Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, automatically generate references for free.

  • Knowledge Base
  • Dissertation
  • Dissertation Table of Contents in Word | Instructions & Examples

Dissertation Table of Contents in Word | Instructions & Examples

Published on 15 May 2022 by Tegan George .

The table of contents is where you list the chapters and major sections of your thesis, dissertation, or research paper, alongside their page numbers. A clear and well-formatted table of contents is essential, as it demonstrates to your reader that a quality paper will follow.

The table of contents (TOC) should be placed between the abstract and the introduction. The maximum length should be two pages. Depending on the nature of your thesis, dissertation, or paper, there are a few formatting options you can choose from.

Download Word doc Download Google doc

Instantly correct all language mistakes in your text

Be assured that you'll submit flawless writing. Upload your document to correct all your mistakes.

upload-your-document-ai-proofreader

Table of contents

What to include in your table of contents, what not to include in your table of contents, creating a table of contents in microsoft word, table of contents examples, updating a table of contents in microsoft word, other lists in your thesis, dissertation, or research paper, frequently asked questions about the table of contents.

Depending on the length of your document, you can choose between a single-level, subdivided, or multi-level table of contents.

  • A single-level table of contents only includes ‘level 1’ headings, or chapters. This is the simplest option, but it may be too broad for a long document like a dissertation.
  • A subdivided table of contents includes chapters as well as ‘level 2’ headings, or sections. These show your reader what each chapter contains.
  • A multi-level table of contents also further divides sections into ‘level 3’ headings. This option can get messy quickly, so proceed with caution. Remember your table of contents should not be longer than 2 pages. A multi-level table is often a good choice for a shorter document like a research paper.

Examples of level 1 headings are Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology, and Bibliography. Subsections of each of these would be level 2 headings, further describing the contents of each chapter or large section. Any further subsections would be level 3.

In these introductory sections, less is often more. As you decide which sections to include, narrow it down to only the most essential.

Including appendices and tables

You should include all appendices in your table of contents. Whether or not you include tables and figures depends largely on how many there are in your document.

If there are more than three figures and tables, you might consider listing them on a separate page. Otherwise, you can include each one in the table of contents.

  • Theses and dissertations often have a separate list of figures and tables.
  • Research papers generally don’t have a separate list of figures and tables.

Prevent plagiarism, run a free check.

All level 1 and level 2 headings should be included in your table of contents, with level 3 headings used very sparingly.

The following things should never be included in a table of contents:

  • Your acknowledgements page
  • Your abstract
  • The table of contents itself

The acknowledgements and abstract always precede the table of contents, so there’s no need to include them. This goes for any sections that precede the table of contents.

To automatically insert a table of contents in Microsoft Word, be sure to first apply the correct heading styles throughout the document, as shown below.

  • Choose which headings are heading 1 and which are heading 2 (or 3!
  • For example, if all level 1 headings should be Times New Roman, 12-point font, and bold, add this formatting to the first level 1 heading.
  • Highlight the level 1 heading.
  • Right-click the style that says ‘Heading 1’.
  • Select ‘Update Heading 1 to Match Selection’.
  • Allocate the formatting for each heading throughout your document by highlighting the heading in question and clicking the style you wish to apply.

Once that’s all set, follow these steps:

  • Add a title to your table of contents. Be sure to check if your citation style or university has guidelines for this.
  • Place your cursor where you would like your table of contents to go.
  • In the ‘References’ section at the top, locate the Table of Contents group.
  • Here, you can select which levels of headings you would like to include. You can also make manual adjustments to each level by clicking the Modify button.
  • When you are ready to insert the table of contents, click ‘OK’ and it will be automatically generated, as shown below.

The key features of a table of contents are:

  • Clear headings and subheadings
  • Corresponding page numbers

Check with your educational institution to see if they have any specific formatting or design requirements.

The only proofreading tool specialized in correcting academic writing

The academic proofreading tool has been trained on 1000s of academic texts and by native English editors. Making it the most accurate and reliable proofreading tool for students.

how to make a table of contents for dissertation

Correct my document today

Write yourself a reminder to update your table of contents as one of your final tasks before submitting your dissertation or paper. It’s normal for your text to shift a bit as you input your final edits, and it’s crucial that your page numbers correspond correctly.

It’s easy to update your page numbers automatically in Microsoft Word. Simply right-click the table of contents and select ‘Update Field’. You can choose either to update page numbers only or to update all information in your table of contents.

In addition to a table of contents, you might also want to include a list of figures and tables, a list of abbreviations and a glossary in your thesis or dissertation. You can use the following guides to do so:

  • List of figures and tables
  • List of abbreviations

It is less common to include these lists in a research paper.

All level 1 and 2 headings should be included in your table of contents . That means the titles of your chapters and the main sections within them.

The contents should also include all appendices and the lists of tables and figures, if applicable, as well as your reference list .

Do not include the acknowledgements or abstract   in the table of contents.

To automatically insert a table of contents in Microsoft Word, follow these steps:

  • Apply heading styles throughout the document.
  • In the references section in the ribbon, locate the Table of Contents group.
  • Click the arrow next to the Table of Contents icon and select Custom Table of Contents.
  • Select which levels of headings you would like to include in the table of contents.

Make sure to update your table of contents if you move text or change headings. To update, simply right click and select Update Field.

The table of contents in a thesis or dissertation always goes between your abstract and your introduction.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the ‘Cite this Scribbr article’ button to automatically add the citation to our free Reference Generator.

George, T. (2022, May 15). Dissertation Table of Contents in Word | Instructions & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved 8 July 2024, from https://www.scribbr.co.uk/thesis-dissertation/contents-page/

Is this article helpful?

Tegan George

Tegan George

Other students also liked, dissertation title page, how to write an abstract | steps & examples, thesis & dissertation acknowledgements | tips & examples.

  • How it works

researchprospect post subheader

How to Create the Best Table of Contents for a Dissertation

Published by Owen Ingram at August 12th, 2021 , Revised On September 20, 2023

“A table of contents is an essential part of any article, book, proceedings, essay , and paper with plenty of information. It requires providing the reader’s guidance about the position of the content.”

When preparing a  dissertation , you may cram as much information into it as appropriate. The dissertation may be an extremely well-written one with a lot of valuable information to offer. Still, all that information could become perplexing if the reader cannot easily find the information.

The length of dissertations usually varies from a few pages to a few hundred pages, making it very difficult to find information that you may be after.

Instead of skimming through every page of the dissertation, there is a need for a guideline that directs the reader to the correct section of the dissertation and, more importantly, the correct page in the section.

Also read:   The List of Figures and Tables in the Dissertation .

What is the Table of Contents in the Dissertation?

The table of contents is the section of a dissertation that guides each section of the dissertation paper’s contents.

Depending on the detail level in a table of contents, the most useful headings are listed to provide the reader concerning which page the said information may be found.

The table of contents is essentially a list found at the beginning of a  dissertation , which contains names of the chapters, section titles and/or very brief descriptions, and page numbers indicated for each.

This allows the reader to look at the table of contents to locate the information needed from the dissertation. Having an effective table of contents is key to providing a seamless reading experience to the reader.

Here in this article, we will uncover every piece of information you need to know to write the dissertation’s abstract.

This article helps the readers on how to create the best table of contents for the dissertation. An important thing to note is that this guide discusses creating a table of contents in Microsoft Word.

Looking for dissertation help?

Researchprospect to the rescue then.

We have expert writers on our team who are skilled at helping students with dissertations across a variety of disciplines. Guaranteeing 100% satisfaction!

quantitative dissertation

Styles for Dissertation Table of Contents

Making an effective table of contents starts with identifying headings and designating styles to those headings.

Using heading styles to format your headings can save a lot of time by automatically converting their formatting to the defined style and serves as a tool to identify the heading and its level, used later when creating a thesis table of contents .

Each heading style already has predefined sizes, fonts, colours, spacing, etc. but can be changed as per the user’s requirements. This also helps once all headings have been created and you intend to change the style of a certain type of heading.

All that is needed to change the style of a type of heading is automatically reflected on all headings that use the style.

Below is how the styles menu looks like;

Style-menus

To allocate a style to a heading, first select a heading and then click on one of the styles in the ‘Styles’ menu. Doing so converts the selected heading to the style that is selected in the Styles menu.

You can style a similar heading level in the same style by selecting each heading and then clicking on the style in the Style menu.

It is important to note that it greatly helps and saves time if you allocate styles systematically, i.e., you allocate the style as you write.

The styles are not limited to headings only but can be used for paragraphs and by selecting the whole paragraph and applying a style to it.

Changing Appearance of Pre-Defined Styles

To change the appearance of a style to one that suits you,

  • You would need to right-click on one of the styles to open a drop-down menu.

Changing-Apperance-of-Predefined-Styles

  • Select ‘Modify’ from the menu. This would display a window with various formatting and appearance options. You can select the most appropriate ones and click ‘OK.’ The change that you made to the style reflects on all headings or paragraphs that use this style.

Changing-Apperance-of-Predefined-Styles

Further changes can be made to headings, but using styles is an important step for creating the table of contents for the thesis. Once this step is completed, you can continue to create a thesis table of contents.

Also Read:  What is Appendix in Dissertation?

Things to Consider when Making APA Style Table of Contents

  • The pages before the body of the dissertation, known as the ‘Prefatory Pages,’ should not have page numbers on them but should be numbered in the Roman Numerals instead as (i, ii, iii…).
  • Table of Contents and the Abstract pages are not to contain any numbers.
  • The remaining pages would carry the standard page numbers (1,2,3…).
  • The section titles and page numbers in the dissertation table of contents should have dotted lines between them.
  • All the Prefatory pages, Sections, Chapter Titles, Headings, Sub Headings, Reference Sections, and Appendices should be listed in the contents’ thesis table. If there are a limited number of Tables or Figures, they may be listed in the dissertation’s table contents.
  • If there are many figures, tables, symbols, or abbreviations, a List of Tables, List of Figures , List of Symbols, and List of Abbreviations should be made for easy navigation. These lists, however, should not be listed in the thesis table of contents.
  • The thesis/dissertation must be divided into sections even if it is not divided into chapters, with all sections being listed in the table of contents for the thesis.

Generating Dissertation Table of Contents

First, to generate the Table of Contents, start by entering a blank page after the pages you need the table of contents to follow.

