Welcome to the on-line version of the UNC dissertation proposal collection. The purpose of this collection is to provide examples of proposals for those of you who are thinking of writing a proposal of your own. I hope that this on-line collection proves to be more difficult to misplace than the physical collection that periodically disappears. If you are preparing to write a proposal you should make a point of reading the excellent document The Path to the Ph.D., written by James Coggins. It includes advice about selecting a topic, preparing a proposal, taking your oral exam and finishing your dissertation. It also includes accounts by many people about the process that each of them went through to find a thesis topic. Adding to the Collection This collection of proposals becomes more useful with each new proposal that is added. If you have an accepted proposal, please help by including it in this collection. You may notice that the bulk of the proposals currently in this collection are in the area of computer graphics. This is an artifact of me knowing more computer graphics folks to pester for their proposals. Add your non-graphics proposal to the collection and help remedy this imbalance! There are only two requirements for a UNC proposal to be added to this collection. The first requirement is that your proposal must be completely approved by your committee. If we adhere to this, then each proposal in the collection serves as an example of a document that five faculty members have signed off on. The second requirement is that you supply, as best you can, exactly the document that your committee approved. While reading over my own proposal I winced at a few of the things that I had written. I resisted the temptation to change the document, however, because this collection should truely reflect what an accepted thesis proposal looks like. Note that there is no requirement that the author has finished his/her Ph.D. Several of the proposals in the collection were written by people who, as of this writing, are still working on their dissertation. This is fine! I encourage people to submit their proposals in any form they wish. Perhaps the most useful forms at the present are Postscript and HTML, but this may not always be so. Greg Coombe has generously provided LaTeX thesis style files , which, he says, conform to the 2004-2005 stlye requirements.
Many thanks to everyone who contributed to this collection!
Greg Coombe, "Incremental Construction of Surface Light Fields" in PDF . Karl Hillesland, "Image-Based Modelling Using Nonlinear Function Fitting on a Stream Architecture" in PDF . Martin Isenburg, "Compressing, Streaming, and Processing of Large Polygon Meshes" in PDF . Ajith Mascarenhas, "A Topological Framework for Visualizing Time-varying Volumetric Datasets" in PDF . Josh Steinhurst, "Practical Photon Mapping in Hardware" in PDF . Ronald Azuma, "Predictive Tracking for Head-Mounted Displays," in Postscript Mike Bajura, "Virtual Reality Meets Computer Vision," in Postscript David Ellsworth, "Polygon Rendering for Interactive Scientific Visualization on Multicomputers," in Postscript Richard Holloway, "A Systems-Engineering Study of the Registration Errors in a Virtual-Environment System for Cranio-Facial Surgery Planning," in Postscript Victoria Interrante, "Uses of Shading Techniques, Artistic Devices and Interaction to Improve the Visual Understanding of Multiple Interpenetrating Volume Data Sets," in Postscript Mark Mine, "Modeling From Within: A Proposal for the Investigation of Modeling Within the Immersive Environment" in Postscript Steve Molnar, "High-Speed Rendering using Scan-Line Image Composition," in Postscript Carl Mueller, " High-Performance Rendering via the Sort-First Architecture ," in Postscript Ulrich Neumann, "Direct Volume Rendering on Multicomputers," in Postscript Marc Olano, "Programmability in an Interactive Graphics Pipeline," in Postscript Krish Ponamgi, "Collision Detection for Interactive Environments and Simulations," in Postscript Russell Taylor, "Nanomanipulator Proposal," in Postscript Greg Turk, " Generating Textures on Arbitrary Surfaces ," in HTML and Postscript Terry Yoo, " Statistical Control of Nonlinear Diffusion ," in Postscript




computer science research proposal presentation

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A Practical Guide to Writing Computer Science Research Proposals

Everything you wanted to know about types of proposals, where to find funding opportunities, and what goes into a proposal—but were afraid to ask..

Nick Feamster

Nick Feamster

Great Research

In a previous post, I offered some thoughts on how to write a winning research proposal. I aimed to gear that…

Nick Feamster

Written by Nick Feamster

Neubauer Professor of Computer Science, University of Chicago. The Internet, research, running, & life. https://people.cs.uchicago.edu/~feamster/

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Thesis Proposal

In the thesis proposal, the PhD or DES student lays out an intended course of research for the dissertation.  By accepting the thesis proposal, the student’s dissertation proposal committee agrees that the proposal is practicable and acceptable, that its plan and prospectus are satisfactory, and that the candidate is competent in the knowledge and techniques required, and formally recommends that the candidate proceed according to the prospectus and under the supervision of the dissertation committee. It is part of the training of the student’s research apprenticeship that the form of this proposal must be as concise as those proposals required by major funding agencies.

The student proposes to a committee consisting of the student’s advisor and two other researchers who meet requirements for dissertation committee membership.  The advisor should solicit the prospective committee members, not the student. In cases where the research and departmental advisors are different , both must serve on the committee.

The student prepares a proposal document that consists of a core, plus any optional appendices. The core is limited to 30 pages (e.g., 12 point font, single spacing, 1 inch margins all around), and should contain sections describing 1) the problem and its background, 2) the innovative claims of the proposed work and its relation to existing work, 3) a description of at least one initial result that is mature enough to be able to be written up for submission to a conference, and 4) a plan for completion of the research. The committee commits to read and respond to the core, but reserves the right to refuse a document whose core exceeds the page limit. The student cannot assume that the committee will read or respond to any additional appendices.

