA Solution Problem

In this advanced limiting reagent problem, students use the virtual lab to determine the concentration of a solution of DNA by reacting it with known amounts of a fluorescent dye which binds to the DNA.

Empirical Formula and Mixtures

Mineral composition.

In this randomized calculation activity, students calculate the empirical formula of a compound given its elemental analysis. Step-by-step support and feedback is provided for students who need additional help.

Composition Determination of a Mixture

In this activity, students calculate the percent composition of a mixture of two arsenic-containing minerals. Step-by-step support and feedback is provided for students who need additional help.

Empirical Formula Introduction

This tutorial defines empirical formula and discusses various ways in which it is used.

Determining the Empirical Formula of a Compund from Its Molecular Formula

This tutorial explains how to calculate an empirical formula when given a molecular formula. Guided practice in performing empirical formula calculations from molecular weight is provided.

Determining the Empirical Formula from an Elemental Analysis

This tutorial explains how to obtain a substance’s the empirical formula from an elemental analysis. It discusses how to compare the empirical formula obtained from an elemental analysis with that from a molecular…

Composition of Mixtures

This tutorial explains the advanced topic of using a chemical reaction, such as burning in oxygen, to determine the relative composition of a mixture. Guided practice in performing calculations that involve a mixture…

Gravimetric Analysis

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COMMENTS

  1. PDF Stoichiometry: Problem Sheet 1

    How many moles of water are produced when 57 moles of nitrogen are made? 3. Calculate the mass of aluminum oxide produced when 3.75 moles of aluminum burn in oxygen. Answers: 1A. 30 mol Ag 1B. 30 mol AgNO3. 1C. 20 mol H2O 1D. 10 mol NO. 2A. 38 mol N2H4 2B. 19 mol N2O4. 2C. 76 mol H2O.

  2. Stoichiometry (article)

    Stoichiometry Google Classroom Introduction You might use stoichiometry skills to double a cookie recipe! Image credit: "Chocolate Chip Cookies" by Kimberley Vardeman on Wikimedia Commons, CC BY 2.0. A balanced chemical equation is analogous to a recipe for chocolate chip cookies.

  3. Stoichiometry (Worksheet)

    Q4. Given the following reaction: H2SO4 + Na2CO3 → Na2SO4 +H2O + CO2 H 2 S O 4 + N a 2 C O 3 → N a 2 S O 4 + H 2 O + C O 2. Calculate the molarity of the H2SO4 H 2 S O 4 solution if it takes 40.0 mL of H2SO4 H 2 S O 4 to neutralize 46.7 mL of a 0.364 M Na2CO3 N a 2 C O 3 solution.

  4. PDF 2 Gc + 1 M + 4 Cp 1 Sm

    An introduction to Stoichiometry You have spent a lot of time studying the various types of reactions that can occur in chemistry. You have also become experts in balancing chemical equations. In this activity, you will be introduced to simple stoichiometry. Stoichiometry is the chemical term

  5. Stoichiometry

    Section 1 - Introducing Stoichiometry. The activity begins with a short video (video 1) that introduces stoichiometry with a simple baking analogy. After answering related questions on a worksheet (see supporting information), the video teaches students to perform stoichiometric calculations and then applies them in a simple experiment.

  6. PDF Microsoft Word

    Microsoft Word - Stoichiometry Introduction Worksheet - Honors Honors Chemistry 1B Stoichiometry Worksheet #1 Name: ___________________________ Use Stoichiometry to solve the following problems. Use the conversion chart above to help. 1.

  7. Stoichiometry Basic Introduction, Mole to Mole, Grams to ...

    20:11. Stoichiometry - Limiting & Excess Reactant, Theoretical & Percent Yield - Chemistry. The Organic Chemistry Tutor. 309. 1. 25:16. Stoichiometry Basic Introduction, Mole to Mole, Grams to Grams, Mole Ratio Practice Problems. The Organic Chemistry Tutor.

  8. 4A: Moles & Stoichiometry (Worksheet)

    To do this, start by dividing the smallest number of moles into each of the numbers of moles of elements (i.e., set the smallest number to 1). This may yield integers, or it may yield decimal results that correspond closely to rational fractions. For example, 1.25: 2.75 = 1¼: 2¾ = 5: 11.

  9. Introduction to Stoichiometry worksheet

    Introduction to Stoichiometry Introduction to Stoichiometry Onyemachi Okoronkwo Member for 2 years 7 months Age: 13-15 Level: grade 10 Language: English (en) ID: 751667 23/02/2021 Country code: AE Country: United Arab Emirates School subject: Chemistry (1061818) Main content: Stoichiometry (2009395) Introduction to Stoichiometry

  10. Stoichiometry Practice Problems

    Stoichiometry Practice Problems. This is a comprehensive, end-of-chapter set of practice problems on stoichiometry that covers balancing chemical equations, mole-ratio calculations, limiting reactants, and percent yield concepts. The links to the corresponding topics are given below. The Mole and Molar Mass.