  • To do so, click on the bottom of the page you want before the Table of Contents.
  • Open the ‘Insert’ tab and select ‘Page Break’.
  • This will create a page between the top and bottom sections of the Table of Contents area.

Generating-Table-of-Contents-for-Your-Dissertation

By the time you reach this section, you would have given each heading or sub-heading a dedicated style, distinguishing between different types of headings. Microsoft Word can automatically generate a Table of Contents, but the document, particularly the headings, needs to be formatted according to styles for this feature to work. You can assign different headings levels, different styles for Microsoft Word to recognize the level of heading.

How to Insert Table of Contents

  • Place the cursor where you want to place the Table of Contents on the page you added earlier.
  • On the ‘References’ tab, open the Table of Contents group. This would open a list of different Table of Contents designs and a  table of contents sample.

Inserting-Table-of-Contents

  • You can select an option from the available Table of Contents or make a Custom Table of Contents. Although the available Table of Contents samples is appropriate, you may use a custom table of contents if it is more suitable to your needs. This allows you to modify different formatting options for the Table of Contents to satisfy your own

Inserting-Table-of-Contents-1

Updating the Table of Contents

As you proceed with editing your dissertation, the changes cause the page numbers and headings to vary. Often, people fail to incorporate those changes into the Table of Contents, which then effectively serves as an incorrect table and causes confusion.

It is thus important to update the changes into the table of contents as the final step once you have made all the necessary changes in the dissertation and are ready to print it.

These changes may alter the length of the  thesis table of contents , which may also cause the dissertation’s formatting to be altered a little, so it is best to reformat it after updating the table of contents.

To update the table of contents,

  • Select ‘Update Table’ in the References tab.
  • This would open a dialogue box. Select ‘Update Entire Table’ to ensure that all changes are reflected in the contents table and not just the page numbers. This would display all changes and additions you have made to the document (Anon., 2017).

Using this guide, you should understand how to create the best table of contents for the dissertation. The use of a Table of Contents, while being important for most written work, is even more critical for dissertations, especially when the proper methodology of creating the table of contents is followed.

This includes the guidelines that must be considered to correctly format the table of contents so that it may be shaped so that it follows the norms and is effective at helping the reader navigate through the content of the dissertation.

The use of Microsoft Word’s Table of Contents generation feature has greatly helped people worldwide create, edit, and update the table of contents of their dissertations with ease.

Here in this article, we will uncover every piece of information you need to know  how to write the dissertation’s abstract .

Are you in need of help with dissertation writing? At ResearchProspect, we have hundreds of Master’s and PhD qualified writers for all academic subjects, so you can get help with any aspect of your dissertation project. You can place your order for a proposal ,  full dissertation paper , or  individual chapters .

Is it essential to add a table of content to the dissertation?

Yes, it is important to add a table of content in a dissertation .

How to make an effective table of contents for the dissertation?

Using heading styles to format your headings can save a lot of time by automatically converting their formatting to the defined style and serves as a tool to identify the heading and its level, used later when creating a thesis table of contents.

How do I update the table of contents?

You may also like.

How to Structure a Dissertation or Thesis Need interesting and manageable Finance and Accounting dissertation topics? Here are the trending Media dissertation titles so you can choose one most suitable to your needs.

When writing your dissertation, an abstract serves as a deal maker or breaker. It can either motivate your readers to continue reading or discourage them.

Your dissertation introduction chapter provides detailed information on the research problem, significance of research, and research aim & objectives.

USEFUL LINKS

LEARNING RESOURCES

researchprospect-reviews-trust-site

COMPANY DETAILS

Research-Prospect-Writing-Service

  • How It Works

Want to Get your Dissertation Accepted?

Discover how we've helped doctoral students complete their dissertations and advance their academic careers!

how to make a table of contents for dissertation

Join 200+ Graduated Students

textbook-icon

Get Your Dissertation Accepted On Your Next Submission

Get customized coaching for:.

  • Crafting your proposal,
  • Collecting and analyzing your data, or
  • Preparing your defense.

Trapped in dissertation revisions?

How to create a table of contents for a dissertation (apa), published by steve tippins on june 20, 2022 june 20, 2022.

Last Updated on: 7th June 2024, 05:08 am

how to make a table of contents for dissertation

APA Dissertation Table of Contents Format Guidelines

  • The table of contents should be double spaced with one-inch margins on all sides. 
  • It should be written in the same font and size as the rest of your dissertation.  
  • At the top of the page, write Table of Contents , centered and in bold.
  • Although in the body of the paper you can use up to five levels of headings, up to three levels are usually provided in the Table of Contents. Including lower-level headings is optional. 
  • Indent each subheading five spaces. 
  • Write all text in title case. In title case, the first letter of major words is capitalized.
  • Provide the page number where the main headings and subheadings begin, and provide dotted lines between the heading and the page number.
  • Page numbers for the Dedication, Acknowledgements, and Preface should be in lower case Roman Numbers (i, v, x, l, c, d and m.). The page numbers for the rest of the text should be in Arabic numerals (1,2, 3, 4, etc.).

How to Write a Dissertation Table of Contents in APA Using Microsoft Word

Step 1. Instead of manually trying to write and format the table of contents, you can create a generated one using Microsoft Word. To do this, first go to the Home tab. This is where you will choose the styles for the table of contents. 

Step 2. The top-level headings will be your chapter titles, so on the right side of the tab, apply the Heading 1 style. 

Step 3. The second-level headings will be your subheadings, so apply the Heading 2 style. This will place your subheadings underneath your main headings.

screenshot of formatting a heading in Microsoft word

Step 4. You will now produce page links to your document. In the top ribbon, click on the References tab and select Table of Contents . 

how to make a table of contents for dissertation

Step 5. If the style does not indicate APA, such as the one below, use the drop down arrow to select APA. 

Step 6. Next, choose the number of levels that you want. In this case, you want to be able to have up to three levels, so choose Automatic Table 2 , which has the appropriate heading for a dissertation. 

Step 7. Click ok , and you are all set. Microsoft word will automatically generate your dissertation’s table of contents as you write it.

screenshot of table of content formatting in microsoft word

List of Tables and Figures

Your list of tables and figures will be written at the end of the list of information in the body of your paper. You will create these lists the same way that you created the main table of contents. 

However, the headings will be different. 

Instead of the heading “Table of Contents,” the headings will be “List of Tables” and “List of Figures.” (An example is provided in the table of contents example below.)

Sample of a Dissertation Table of Contents

In the example below, there are three level headings. The list of tables and figures are provided at the bottom of the other contents. The sections in your table of contents may be different depending on your college’s requirements. 

screenshot of APA Dissertation Table of Contents formatting

Updating the Dissertation Table of Contents

As you continue working on your dissertation, you will need to update the page numbers because they may change. 

how to make a table of contents for dissertation

To update the page numbers, right-click on the table of contents in your document and select the Update field . Then, the Update Table of Contents box will appear. 

You can choose to Update page numbers only or all the information in the table of contents by clicking on Update entire table . 

screenshot of updating page numbers in microsoft word

Note: For more information, refer to the APA Manual 7 th edition , sections 2.2-2.27.

Steve Tippins

Steve Tippins, PhD, has thrived in academia for over thirty years. He continues to love teaching in addition to coaching recent PhD graduates as well as students writing their dissertations. Learn more about his dissertation coaching and career coaching services. Book a Free Consultation with Steve Tippins

Related Posts

female phd student laughing at the laptop

Dissertation

Dissertation memes.

Sometimes you can’t dissertate anymore and you just need to meme. Don’t worry, I’ve got you. Here are some of my favorite dissertation memes that I’ve seen lately. My Favorite Dissertation Memes For when you Read more…

stressed out phd student in front of the computer

Surviving Post Dissertation Stress Disorder

The process of earning a doctorate can be long and stressful – and for some people, it can even be traumatic. This may be hard for those who haven’t been through a doctoral program to Read more…

asian phd student researching on laptop in the library

PhD by Publication

PhD by publication, also known as “PhD by portfolio” or “PhD by published works,” is a relatively new route to completing your dissertation requirements for your doctoral degree. In the traditional dissertation route, you have Read more…

  • University of Michigan Library
  • Research Guides

Microsoft Word for Dissertations

  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction, Template, & Resources
  • Formatting for All Readers
  • Applying a Style
  • Modifying a Style
  • Setting up a Heading 1 Example
  • Images, Charts, Other Objects
  • Footnotes, Endnotes, & Citations
  • Cross-References
  • Appendix Figures & Tables
  • List of Figures/Tables
  • Chapter and Section Numbering
  • Page Numbers
  • Landscape Pages
  • Combining Chapter Files
  • Commenting and Reviewing
  • Tips & Tricks
  • The Two-inch Top Margin
  • Troubleshooting
  • Finalizing Without Styles
  • Preparing Your Final Document

Automatic Table of Contents

An automatic Table of Contents relies on Styles to keep track of page numbers and section titles for you automatically. Microsoft Word can scan your document and find everything in the Heading 1 style and put that on the first level of your table of contents, put any Heading 2’s on the second level of your table of contents, and so on.

If you want an automatic table of contents you need to apply the Heading 1 style to all of your chapter titles and front matter headings (like “Dedication” and “Acknowledgements”).  All section headings within your chapters should use the Heading 2  style.  All sub-section headings should use  Heading 3 , etc....

If you have used Heading styles in your document, creating an automatic table of contents is easy.

  • Place your cursor where you want your table of contents to be.
  • On the References Ribbon, in the Table of Contents Group , click on the arrow next to the Table of Contents icon, and select  Custom Table of Contents .
  • We suggest that you set each level (Chapters, sections, sub-sections, aka TOC 1, TOC 2, TOC 3) to be single-spaced, with 12 points of space afterwards.  This makes each item in your ToC clump together if they're long enough to wrap to a second line, with the equivalent of a double space between each item, and makes the ToC easier to read and understand than if every line were double-spaced. See the video below for details.
  • If you want to change which headings appear in your Table of Contents, you can do so by changing the number in the Show levels: field. Select "1" to just include the major sections (Acknowledgements, List of Figures, Chapters, etc...).  Select "4" to include Chapters, sections, sub-sections, and sub-sub-sections.
  • Click OK to insert your table of contents.  

The table of contents is a snapshot of the headings and page numbers in your document, and does not automatically update itself as you make changes. At any time, you can update it by right-clicking on it and selecting Update field .  Notice that once the table of contents is in your document, it will turn gray if you click on it. This just reminds you that it is a special field managed by Word, and is getting information from somewhere else.

Modifying the format of your Table of Contents

The video below shows how to make your Table of Contents a little easier to read by formatting the spacing between items in your Table of Contents. You may recognize the "Modify Style" window that appears, which can serve as a reminder that you can use this window to modify more than just paragraph settings in the ToC. You can modify the indent distance, or font, or tab settings for your ToC, just the same as you may have modified it for Styles. 

an image of the Modify Table of Contents window, where you can set Show Levels

By default, the Table of Contents tool creates the ToC by pulling in Headings 1 through 3. If you'd like to modify that -- to only show H1's, or to show Headings 1 through 4 -- then go to the References tab and select Custom Table of Contents .  In the window that appears, set Show Levels to "1" to only show Heading 1's in the Table of Contents, or set it to "4" to show Headings 1 through 4.

Bonus tip for updating fields like the Table of Contents

You'll quickly realize that all of the automatic Lists and Tables need to be updated occasionally to reflect any changes you've made elsewhere in the document -- they do not dynamically update by themselves. Normally, this means going to each field, right-clicking on it and selecting "Update Field". 

Alternatively, to update all fields throughout your document (Figure/Table numbers & Lists, cross-references, Table of Contents, etc...), just select "Print". This will usually cause Word to update everything in anticipation of printing. Once the print preview window appears, just cancel and double-check that it updated things.

Mardigian Library Text Logo

  • Mardigian Library
  • Subject Guides

Formatting Your Thesis or Dissertation with Microsoft Word

  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedication, Acknowledgements, & Preface
  • Headings and Subheadings
  • Citations and Bibliography
  • Page Numbers
  • Tables and Figures
  • Rotated (Landscape) Pages
  • Lists of Tables and Figures
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Some Things to Watch For
  • PDF with Embedded Fonts

Table of contents

If you created your headings and subheadings with styles, and numbered your pages as demonstrated in the Page Numbers tutorial, Microsoft Word can be used to automatically generate a table of contents. Automatic generation of the table of contents has 2 advantages:

  • You don't have to manually type the table of contents. Since the entries in the Table of Content must match exactly the headings, subheadings, and page numbers in the thesis, manually creating a table of contents can lead to unintended errors.
  • You don't have to go back and edit the table of contents if something moves from one page to another. A couple of clicks and Word will automatically update the table of contents for you.

Below is a tutorial demonstrating how to create the table of contents.

Note: You should create the table of contents last to avoid needing to update the table of contents too often.

  • << Previous: Front Matter Lists
  • Next: Lists of Tables and Figures >>
  • Last Updated: Mar 21, 2024 2:35 PM
  • URL: https://guides.umd.umich.edu/Word_for_Theses

Call us at 313-593-5559

Chat with us

Text us: 313-486-5399

Email us your question

University of Michigan - Dearborn Logo

  • 4901 Evergreen Road Dearborn, MI 48128, USA
  • Phone: 313-593-5000
  • Maps & Directions
  • M+Google Mail
  • Emergency Information
  • UM-Dearborn Connect
  • Wolverine Access

UCI Libraries Mobile Site

  • Langson Library
  • Science Library
  • Grunigen Medical Library
  • Law Library
  • Connect From Off-Campus
  • Accessibility
  • Gateway Study Center

Libaries home page

Email this link

Thesis / dissertation formatting manual (2024).

  • Filing Fees and Student Status
  • Submission Process Overview
  • Electronic Thesis Submission
  • Paper Thesis Submission
  • Formatting Overview
  • Fonts/Typeface
  • Pagination, Margins, Spacing
  • Paper Thesis Formatting
  • Preliminary Pages Overview
  • Copyright Page
  • Dedication Page

Table of Contents

  • List of Figures (etc.)
  • Acknowledgements
  • Text and References Overview
  • Figures and Illustrations
  • Using Your Own Previously Published Materials
  • Using Copyrighted Materials by Another Author
  • Open Access and Embargoes
  • Copyright and Creative Commons
  • Ordering Print (Bound) Copies
  • Tutorials and Assistance
  • FAQ This link opens in a new window

The Table of Contents should follow these guidelines:

  • ​All sections of the manuscript are listed in the Table of Contents except the Title Page, the Copyright Page, the Dedication Page, and the Table of Contents.
  • You may list subsections within chapters
  • Creative works are not exempt from the requirement to include a Table of Contents

Table of Contents Example

Here is an example of a Table of Contents page from the Template. Please note that your table of contents may be longer than one page.

Screenshot of Table of Contents page from Dissertation template

  • << Previous: Dedication Page
  • Next: List of Figures (etc.) >>
  • Last Updated: May 31, 2024 9:34 AM
  • URL: https://guides.lib.uci.edu/gradmanual

Off-campus? Please use the Software VPN and choose the group UCIFull to access licensed content. For more information, please Click here

Software VPN is not available for guests, so they may not have access to some content when connecting from off-campus.

  • Privacy Policy

Research Method

Home » Table of Contents – Types, Formats, Examples

Table of Contents – Types, Formats, Examples

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Definition:

Table of contents (TOC) is a list of the headings or sections in a document or book, arranged in the order in which they appear. It serves as a roadmap or guide to the contents of the document, allowing readers to quickly find specific information they are looking for.

A typical table of contents includes chapter titles, section headings, subheadings, and their corresponding page numbers.

The table of contents is usually located at the beginning of the document or book, after the title page and any front matter, such as a preface or introduction.

Table of Contents in Research

In Research, A Table of Contents (TOC) is a structured list of the main sections or chapters of a research paper , Thesis and Dissertation . It provides readers with an overview of the organization and structure of the document, allowing them to quickly locate specific information and navigate through the document.

Importance of Table of Contents

Here are some reasons why a TOC is important:

  • Navigation : It serves as a roadmap that helps readers navigate the document easily. By providing a clear and concise overview of the contents, readers can quickly locate the section they need to read without having to search through the entire document.
  • Organization : A well-structured TOC reflects the organization of the document. It helps to organize the content logically and categorize it into easily digestible chunks, which makes it easier for readers to understand and follow.
  • Clarity : It can help to clarify the document’s purpose, scope, and structure. It provides an overview of the document’s main topics and subtopics, which can help readers to understand the content’s overall message.
  • Efficiency : This can save readers time and effort by allowing them to skip to the section they need to read, rather than having to go through the entire document.
  • Professionalism : Including a Table of Contents in a document shows that the author has taken the time and effort to organize the content properly. It adds a level of professionalism and credibility to the document.

Types of Table of Contents

There are different types of table of contents depending on the purpose and structure of the document. Here are some examples:

Simple Table of Contents

This is a basic table of contents that lists the major sections or chapters of a document along with their corresponding page numbers.

Example: Table of Contents

I. Introduction …………………………………………. 1

II. Literature Review ………………………………… 3

III. Methodology ……………………………………… 6

IV. Results …………………………………………….. 9

V. Discussion …………………………………………. 12

VI. Conclusion ……………………………………….. 15

Expanded Table of Contents

This type of table of contents provides more detailed information about the contents of each section or chapter, including subsections and subheadings.

A. Background …………………………………….. 1

B. Problem Statement ………………………….. 2

C. Research Questions ……………………….. 3

II. Literature Review ………………………………… 5

A. Theoretical Framework …………………… 5

B. Previous Research ………………………….. 6

C. Gaps and Limitations ……………………… 8 I

II. Methodology ……………………………………… 11

A. Research Design ……………………………. 11

B. Data Collection …………………………….. 12

C. Data Analysis ……………………………….. 13

IV. Results …………………………………………….. 15

A. Descriptive Statistics ……………………… 15

B. Hypothesis Testing …………………………. 17

V. Discussion …………………………………………. 20

A. Interpretation of Findings ……………… 20

B. Implications for Practice ………………… 22

VI. Conclusion ……………………………………….. 25

A. Summary of Findings ……………………… 25

B. Contributions and Recommendations ….. 27

Graphic Table of Contents

This type of table of contents uses visual aids, such as icons or images, to represent the different sections or chapters of a document.

I. Introduction …………………………………………. [image of a light bulb]

II. Literature Review ………………………………… [image of a book]

III. Methodology ……………………………………… [image of a microscope]

IV. Results …………………………………………….. [image of a graph]

V. Discussion …………………………………………. [image of a conversation bubble]

Alphabetical Table of Contents

This type of table of contents lists the different topics or keywords in alphabetical order, along with their corresponding page numbers.

A. Abstract ……………………………………………… 1

B. Background …………………………………………. 3

C. Conclusion …………………………………………. 10

D. Data Analysis …………………………………….. 8

E. Ethics ……………………………………………….. 6

F. Findings ……………………………………………… 7

G. Introduction ……………………………………….. 1

H. Hypothesis ………………………………………….. 5

I. Literature Review ………………………………… 2

J. Methodology ……………………………………… 4

K. Limitations …………………………………………. 9

L. Results ………………………………………………… 7

M. Discussion …………………………………………. 10

Hierarchical Table of Contents

This type of table of contents displays the different levels of headings and subheadings in a hierarchical order, indicating the relative importance and relationship between the different sections.

    A. Background …………………………………….. 2

      B. Purpose of the Study ……………………….. 3

      A. Theoretical Framework …………………… 5

             1. Concept A ……………………………….. 6

                    a. Definition ………………………….. 6

                     b. Example ……………………………. 7

              2. Concept B ……………………………….. 8

       B. Previous Research ………………………….. 9

III. Methodology ……………………………………… 12

       A. Research Design ……………………………. 12

             1. Sample ……………………………………. 13

               2. Procedure ………………………………. 14

       B. Data Collection …………………………….. 15

            1. Instrumentation ……………………….. 16

            2. Validity and Reliability ………………. 17

       C. Data Analysis ……………………………….. 18

          1. Descriptive Statistics …………………… 19

           2. Inferential Statistics ………………….. 20

IV. Result s …………………………………………….. 22

    A. Overview of Findings ……………………… 22

B. Hypothesis Testing …………………………. 23

V. Discussion …………………………………………. 26

A. Interpretation of Findings ………………… 26

B. Implications for Practice ………………… 28

VI. Conclusion ……………………………………….. 31

A. Summary of Findings ……………………… 31

B. Contributions and Recommendations ….. 33

Table of Contents Format

Here’s an example format for a Table of Contents:

I. Introduction

C. Methodology

II. Background

A. Historical Context

B. Literature Review

III. Methodology

A. Research Design

B. Data Collection

C. Data Analysis

IV. Results

A. Descriptive Statistics

B. Inferential Statistics

C. Qualitative Findings

V. Discussion

A. Interpretation of Results

B. Implications for Practice

C. Limitations and Future Research

VI. Conclusion

A. Summary of Findings

B. Contributions to the Field

C. Final Remarks

VII. References

VIII. Appendices

Note : This is just an example format and can vary depending on the type of document or research paper you are writing.