  11. Introduction To Stoichiometry Teaching Resources

    $4.99 Zip This lab experiment is a great introduction to stoichiometry. Students will study the reaction of copper (II) sulfate with iron. Students will then compare the actual mole ratio of iron and copper to the experimental ratio they obtained from their experiment.

  12. Classroom Resources

    Summary. The AACT high school classroom resource library has everything you need to put together a unit plan for your classroom: lessons, activities, labs, projects, videos, simulations, and animations. We constructed a unit plan using AACT resources that is designed to teach the concepts of stoichiometry and limiting reactants to your students.

  13. Mr. Christopherson / Stoichiometry

    S T O I C H I O M E T R Y : Lesson Plans & Lecture Outlines. * Unit 9 Notes - Stoichiometry pdf (20 pages) ( students) pdf. * Lecture Outline pdf. * Corwin Textbook - Publisher Website with Objectives and Quizzes Background. * Lesson Plans pdf. PowerPoint. * Full PowerPoint - Stoichiometry (160 slides) htm 1997-2003 PP. * Stoichiometry (11 slides)

  14. Stoichiometry (Worksheet)

    Q4. Given the following reaction: H2SO4 + Na2CO3 → Na2SO4 + H2O + CO2. Calculate the molarity of the H2SO4 solution if it takes 40.0 mL of H2SO4 to neutralize 46.7 mL of a 0.364 M Na2CO3 solution.

  15. 50+ stoichiometry worksheets on Quizizz

    Explore the world of stoichiometry with our free printable Science stoichiometry worksheets! Discover essential concepts and enhance your students' understanding in a fun and interactive way. Ideal for Science teachers and learners alike. stoichiometry. Stoichiometry. 10 Q. 10th - 12th. Stoichiometry. 10 Q.

  16. PDF Stoichiometry WorkSheet #1: Worked Solutions

    Stoichiometry WorkSheet #1: Worked Solutions Answer the following questions on your own paper. Show all work. Circle the final answer, giving units and the correct number of significant figures. 1. Based on the following equation, how many moles of each product are produced when 5.9 moles of Zn(OH)2 are reacted with H3PO4?

  17. Stoichiometry Worksheet

    Stoichiometry Calculation Practice Worksheet. Calculate the number of moles of NaOH that are needed to react with 500 g of H 2 SO 4 according to the following equation: H 2 SO 4 + 2 NaOH Na 2 SO 4 + 2 H 2 O. ANS: 10 mol 2. Calculate the mass of NH 3 that can be produced from the reaction of 125 g of NCl 3 according to the following equation:

  18. Introduction to Stoichiometry Worksheet with Answers

    Download Introduction to Stoichiometry Worksheet with Answers and more Chemistry Exercises in PDF only on Docsity! Chapter 9: Stoichiometry Stoichiometry A. Relating the mass of the _! is_Dtoarchiomatny ' 1. Stoichiometry follows the Law of Conservation of [Y\G'Ss 2.

  19. ChemCollective: Stoichiometry

    Resource Topic: Stoichiometry . The Mole, Molarity, and Density. Autograded Virtual Labs; Metals Density Problem Autograded Virtual Lab. In this activity, students use the virtual lab to identify 3 unknown metals by measuring their density and comparing their measurements to the densities of known metals. In this randomized version, each student…

  20. Stoichiometry Introduction Worksheet

    Stoichiometry Introduction Worksheet #1 STOICH.1 Balance chemical equations by applying the laws of conservation of mass and constant 9.1 composition. STOICH.3 Use mole ratios to describe the relationship between coefficients and moles in a 11.1 chemical reaction.

  21. Stoichiometry Introduction Worksheet

    Chemistry 1B Name: ___________________________ Stoichiometry Introduction Worksheet #1 STOICH.1 Balance chemical equations by applying the laws of conservation of mass and constant composition. 9.1 STOICH.3 Use mole ratios to describe the relationship between coefficients and moles in a chemical reaction. 11.1 STOICH.4 Use dimensional analysis t...

  22. DOCX Anoka-Hennepin School District / Homepage

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  23. Molar Gas Volume: Stoichiometry With Gases

    Filtration and Evaporation 4m. 17m. Test for Ions and Gases 14m. 5. BONUS: Mathematical Operations and Functions 47m. Multiplication and Division Operations 6m. Addition and Subtraction Operations 6m. Power and Root Functions - 6m. Power and Root Functions 20m.