When to use Table of Contents

A TOC can be particularly useful in the following cases:

  • Lengthy documents : If the document is lengthy, with several sections and subsections, a Table of contents can help readers quickly navigate the document and find the relevant information.
  • Complex documents: If the document is complex, with multiple topics or themes, a TOC can help readers understand the relationships between the different sections and how they are connected.
  • Technical documents: If the document is technical, with a lot of jargon or specialized terminology, This can help readers understand the organization of the document and locate the information they need.
  • Legal documents: If the document is a legal document, such as a contract or a legal brief, It helps readers quickly locate specific sections or provisions.

How to Make a Table of Contents

Here are the steps to create a table of contents:

  • Organize your document: Before you start making a table of contents, organize your document into sections and subsections. Each section should have a clear and descriptive heading that summarizes the content.
  • Add heading styles : Use the heading styles in your word processor to format the headings in your document. The heading styles are usually named Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3, and so on. Apply the appropriate heading style to each section heading in your document.
  • Insert a table of contents: Once you’ve added headings to your document, you can insert a table of contents. In Microsoft Word, go to the References tab, click on Table of Contents, and choose a style from the list. The table of contents will be inserted into your document.
  • Update the table of contents: If you make changes to your document, such as adding or deleting sections, you’ll need to update the table of contents. In Microsoft Word, right-click on the table of contents and select Update Field. Choose whether you want to update the page numbers or the entire table, and click OK.

Purpose of Table of Contents

A table of contents (TOC) serves several purposes, including:

  • Marketing : It can be used as a marketing tool to entice readers to read a book or document. By highlighting the most interesting or compelling sections, a TOC can give readers a preview of what’s to come and encourage them to dive deeper into the content.
  • Accessibility : A TOC can make a document or book more accessible to people with disabilities, such as those who use screen readers or other assistive technologies. By providing a clear and organized overview of the content, a TOC can help these readers navigate the material more easily.
  • Collaboration : This can be used as a collaboration tool to help multiple authors or editors work together on a document or book. By providing a shared framework for organizing the content, a TOC can help ensure that everyone is on the same page and working towards the same goals.
  • Reference : It can serve as a reference tool for readers who need to revisit specific sections of a document or book. By providing a clear overview of the content and organization, a TOC can help readers quickly locate the information they need, even if they don’t remember exactly where it was located.

About the author

' src=

Muhammad Hassan

Researcher, Academic Writer, Web developer

You may also like

Research Design

Research Design – Types, Methods and Examples

Research Topic

Research Topics – Ideas and Examples

Ethical Considerations

Ethical Considerations – Types, Examples and...

Research Summary

Research Summary – Structure, Examples and...

Background of The Study

Background of The Study – Examples and Writing...

Research Paper Abstract

Research Paper Abstract – Writing Guide and...

TrueEditors

Table of Contents for Dissertation in 2024

Table of contents, introduction.

A dissertation could never begin with an introduction right off the bat. A table of contents in a dissertation template is imperative to guide your reader through the structure of your research.

The table of contents in a dissertation is a well-organized list of chapters, sections, and figures within your document, each heading corresponding to a page number. A good table of contents page should be accurate, simple to read, and well-formatted. The formatting of the table of contents is important to ensure a clean index that helps readers navigate your high-quality paper. It should generally be of two pages only.

Where should the Table of Contents be Placed?

Typically, within the template of a thesis or a dissertation, the table of contents is positioned prior to the introduction or the main body of chapters and right after the section devoted to acknowledgments.

How should a Table of Contents be Written?

A table of contents is written by listing out the titles or chapter names of sections within your research paper, in perfect chronological order. Subsequently, the subheadings or subtitles must also be included. Finally, the page numbers corresponding to each heading have to be placed in alignment with the headings.

Check with your university or other educational institution to determine if there are any formatting guidelines you must follow.

Generally speaking, three types of headings are included within the table of contents of a dissertation . Level one headings include the Introduction, Literature Review, Methodology, and Bibliography. The subsections of these are considered level two headings while further subsections are level three headings.

What are the Components of the Table of Contents?

The title of the paper appears at the top of a table of contents, followed by the chapter names and subtitles, all listed in chronological order. The page number of the corresponding headings is positioned at the end of each line.

Appendices and Tables

All appendices should be included in your table of contents. The number of tables and figures in your dissertation will determine their inclusion within the table of contents.

In case your dissertation has more than three figures and tables, consider placing them on a different page to list them out. Otherwise, you may include them all in the table of contents.

Why is a Table of Contents Important at all?

A table of contents is extremely important for two reasons:

  • First, it allows the reader to quickly locate information on specific subjects that have been organized as chapters or subtitles.
  • Secondly, the table of contents assists the writer in organizing their work and arguments to ensure that significant portions of their dissertation or thesis are not overlooked.

Tips to Write a Table of Contents:

  • Among scholars and researchers who author dissertations or theses, it is a general practice to work on the table of contents after completing the main body of the study. Regardless, a mock table of contents may be added to the dissertation template early on in the writing process to develop a basic framework that will guide how you will carry out your research study.
  • Note that a confusing or sloppy table of contents may result in a low score or lack of academic integrity due to the lowered readability of the dissertation.
  • The structure of your table of contents will be determined by your academic field and the length of your thesis. Regardless of the discipline, you must develop an organized list of all chapters in their order of appearance, with chapter subheadings properly labeled.
  • Subheadings should not be listed for one chapter and then forgotten for the next. While subheadings are not always necessary, they may be considered useful when dealing with a complex subject.
  • The titles of chapters and subheadings must correspond to the titles of the relevant pages. For example, if your first chapter is titled “Chapter 1: An Introduction,” it must appear on both the table of contents and as a heading for the first chapter.

Where should a Table of Contents Page be Created?

You may create a manually generated table of contents page in Microsoft Word, but the automatic function will make your life much simpler.

What not to Include in a Table of Contents?

The table of contents generally does not include the sections devoted to acknowledgments, the abstract, or the index page itself. As the first two of these are positioned before the index page, the reader will have already viewed these pages before arriving at the table of contents.

Creating an Automatic Table of Contents on MS Word –

To draft an automatic table of contents on Microsoft Word, certain heading styles must be used consistently throughout the text.

After this has been carried out, proceed as follows:

  • Include a title on your contents page. Ensure that you use the standard structure for your citation style or the instructions provided by your university/department.
  • Place your cursor where you want your table of contents to appear.
  • Locate the Table of Contents option in the Reference tab of the ribbon.
  • Select Custom Table of Contents by clicking the arrow next to the Table of Contents icon. You can choose which levels of headers to include in the table of contents and make manual modifications to each level by clicking the Modify button.
  • When you are ready to input the table of contents, click OK, and it will be generated automatically.

How does One Set Headings?

To set heading styles, follow these steps:

  • Determine the type of formatting required for each heading level. For example, if all level one headings should be Times New Roman, 12 pt, and boldfaced, this style may be applied to the level one headings.
  • Find the Styles option on the home tab to automate this formatting for all level one headings.
  • Highlight the level one heading and then right-click the Heading 1 style.
  • To match the selection, choose Update Heading 1.

Highlight the headings in question and click the styles you wish to format. Then, apply the formatting to each heading in the main body of the dissertation.

The Table of Contents is Automatically Updated

We recommend students to format and update their table of contents at the very end, before submitting or printing out their dissertation , as the alignment and arrangement of text may alter throughout the final revision process. Table of contents formatting in a dissertation must ensure preciseness and accuracy of page numbers.

You may click on the Update option on the menu that appears when you right-click the table of contents, which will update the page numbers or all information within it. We hope that this brief guide of a table of contents within the template of a dissertation provides you with further guidance on how to draft and format your dissertation’s table of contents.

-Isabell S.

how to make a table of contents for dissertation

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • KU Libraries
  • Subject & Course Guides
  • KU Thesis and Dissertation Formatting
  • Table of Contents

KU Thesis and Dissertation Formatting: Table of Contents

  • Formatting Specifics
  • Title and Acceptance Pages
  • Fonts and Spacing
  • Page Numbering
  • List of Figures
  • Rotating Charts or Tables
  • Working with Footnotes
  • Converting to PDF
  • Embedding Fonts
  • Completed KU Dissertations & Theses
  • About: Survey of Earned Doctorates
  • Copyright and ETD Release Form
  • Resources for KUMC Students
  • Thesis/Dissertation Filenames
  • LaTeX/BibTeX Support

Office of Graduate Studies Thesis and Dissertation Formatting Guidelines

These rules are taken from the KU Office of Graduate Studies Thesis or Dissertation Formatting Guidelines. To see the full thesis or dissertation formatting requirements, visit https://graduate.ku.edu/submitting

Creating an Automated Table of Contents

Located in the Home tab, Word’s Style Gallery makes it easy to set consistent, one-click formatting for headings throughout your document. It is these style settings that Word uses to create an automatic table of contents. Using an automatic table of contents will save you the huge headache of dealing with dot leaders, spacing, and having to completely re-type your table of contents if the order of your pages changes even a little. Plus, styles are easy to use! Step-by-step how-to instructions are included below for setting heading styles and then inserting a table of contents in Word 2010, Word 2013 or Word 2011 for Mac.

  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2010)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2013)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2011 for Mac)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2016 Mac)
  • Printed Instructions (TOC Word 2016 PC)
  • Creating a Manual-Entry Table of Contents

Working with Outline Style (Numbered) Headings

Numbered headings can be very tricky and many citation styles do not require their use. If you are working with a style the does require it, however, Shauna Kelly's blog has some great help .

Subject Guide

Profile Photo

  • << Previous: Page Numbering
  • Next: List of Figures >>
  • Last Updated: May 9, 2024 9:48 AM
  • URL: https://guides.lib.ku.edu/etd

Illustration

  • Dissertation & Thesis Guides
  • Basics of Dissertation & Thesis Writing
  • How to Create a Table of Contents for Dissertation, Thesis or Paper & Examples
  • Speech Topics
  • Basics of Essay Writing
  • Essay Topics
  • Other Essays
  • Main Academic Essays
  • Research Paper Topics
  • Basics of Research Paper Writing
  • Miscellaneous
  • Chicago/ Turabian
  • Data & Statistics
  • Methodology
  • Admission Writing Tips
  • Admission Advice
  • Other Guides
  • Student Life
  • Studying Tips
  • Understanding Plagiarism
  • Academic Writing Tips

Illustration

  • Essay Guides
  • Research Paper Guides
  • Formatting Guides
  • Basics of Research Process
  • Admission Guides

How to Create a Table of Contents for Dissertation, Thesis or Paper & Examples

Dissertation Table of Contents

Table of contents

Illustration

Use our free Readability checker

A dissertation table of contents is a list of the chapters and sections included in a dissertation or thesis, along with their page numbers. It helps to navigate the document easily and locate specific information. Each chapter or section should be listed with its corresponding page number. The table of contents should be formatted according to the guidelines of the specific style guide being used, such as APA or MLA.

We would guess that students usually start working on the table of contents at the last minute. It is quite apparent and makes sense, as this is the list of chapters and sections with page locations. Do you think it's easy? 

From our experience, it can be quite tricky to organize everything according to APA, Chicago, or any other academic writing style. In this blog, we will discuss how to write a table of contents for a research paper , thesis or dissertation in Microsoft Word. We will create it together to guide students through the process. 

Also, here you will find examples of table of contents created by thesis writers at StudyCrumb . Let’s go!

What Is a Table of Contents: Definition

It is obvious that the table of contents (TOC) is an essential manuscript part you can’t skip. If you are dealing with a dissertation, thesis or research paper, you need to know how to build it in accordance with academic guidance. This is a detailed roadmap for your work and outlined structure you can follow for a research presentation. 

In case you are working on an essay or report, you may not include the table of contents, as it is a short academic text. But for the research paper, thesis or dissertation, table of contents is essential and required. It is possible to say the same about any Master’s project. It should be located between the dissertation abstract and introduction chapter. In most cases, it is about 2-3 pages long. 

Our expert dissertation writing service prepared a great template that can be used for your work. Make your research formatting easy with ready solutions!

Types of Table of Contents

How to choose which table of contents will fit your research paper, thesis, dissertation, or report best? Make a decision based on your work length. Some academic writing styles, such as APA paper format or MLA style , have specific formatting for this list. 

However, we will outline the most commonly used typology:

  • Single-level table of contents. At this type, we use only chapters. For instance, you will have an Introduction, Literature Review, methodology, and other chapters with page numbers. It can be used for shorter research work. For long writing forms like manuscripts, it can be too broad, and you will need to go into details.
  • Subdivided table of contents. The most frequently used form to organize the contents table. It will include not only chapters but also sections — a level 2 subheading for each part. It will help to be more specific about what to expect in each part of your research work.
  • Table of contents with multiple levels. This is a more divided structure, including subheadings with a level 3 for each section. Quite often, those subheadings can be rewritten or deleted during the last editing. It is essential to keep them in the right order.

Before you decide which type will work best for you, let us share with you some examples of each formatting style.

Example of Table of Contents With a Single Level

Introduction: The Misinformation Roots ………..…… 3 Literature Review .....................................….....………… 10 Research Methodology and Design ……................. 24 Results.............................................................................. 28 Discussion ....................................................................... 32

Sometimes, you will need to put an extra emphasis on subsections. Check this layout to see how your subheadings can be organized.

Example of Table of Contents Page with Subdivided Levels

Introduction: Information War ............……………….. 3       Background…………………………………….………..…… 4       Current State ……………………………………...…...…… 5       Defining Research Questions………………………. 9 Literature Review………………………...……………..……... 11       The Roots of Information Warfare ………....… 11        Information Wars …………………………….………..… 14        Cyber Wars Research ........................................ 17

If you are working on a lengthy, complex paper, this outline will suit your project most. It will help readers navigate through your document by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable sections.

Multi-Level Table of Contents Page Example

Introduction……………………………………………….......……….… 3       Emergence of Climate Change ………..……....….….. 3       Key Activist Groups in Climate Change .............. 5              Greenpeace International ………..…………......... 9              European Climate Foundation …….……………. 10              WWF ……………………………………….……….............. 11        Significant Movements ……………….………....……… 13 Literature Review ……………………………………......…………. 15

What Sections Should Be Included in a Table of Contents?

To start with, the scientific table of contents should include all chapters and its subheading. It is important to choose the formatting that will give your readers a full overview of your work from the very beginning. However, there are other chapters that you may miss constructing the 2-pager table. So, let's look at all you need to include:

  • Dissertation introduction
  • Literature review
  • Research methodology
  • Results section
  • Dissertation discussion
  • Conclusion of a thesis
  • Reference list. Mention a number of a page where you start listing your sources.
  • Appendices. For instance, if you have a data set, table or figure, include it in your research appendix .

This is how the ideal structured dissertation or research paper table of contents will look like. Remember that it still should take 2 pages. You need to choose the best formatting style to manage its length.

Tables, Figures, and Appendices in TOC

While creating a table of contents in a research paper, thesis or dissertation, you will need to include appendices in each case you have them. However, the formatting and adding tables and figures can vary based on the number and citation style. If you have more than 3 tables or figures, you may decide to have all of them at the end of your project. So, add them to the table of contents. 

Figures, graphics, and diagrams in research papers, dissertations and theses should be numbered. If you use them from another source, ensure that you make a proper citation based on the chosen style guide.

Appendix in Table of Contents Example

Appendix A. Row Data Set…………………………………… 41 Appendix B. IBR Data………………………………………….… 43 Appendix C. SPSS Data………………………………………… 44

What Shouldn't Be Included in a Table of Contents?

When creating a dissertation table of contents, students want to include everything they have in a document. However, some components should not be on this page. Here is what we are talking about:

  • Thesis acknowledgement
  • Paper abstract
  • The content list itself

Acknowledgement and abstract should be located before the content list, so there is no need to add them. You need to present a clear structure that will help your readers to navigate through the work and quickly find any requested information.

How to Create a Table of Contents for a Research Paper or Dissertation In Word?

It may look like working with this list can take a long. But we have one proposal for our users. Instead of writing a table of contents manually, create it automatically in Microsoft Word. You do not need any specific tech knowledge to do this. Let’s go through this process step-by-step and explain how to make a table of contents for a research paper or dissertation in a few clicks.

  • Open Home tab and choose the style for your table of contents (ToC next).
  • Apply heading 1 to your chapters, heading 2 to the subheading, and if needed heading 3 to the level 3 heading.
  • Next, you are going to create a research paper or PhD dissertation table of contents. Open References and choose ToC.
  • Choose the citation style for your work. For example, let’s choose APL for now. Meeting all style requirements (bold font, title formatting, numbers) is essential.
  • Define the number of levels for your dissertation or thesis table of contents. In case you want to have 3 levels, choose Automatic Table 2.
  • You are done! Click ok, and here is your page with listed chapters!

You see how easy it can be! Every time you make changes to your text or headings, it will be automatic.

Updating Your Table of Contents in MS Word

Table of contents of a research paper or dissertation is created, and you continue to edit your work until submission. It is common practice, and with MS Word, you can automate all the updates. 

Let’s outline this process in our step-by-step guide!

  • Right-click on your ToC in a document.
  • Update field section is next.
  • Choose “update ToC."
  • Here, you can update your entire ToC — choose an option that works the best for you!

As you may see, working with automated solutions is much easier when you write a dissertation which has manifold subsections. That is why it is better to learn how to work on MS Word with the content list meaning be able to manage it effectively.

Table of Contents Examples

From our experience, students used to think that the content list was quite a complicated part of the work. Even with automated solutions, you must be clear about what to include and how to organize formatting. To solve the problem and answer all your questions, use our research paper or dissertation contents page example. Our paper writers designed a sample table of contents to illustrate the best practices and various styles in formatting the work. 

Check our samples to find advanced options for organizing your own list.

Example of Table of Contents in Research Paper

Research Paper Table of Contents Example

As you can see, this contents page includes sections with different levels.

Thesis/Dissertation Table of Contents Example

Thesis/Dissertation Table of Contents Example

Have a question about your specific case? Check samples first, as we are sure you can get almost all the answers in our guides and sample sets. 

>> Read more: APA Format Table of Contents

Tips on Creating a Table of Contents

To finalize all that we shared on creating the table of contents page, let’s go through our tips list. We outline the best advice to help you with a dissertation table of contents.

  • Use automated solutions for creating a list of chapters for your report, research papers, or dissertations — it will save you time in the future.
  • Be clear with the formatting style you use for the research.
  • Choose the best level type of list based on the paper length.
  • Update a list after making changes to the text.
  • Check the page list before submitting the work.

Bottom Line on Making Table of Contents for Dissertations/ Papers

To summarize, working with a research paper, thesis or dissertation table of contents can be challenging. This article outlines how to create a table of contents in Word and how to update it appropriately. You can learn what to include in the content list, how long it can be, and where to locate it. Write your work using more than one table of contents sample we prepared for students. It is often easy to check how the same list was made for other dissertations before finalizing yours. We encourage you to learn how to create a list with pages automatically and update it. It will definitely make your academic life easier.

Illustration

Not sure if your work 's quality level is enough for getting a top-notch result? We’ve got you covered! Our team of skilled academic writers is always ready to help once you ask “ write my dissertation for me !" Just select your writer, send them your requirements and get a custom study tailored to your instructions.

Joe_Eckel_1_ab59a03630.jpg

Joe Eckel is an expert on Dissertations writing. He makes sure that each student gets precious insights on composing A-grade academic writing.

Illustration

You may also like

APA table of contents

Find Info For

  • Current Students
  • Prospective Students
  • Alumni and Friends
  • Engage with Purdue
  • Research and Innovation

Quick Links

  • Departmental Format Advisors
  • iThenticate Requests
  • Copyright and Your Thesis
  • Editing, Proofreading, and Translation Services
  • Deposit Requirements
  • Request a Consultation
  • Deadlines  
  • Thesis & Dissertation Office

Thesis and Dissertation Policies and Practices

All thesis-option master’s students and doctoral students must follow the Thesis & Dissertation Policies that are outlined in the University Catalog – Policies and Procedures for Administering Graduate Student Programs .

Thesis Copyright Protection

Purdue University Policy I.A.1 , May 18, 2007, Intellectual Property , established that copyright ownership now resides with you, the author. The copyright symbol © is not required for works to be copyrighted. All candidates have the additional option of applying for registration of their copyright: This establishes a public record of theses/dissertations and confers additional legal rights, enabling individuals to file infringement suits and seek statutory damages as well as attorneys’ fees. Copyright registration can be filed here .

Specific questions regarding your rights and responsibilities under U.S. copyright law may be addressed to the Purdue University Copyright Office: 765.496.3864 or Stewart Center Room 246A.

Using Material Protected by Copyright

Purdue University promotes compliance with U.S. copyright law and understanding of the appropriate use of copyrighted works: Purdue University Policy I.A.3, January 1, 2015 Use of Copyrighted Materials for Educational and Research Purposes .

When quoting extensively from copyrighted material, the author must obtain written permission from the copyright holder. There is no precise relationship between the amount of text quoted and the requirement for written permission to use the material. The law governing copyright infringement is based on the fair use principle. Ordinarily, if you plan to quote more than 150 words of continuous text from copyrighted material, you should ask permission from the author. If the work you are quoting has significant commercial value, you should obtain permission to quote any complete or nearly complete text item or section. When your quotation of copyrighted material could have a negative impact on the existing commercial value of that material, obtain the copyright holder’s permission. Figures or other graphical material, including Web pages, should not be reprinted in your thesis without the author’s consent. Permission to use copyrighted material is usually granted on condition that acknowledgment is made. You will be responsible for any required payments.

You will be required to upload copyright permissions to HammerRR (Figshare) when depositing your thesis with the Purdue University Graduate School.

By depositing a thesis with the Purdue University Graduate School, you certify that all copyrighted material incorporated into the thesis complies with United States copyright law and that you have received written permission from the copyright owners for the use of their work, which is beyond the scope of the law. You also agree to indemnify and save harmless Purdue University from any and all claims that may be asserted or that may arise from any copyright violation.

Data subject to EAR, ITAR, DFARS Clause 252.204-7012, and other controlled data designators require increased security to establish compliancy with government regulations. Due to these increased security requirements an alternative method is required to be followed for controlled theses see Controlled Thesis Submission Process -  Guidance Document - Controlled Thesis Submission Process.

Publication of the thesis or dissertation is a required part of the deposit process. The university currently uses HammerRR to publish the thesis after which, your thesis will become an Open Access document with no additional cost to you.

All theses submitted to HammerRR are considered the final copy and are required to undergo a format review. Candidates will upload their thesis to HammerRR and Graduate School administrators will review the thesis for any format errors. In the event format changes are required, the administration will provide you a list of necessary changes that you should make and re-submit to HammerRR as soon as possible. Format reviews will continue until your format is in an acceptable condition. You may schedule a Formatting Consultation before your Final Exam (Defense) to avoid an extensive format review during the deposit process.

To further promote and preserve the intellectual contributions of its degree recipients, Purdue is also partnering with ProQuest / Clarivate to disseminate its emerging scholarship through the ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Global and Web of Science databases, which reaches thousands of institutions and millions of researchers worldwide. ProQuest also partners with major search and discipline-specific indexes for additional amplification and provides all of these services free of charge. By distributing your work with ProQuest, you will increase its visibility and impact within the global research community.  ProQuest recognizes the critical importance of embargos and will never publish a thesis until it has been released for dissemination by the university. You may withdraw your work from distribution at any time. You are eligible for a 10% royalty based upon sales and usage of the full text of the work. Please contact [email protected] with any questions and to set up your account to collect royalties.

Open Access Theses and Dissertations

Each student grants, without restriction, royalty free to Purdue University the nonexclusive right and license to reproduce, distribute, and display, in whole or in part, all theses and dissertations in any format now known or later developed for preservation and access in accordance with this agreement and will be made to the general public at no charge.

Benefits of an Open Access Thesis or Dissertation:

[1] Higher Citation Rates

The more users who can access a work, the more researchers that can cite that work.

[2] Better Global Visibility of Your Work

By making their work globally visible through open access, authors are allowing more scholars, more promising students and future scholars, less wealthy institutions, policy makers, news reporters, and the unexpected reader and citizen scholar to have access to their work who may not have otherwise had the ability or funds to access closed-access scholarship.

[3] Meeting the Land Grant Mission of the University

"Open access at Purdue can publicly showcase the scholarly output of the University and its community members, this provides greater visibility and traffic to your department, school, and ultimately the university. It can also show that scholars and researchers at Purdue think beyond their own disciplines by showcasing the interdisciplinary scholarship and research being created at Purdue. Finally, open access scholarship demonstrates accountability to the public that funds the university, while disseminating knowledge gained and created at Purdue; satisfying the public, land-grant mission of the university."

Students who wish to delay public release of their thesis must make the appropriate selection on the Electronic Thesis Acceptance Form (ETAF), provide the reasoning for the requested embargo, and make the same embargo selection in their HammerRR profile. The information that is provided to ETAF and HammerRR will be validated for consistency at the time of your thesis submission. If inconsistencies are present between the ETAF and HammerRR, the HammerRR profile will be updated by administrators to match what you have selected and what your committee chair has approved on the ETAF. Embargo periods are 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, or indefinite. During the embargo period, the deposited thesis abstract will be available for viewing; however, the main content will remain unpublished until the embargo period has expired. Students may embargo their thesis when applying for patents, have publications pending, or when proprietary rights are involved.

Confidentiality

Students who are applying for patents, are including sensitive ITAR/Export Controlled material, have a contract on file with Sponsored Program Services (SPS), or are including proprietary information may request confidentiality of their thesis. Confidentiality can be requested for one or two years and students who have contracts on file with SPS may request longer periods.

ADA Compliance and Accessible Documents

Before depositing your thesis with the Graduate School, the PDF copy of your thesis needs to be made accessible (the file will be accessible to screen readers and other assistive computer technologies) to the best of the author’s ability.

Word users: To check your thesis for accessibility it is recommended that you use Word 2013 or Word 2016 as these versions have a built-in accessibility checker. You can learn more about the accessibility checker from the Microsoft Accessibility Checker page. Once you convert your file to PDF, you should also verify that the accessible Word document has converted to an accessible PDF file.

LaTeX users: Authors using LaTeX should manually check the accessibility of their PDF document using Acrobat Pro.

Post-Facto Edits

The Graduate School expects candidates and departments to thoroughly review format and content of theses and dissertations prior to their electronic submission. The Graduate School does not generally permit post-facto revisions to ETDs once they have been accepted for deposit by the Thesis & Dissertation Office. Post acceptance changes are only permitted to correct significant textual, data, or mathematical errors affecting accuracy of content and which could be potentially embarrassing to Purdue University.

Exceptions to Graduate School policy will be considered on a case-by-case basis and may be requested by submitting a letter with justification for the exception to the Graduate School for consideration. Requests must be endorsed by the student’s major professor and the Head or Chair of the Graduate Program. The Graduate School may require additional approvals if the request may impact other offices within the University (see Section VII.I of the University Catalog).

A thesis authored at Purdue University should be structured and formatted using one of the below methods:

Traditional

A traditional thesis is a document that provides a complete and systematic account of your research. A typical traditional thesis suggests the following structure:

  • Statement of Approval page
  • Dedication (optional)
  • Acknowledgments (optional)
  • Table of Contents
  • List of Tables
  • List of Figures
  • Introduction
  • Literature Review
  • Conclusions and Recommendations
  • Appendix (optional)
  • Vita (optional)
  • List of Publications (optional)

* Thesis structure may vary by department. Please consult your committee for specific departmental requirements.

Article-based

An article-based thesis is a collection of published (or will be published) research articles consisting of an introductory and concluding chapter. A typical article-based thesis suggests the following structure:

  • Published Article #1
  • Published Article #2
  • Published Article #3

Theses authored using this structure will need to include acknowledgement of prior publication within the respective chapter. Although each journal may have specific statement requirements, the acknowledgment should be single spaced and appear 3 single spaces under the chapter title. Consult your publisher regarding required information that should appear in this acknowledgment.

Creative work

The Graduate School is prepared to accept theses in creative formats subject to departmental and committee approval. Students wishing to submit a creative work as their thesis requirement should consult with their committee chair and contact the Thesis & Dissertation Office with their proposal.

If the primary literature on a subject matter is in a language other than English and the thesis or dissertation addresses a community of scholars who publish in a language other than English, a student may elect to write the thesis in a language that all committee members speak and read and support its use in the thesis. In this case, the thesis should contain a title page and abstract page in English.

All West Lafayette , IUPUI , and Northwest candidates are required to submit the ETAF through their Plan of Study portal. This form should be submitted on the day of Defense or no later than the date of the Final Examination Deadline each semester.

Purdue Fort Wayne candidates are required to submit paper versions of Forms 9, 32, and 15 . Copies of these forms should be submitted to the Thesis & Dissertation Office prior to submitting the thesis to HammerRR.

Effective September 1, 2014, Purdue’s Graduate School requires that all theses and dissertations be reviewed using the iThenticate software and any issues identified by the software and any issues identified by the software addressed prior to the deposit of the final thesis or dissertation with the Graduate School. Satisfaction of this requirement will be certified by both committee chair and degree candidate on the ETAF. Click here for more information.

All master’s candidates are required to pay a Thesis Deposit Fee of $90 and Ph.D. candidates are required to pay a Thesis Deposit Fee of $125. The fees will be uploaded to a student’s myPurdue account within 5-10 business days after the HammerRR submission is approved.

West Lafayette, PFW, and PNW candidates will pay the fee through their local bursar’s office. IUPUI candidates will receive an e-bill following their successful thesis deposit.

Candidates are required to meet both departmental and Graduate School deadlines each term.

Thesis-option master’s and doctoral students are required to submit their thesis for a final format check to the Graduate School no later than the close of business (5:00pm ET) the day before the semester's designated deposit deadline date. Candidates who miss the semester's deposit deadline at 5:00, but still wish to graduate, must submit a request for a deposit extension (endorsed by committee chair and department head) to the Graduate School for full consideration. If approved, the student should expect to pay a Late Graduation Deadline Fee . Contact the Thesis & Dissertation Office for questions.

Ph.D. and master’s students are required to complete the Graduate School Exit Questionnaire (GSEQ). In addition to the GSEQ, Ph.D. candidates are required to complete the Survey of Earned Doctorates. These surveys will become available to complete during the semester the student registers as a candidate for graduation.

Communication

  • OneCampus Portal
  • Brightspace
  • BoilerConnect
  • Faculty and Staff
  • Human Resources
  • Colleges and Schools
  • Find Workshops
  • Funding Support
  • Purdue Graduate Student Government
  • Purdue Graduate Student Center
  • Data Requests
  • Staff Directory
  • OGSPS Toolkit
  • Catalogs, Manuals, Policies
  • Report a Concern
  • Publications

Ernest C. Young Hall, Room 170 | 155  S. Grant Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2114 | 765-494-2600

Contact OGSPS at [email protected] for accessibility issues with this page.

Have a language expert improve your writing

Run a free plagiarism check in 10 minutes, generate accurate citations for free.

  • Knowledge Base

Tables in your dissertation

Published on November 2, 2016 by Kirsten Dingemanse . Revised on January 31, 2020.

Dissertations and theses often include tables. One advantage of tables is that they allow you to present data in a clear and concise manner without having to provide a lengthy explanation in the text. This is particularly helpful in sections such as your results chapter.

Table of contents

Step 1. decide where to insert a table, step 2. create your table, example of a table in apa style, step 3. assign your table a number and title, step 4. clarify your table with a note (optional), step 5. cite the table within the text, where should you add a table.

Tables are often included in the main body of a dissertation, so that readers can view them straight away. In this case, place the table immediately above or below the paragraph in which you introduce or refer to it.

If you are not allowed to include tables within your main text or your tables are very long, you can instead put them in an appendix to your dissertation. However, bear in mind that doing so might make your text less readable, as readers will always have to turn to an appendix . It’s thus better to include at least key tables in the main document.

Be careful. Never directly import tables from a statistical analysis program such as SPSS, as these tables provide too much detailed information. For instance, if you just want to report the results of a t-test from SPSS, your table likely does not need to include figures related to the standard mean error.

Here's why students love Scribbr's proofreading services

Discover proofreading & editing

All word processing programs include an option to create a table. For example, in Word’s top menu bar you can either click on the “Table” tab or select Insert -> Table -> New.

word insert table

To keep your tables consistent, it’s important that you use the same formatting throughout your dissertation. For example, make sure that you always use the same line spacing (e.g., single vs. double), that the data is aligned the same way (namely center, left or right) and that your column and row headings always reflect the same style same (for example, bold).

If you are using Word, you can also opt to use one of the program’s pre-set table styles. Doing so will ensure that all of the tables throughout your dissertation have the same formatting. You can apply one of these styles by selecting the table and then selecting one of the preformatted “Table Styles.”

word tabedesigner

For examples of tables in MLA format , check our guide here .

Once you have decided where to incorporate a table, assign it a number (which should then be noted at the top of the table). Different numbering schemes can be used, but the easiest is to just use Table 1, Table 2 and so forth. Numbers will allow you to easily refer to the correct table within the text.

You can also set a table up so that Word automatically assigns it a number. We recommend that you do this, as it will ensure that your table numbers are always correct. For instance, if you add a new table in the middle of your dissertation, Word will automatically adjust the table numbers throughout the rest of the document. Using this Word feature also makes it easy to generate a list of tables .

Automatically numbering tables

To use automatic numbering, click on the tab ‘Reference’ and select ‘Insert Caption’.

insert-caption

Titling tables

It is important that you always give each table a title. If you use automatic table numbering, a table’s title will automatically be noted after its number.

A table title should be clear and comprehensive enough that it does not need to be explained in the text. Readers should be able to understand what a table contains solely on the basis of its title.

Make sure you also follow any title specifications that either your academic program or the citation style you are using dictates. For instance, in APA Style it is customary to put a table’s title under its number.

Prevent plagiarism. Run a free check.

A note can be used for information that helps to clarify the data in a table. For example, you can specify p-values, define abbreviations or explain further details related to a particular row or column. If you don’t have anything special to convey (and the table is your own creation), you don’t need to include a note.

Table from another source

If you have taken a table from another source, it’s mandatory that you explain this in a note. However, how this should be done varies by citation style . Below we explain how you should handle a table from another source according to the APA Style .

The APA Style specifies that you should write “Reprinted from” or “Adapted from” followed by the title and complete source information of the book or article that you have taken the table from.

Note for a table taken from a journal article
APA Style . Reprinted from “Title of Article“,  by AuthorLastName, FirstInitial., Year, , , p. PageNumber.
Example note . Reprinted from “The Theory of Planned Behavior”, by Ajzen, I., 1991, , , p. 179.
Note for a table taken from a book
APA Style . Reprinted from “ , by AuthorLastName, FirstInitial., Year, p. PageNumber, City, State/Country: Publisher.
Example note Note. Reprinted from by Simon, H. B., 2002, p. 107, New York, NY: Free Press.

It is important that you always refer to your table in the text. This helps readers to understand why the table is included and ensures that you don’t have any “free-floating” tables in your dissertation. All tables should have a clear function.

When citing a table in your running text, mention the table’s number instead of using phrases such as “the table below” (which can create confusion for your readers).

A numbered table in the main document

The table below shows that…

Table 1 shows that…

When referring to a table in an appendix, include both the table number and the appendix number.

A numbered table in the appendix

Table 2 (see Appendix 1) shows that…

There is evidence that… (see Table 2, Appendix 1)

Cross-references

If you automate the numbering of your tables, you can choose to apply cross-references. This feature creates links in your text that lead directly to the corresponding table when clicked. The advantage of this is that the numbering is always correct.

In Word, cross-referencing can be activated by selecting Insert ->  Cross-Reference from the top menu bar. From there set the “Reference type” to “Table” and “Insert reference to” to whatever you wish to include (for example, the entire caption or only the table’s name and number). Then select the table to which you want to link and click “Insert”.

cross-reference-word

Checklist: Tables

Each table has a number.

Each table has a clear, descriptive title.

All tables are consistently formatted according to my style guide or department’s requirements.

The content of each table is clearly understandable in its own right.

I have referred to each table in the main text.

I have correctly cited the source of any tables reproduced or adapted from other authors.

Your tables look great! Use the other checklists to improve your thesis or dissertation.

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Dingemanse, K. (2020, January 31). Tables in your dissertation. Scribbr. Retrieved July 8, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/tips/tables-in-your-dissertation/

Is this article helpful?

Kirsten Dingemanse

Kirsten Dingemanse

What is your plagiarism score.

Mon - Sat 9:00am - 12:00am

  • Get a quote

Table of Contents for Thesis Proposal

The table of contents for thesis proposal on the page that is dedicated to the chapters and their respective page numbers. The headings and subheadings are also mentioned on the page. The formatting for this page should be consistent and clear.

The table of contents is added after the introduction page and before the abstract. The table of contents should be of two pages, not more than that.

If you are planning on writing your thesis, do not skip this page and read further for the format and pattern of the table of contents.

In this post, you will learn:

What should you include in the table of contents?

Appendices and tables, the do’s and don’t’s, examples of the table of contents, a checklist for the table of contents.

Now that we have covered what the table of content is, you need to know what is included within the two pages of the list. If you feel like any portion of your dissertation is troubling you, you should get   dissertation writing help   by all means.

The table of content is an organized list that provides basic knowledge of what your thesis contains. The names of the chapters along with subheadings are added on the left side of the page. Whereas the number of the pages is written on the right side.

The table of contents is created for the sole purpose of locating a chapter and subheading by the reader. One should check with their universities and colleges if they have a specific format for the table of content.

Let us look into the general format of a table of content. The chapters (first level) and their second-level headings should be added to this. Remember, your motive behind creating this page is to make it easy for the reader to locate your chapters.

For example: Level one heading – Chapter 2. Literature Review Level two heading -2.1 Research Gap

The table of contents must include your appendices and table of figures. If you have more than three and four figures and tables, then they deserve their chapter. But if you dint get a lot of results from research, then those tables and figures can be shared in the list of contents.

Now the question arises, what does the appendices chapter include?

  • The original interviews, surveys, and questionnaires that were used to collect data for the research
  • Not more than two figures and tables should be added to the table of content.
  • If did not use a lot of abbreviations then you should share them in the table of content. But if you have tons of abbreviations and technical terms, then they should be listed in their chapters.

What are the Do’s and Don’t’s of the table of contents

The table of content may seem like a simple two-page table but in actuality can badly affect your thesis if not composed correctly. Due to this reason, one should be extra careful while numbering the pages and creating the different level headings.

Dos Don’ts
To make the list of content accurate, it should be created at the end of your thesis. No matter where the placement is. The list of content should not be made at the beginning of the thesis.
Create multiple drafts of the list of contents to avoid mistakes. The list should not be finalized in the first go, it should be checked and rechecked for accuracy.
The Acknowledgement and Abstract are added before the table of contents. Acknowledgment and Abstract of your thesis are not added to your table of content. Both of them are added before the table.
The heading number you add on top of each chapter should be the same as the one that is added on the right side of your table of content Do not make the mistake of numbering the chapters wrong. The entire table of content will become futile.
The figures and abbrevations are added to the table of content The list of figures and abbreviations should not be added to the table of content if the quantity increases by five.
The format of the table of content should be according to your university’s requirements. Do not submit your table of content without proofreading it.

Example of the table of contents

The page numbers assigned to the chapters in the table of contents should be the same as the number assigned at the beginning of each chapter. The example below demonstrates just that:

Checklist for the table of contents

To achieve perfection in the list of contents, you need a set of rules to follow. A starter’s checklist will guide you to do just that. Below is a checklist that will make sure your table of content is up to mark. And no matter what academic level of thesis you compose, this checklist can be used for all of them:

Collect the relevant information about the format according to your university and referencing style.

Start with the list of tables and bold the main chapters., all the titles of the chapter should be level one heading and the subheading should be level two., the numbers of the chapters and the page numbers given in the table should tally., all pages should be numbered after the chapters are written., final words:.

To create the table of contents for your thesis, use Microsoft word and customized it according to your thesis requirement. Apply the headings according to your style of preference. You can easily make the changes to the table itself at point of time with the help of the Microsoft Word table of contents.

Power Point      Google Slides

It is Time to Boost Your Grades with Professional Help

Improved scores.

Get Better Grades in Every Subject

Timely Delivery

Submit Your Assignment on Time

Experienced Writers

Trust Academic Experts Based in UK

Safety is Assured

Your Privacy is Our Topmost Concern

Hire a Writer

Subject* Accounting Accounts Law Advertising Aeronautical Engineering Agency Law Agriculture Animal Management Anthropology Archaeology Architecture Art Astrophysics Biochemistry Biology Biotechnology Business Chemical Engineering Chemistry Child Care Civil Engineering Civil Litigation Law Classics Commercial Law Commercial Property Law Communications Company Law / Business Law Comparative Law Computer Engineering Computing Constitutional / Administrative Law Consumer Law Contract Law Criminal Law Criminal Litigation Criminology Crisis Management Cultural Studies Design Drama E-Commerce Econometrics Economics Education Electrical Engineering Electronic Engineering Employment Law Engineering English Language Environmental Studies Equity Law Estate Management European Law European Studies Events Management Family Law Fashion Film Studies Finance Finance Law Forensic Science General Law Genetics Geography Geology History Hospitality Housing Housing Law HRM Human Rights I.T. Immigration Law Information Systems Intellectual Property Law International Development International Law International Relations International Studies Journalism Jurisprudence Land Law / Property Law Landlord and Tenant Law Languages Law Leisure Management Linguistics Literature Management Maritime Law Marketing Materials Science Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Mechanics Media Media and Information Technology Law Medicine Mental Health Law Midwifery Military Multimedia Negligence Law Neuroscience Nursing Nutrition Operations Management Oriental Studies Pathology Pharmacology Philosophy Physical Education Physical_Sciences Physics Planning / Environmental Law Plant Science Politics Product Design Professional Conduct Law Project Management Property Psychology Public Law Quantitative Methods Religion Restitution Law Risk Management Sciences Shipping Policy Social Work Sociology Software Engineering Sports Statistics Strategic Management Succession Law Surveying Tax Law Teaching Television Theatre Theology Tort Law Tourism Trusts Law Urban Studies Veterinary Wills / Probate Law Zoology Bio-informatics Biomedical Sciences Computer Forensics Data Mining Dentistry Engineering Business Management Environmental Engineering Environmental Management Environmental Science Epidemiology Geophysics Health and Safety Management Occupational Psychology Physiotherapy Public Health Real Estate Research Methods Security Studies Shipping and Trade Finance Sports and Exercise Science Supply Chain Management Sustainable Energy Telecommunication Engineering Toxicology Public Relations Other

Paper Type* Dissertation Dissertation Topics Dissertation-Abstract Dissertation Proposal Dissertation- Analysis Chapter Dissertation- Conclusion Chapter Dissertation- Introduction Chapter Dissertation- Literature Review Chapter Dissertation- Methodology Chapter Dissertation Editing and Proof Reading Essay Admission Essay Scholarship Essay Case Study Annotated Bibliography Assignment Book Report/Review Case Analysis Course Work Information and Communication/ Computer Technology Reaction Paper Research Paper Research Proposal Statistics Project Term Paper Thesis Thesis Proposal Laboratory Report Movie Review Multiple Choice Questions Power Point Presentation Article Speech Other

Education Under Graduate Graduate Masters PhD

IMAGES

  1. how to write the table of contents in a thesis

    how to make a table of contents for dissertation

  2. Free and customizable table of contents templates

    how to make a table of contents for dissertation

  3. how to write the table of contents in a thesis

    how to make a table of contents for dissertation

  4. 20 Table of Contents Templates and Examples

    how to make a table of contents for dissertation

  5. Master Thesis Table Of Contents Template Avery

    how to make a table of contents for dissertation

  6. How to Create a Table of Contents for a Dissertation (APA)

    how to make a table of contents for dissertation

VIDEO

  1. How to Make Table of Contents Google Docs [Quick Tutorial]

  2. Harvard Formatting of Headings, Table of Contents for Dissertation and Research Paper Only

  3. Generating a Table of Contents in Microsoft

  4. Quickly make a Table Of Contents

  5. 11/18 CREATE REFERENCE AND TABLE OF CONTENTS in Microsoft Word 2019/365

  6. Create Table Of Contents Google Docs

COMMENTS

  1. Dissertation Table of Contents in Word

    Right-click the style that says "Heading 1.". Select "Update Heading 1 to Match Selection.". Allocate the formatting for each heading throughout your document by highlighting the heading in question and clicking the style you wish to apply. Once that's all set, follow these steps: Add a title to your table of contents.

  2. Dissertation Table of Contents in Word

    In the 'References' section at the top, locate the Table of Contents group. Click the arrow next to the Table of Contents icon and select 'Custom Table of Contents'. Here, you can select which levels of headings you would like to include. You can also make manual adjustments to each level by clicking the Modify button.

  3. How to Create the Best Table of Contents for a Dissertation

    Generating Dissertation Table of Contents. First, to generate the Table of Contents, start by entering a blank page after the pages you need the table of contents to follow. To do so, click on the bottom of the page you want before the Table of Contents. Open the 'Insert' tab and select 'Page Break'.

  4. How to Create an APA Table of Contents

    Generating the table of contents. Now you can generate your table of contents. First write the title "Contents" (in the style of a level 1 heading). Then place your cursor two lines below this and go to the References tab. Click on Table of Contents and select Custom Table of Contents…. In the popup window, select how many levels of ...

  5. How to Create a Table of Contents for a Dissertation (APA)

    To do this, first go to the Home tab. This is where you will choose the styles for the table of contents. Step 2. The top-level headings will be your chapter titles, so on the right side of the tab, apply the Heading 1 style. Step 3. The second-level headings will be your subheadings, so apply the Heading 2 style.

  6. Creating a Table of Contents in Word for a Thesis ...

    In this detailed video tutorial, we'll walk you through the process of creating a professional Table of Contents (TOC) for your thesis or dissertation using ...

  7. Table of Contents

    An automatic Table of Contents relies on Styles to keep track of page numbers and section titles for you automatically. Microsoft Word can scan your document and find everything in the Heading 1 style and put that on the first level of your table of contents, put any Heading 2's on the second level of your table of contents, and so on.. If you want an automatic table of contents you need to ...

  8. Table of Contents

    Automatic generation of the table of contents has 2 advantages: You don't have to manually type the table of contents. Since the entries in the Table of Content must match exactly the headings, subheadings, and page numbers in the thesis, manually creating a table of contents can lead to unintended errors. You don't have to go back and edit the ...

  9. Table of Contents

    Here is an example of a Table of Contents page from the Template. Please note that your table of contents may be longer than one page. << Previous: Dedication Page

  10. Table of Contents, List of Figures, Tables for Dissertation

    Learn how to create a table of contents that includes a list of tables and a list of figures for your dissertation.Table of Contents:00:00 - Format the paper...

  11. Table of Contents

    In Research, A Table of Contents (TOC) is a structured list of the main sections or chapters of a research paper, Thesis and Dissertation. It provides readers with an overview of the organization and structure of the document, allowing them to quickly locate specific information and navigate through the document. ... How to Make a Table of ...

  12. Creating a Dissertation Table of Contents

    A quick screencast tutorial on how to create an automatic Table of Contents for your Dissertation.

  13. Table of Contents for Dissertation in 2024

    The table of contents in a dissertation is a well-organized list of chapters, sections, and figures within your document, each heading corresponding to a page number. A good table of contents page should be accurate, simple to read, and well-formatted. The formatting of the table of contents is important to ensure a clean index that helps ...

  14. KU Thesis and Dissertation Formatting: Table of Contents

    Creating an Automated Table of Contents. Located in the Home tab, Word's Style Gallery makes it easy to set consistent, one-click formatting for headings throughout your document.It is these style settings that Word uses to create an automatic table of contents. Using an automatic table of contents will save you the huge headache of dealing with dot leaders, spacing, and having to completely ...

  15. What should be included in a dissertation table of contents?

    In the references section in the ribbon, locate the Table of Contents group. Click the arrow next to the Table of Contents icon and select Custom Table of Contents. Select which levels of headings you would like to include in the table of contents. Click OK. Make sure to update your table of contents if you move text or change headings.

  16. PDF Thesis/Dissertation Table of Contents Configuration in Microsoft Word

    2. Click on References > Table of Contents > Automatic Table 2. 3. Note: until you label headings, you will get popup boxes telling you to start applying a heading style. This is why you should do headings first, then create the table of contents. 4. Edit the blue "Table of Contents" words to make them black, Times New Roman, size

  17. Table of Contents for Dissertation/ Research Paper & Example

    Open Home tab and choose the style for your table of contents (ToC next). Apply heading 1 to your chapters, heading 2 to the subheading, and if needed heading 3 to the level 3 heading. Next, you are going to create a research paper or PhD dissertation table of contents. Open References and choose ToC.

  18. Figure and Table Lists

    To do this, follow these steps: Navigate to the References tab, and click "Insert Caption," which you can find in the Captions group. Give your caption a name. In the Label list, you can select the label that best describes your figure or table, or make your own by selecting "New Label.". Next, you can insert the list of tables and ...

  19. Thesis and Dissertation Policies and Practices

    Students depositing their thesis (or dissertation) with the Purdue University Graduate School must certify that they have prepared the thesis while observing the provisions if Purdue University Policy III.A.2, November 18, 2011, Policy on Research Misconduct.Students will make the appropriate selection using the Electronic Thesis Acceptance Form (ETAF) 9.

  20. How to insert Table of contents in microsoft word in your thesis

    in this video i have explained how to insert table of content into your thesis. table of contents is required in Thesis or book at the start. Here I have exp...

  21. Tables in your dissertation

    Step 2. Create your table. All word processing programs include an option to create a table. For example, in Word's top menu bar you can either click on the "Table" tab or select Insert -> Table -> New. To keep your tables consistent, it's important that you use the same formatting throughout your dissertation.

  22. Table of Contents for Thesis Proposal

    The table of content is an organized list that provides basic knowledge of what your thesis contains. The names of the chapters along with subheadings are added on the left side of the page. Whereas the number of the pages is written on the right side. The table of contents is created for the sole purpose of locating a chapter and subheading by ...

  23. how to create Table of contents in Dissertation

    how to create Table of contents in Dissertation | Step by Step Guide#howto #dissertationwriting #tableofcontant~~~~~~~~~#~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~"Links, Facebook.ht...

  24. How to Create a Table of Contents

    Tips on how to create a table of contents in MS WordPlease don't forget to subscribe.. Thanks! =) #TableofContents#MSWord