The complete doctoral thesis proposal document must be disseminated to the entire dissertation committee no later than two weeks (14 days) prior to the proposal presentation. The PhD Program Administrator must be informed of the scheduling of the proposal presentation no later than two weeks (14 days) prior to the presentation. Emergency exceptions to either of these deadlines can be granted by the Director of Graduate Studies or the Department Chair on appeal by the advisor and agreement of the committee.

A latex thesis proposal template is available here .

PRESENTATION AND FEEDBACK

The student presents the proposal in a prepared talk of 45 minutes to the committee, and responds to any questions and feedback by the committee.

The student’s advisor, upon approval of the full faculty, establishes the target semester by which the thesis proposal must be successfully completed. The target semester must be no later than the eighth semester, and the student must be informed of the target semester no later than the sixth semester.

The candidacy   exam  must be successfully completed  before  the  proposal can be attempted.  The proposal must be completed prior to submitting the application for defense. [Instituted by full faculty vote September 16, 2015.]

Passing or failing is determined by consensus of the committee, who then sign the dissertation proposal form (sent to advisors by phd-advising@cs.  Failure to pass the thesis proposal by the end of the target semester or the eighth semester, whichever comes first, is deemed unsatisfactory progress: the PhD or DES student is normally placed on probation and can be immediately dismissed from the program. However, on appeal of the student’s advisor, one semester’s grace can be granted by the full faculty.

Last updated on October 16, 2023.

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Upcoming events, in the news, press mentions, dean boyce's statement on amicus brief filed by president bollinger.

President Bollinger announced that Columbia University along with many other academic institutions (sixteen, including all Ivy League universities) filed an amicus brief in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York challenging the Executive Order regarding immigrants from seven designated countries and refugees. Among other things, the brief asserts that “safety and security concerns can be addressed in a manner that is consistent with the values America has always stood for, including the free flow of ideas and people across borders and the welcoming of immigrants to our universities.”

This recent action provides a moment for us to collectively reflect on our community within Columbia Engineering and the importance of our commitment to maintaining an open and welcoming community for all students, faculty, researchers and administrative staff. As a School of Engineering and Applied Science, we are fortunate to attract students and faculty from diverse backgrounds, from across the country, and from around the world. It is a great benefit to be able to gather engineers and scientists of so many different perspectives and talents – all with a commitment to learning, a focus on pushing the frontiers of knowledge and discovery, and with a passion for translating our work to impact humanity.

I am proud of our community, and wish to take this opportunity to reinforce our collective commitment to maintaining an open and collegial environment. We are fortunate to have the privilege to learn from one another, and to study, work, and live together in such a dynamic and vibrant place as Columbia.

Mary C. Boyce Dean of Engineering Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Professor

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Thesis Proposal for PhD in Computer Science

The proposal document, examination committee, the examination, examination results.

The Proposal Examination can have one of two results:

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PhD Thesis Proposal

After passing the area process you must form a thesis committee and defend a thesis proposal. The proposal defense constitutes the ‘Ph.D. qualifying exam’ discussed in the University’s  Graduate Studies Bulletin  and  Regulations and Policies Concerning Graduate Studies.

Students must perform research that is a significant contribution to the field during their third year. This can be satisfied by:

  • Writing a paper that is accepted in a respectable refereed conference or journal
  • Producing a paper of similar quality (quality of paper judged by the dissertation advisory committee)
  • Incorporating the contribution in the required thesis proposal

Dissertation Advisor and Preliminary Advisory Committee

Soon after passing the area process, you should concentrate on narrowing down your interests to more specific ideas, such as:

  • “Truth Maintenance in Natural Language”
  • “Collapsing Complexity Classes via Counting”
  • “Parallel Visual Shape Recognition”
  • “Latency Tolerance in Distributed Shared Memory Systems”

Part of this process will be exploring ideas with faculty and finding a dissertation advisor and a preliminary advisory committee.

All students must register their dissertation advisor and a preliminary advisory committee with the graduate coordinator  no later than December 31 in their third year.

Your advisor will play a major role of guiding you through the process of completing a PhD. Your advisor will:

  • Help you in planning your thesis proposal defense
  • Point you towards to appropriate literature
  • Advise proposal-related (and other) research
  • Read drafts of your proposal
  • Giving general advice

The advisor also plays a crucial role in the actual exam itself. Choosing an advisor should not be done lightly; changing advisors can significantly delay completion of your studies.

The preliminary advisory committee must contain:

  • Your dissertation advisor
  • At least three University of Rochester faculty members holding the rank of at least assistant professor
  • Three department members*

*This is a department requirement. Exceptions can be granted by the chair.

A faculty member from outside the department can also be included, and must be included when the final dissertation advisory committee is formed in the second term of the third year.

Thesis Topic

After choosing an advisor and a general category, the next step is to decide what you really want to do. This involves finding, with the help of your advisor, a suitable topic.

After choosing a topics students should search through literature to answer the following questions:

  • What (if anything) has been done already?
  • What has not been done?
  • What are the major gaps in previous work?
  • What are recognized “next steps”?

After you have a grasp of the area and the problem, you will need to outline how your research will address the problem. This outline should include ideas on:

  • How the research will attack the problem
  • What it will not attack
  • How it will fit in with previous work
  • What the essential contribution of the work will be

You should be actively engaged in research on the topic by the fall of your third year.

Dissertation Advisory Committee

Your preliminary advisory committee members will usually become your dissertation advisory committee. If your preliminary advisory committee had no outside member, you must bring one on board at this time.

The committee members should be Rochester faculty members holding the rank of at least assistant professor, and three should be from the Department of Computer Science. (For exceptions, see the section above on forming a preliminary advisory committee .)

Each member must sign your thesis proposal defense form immediately after the thesis proposal defense. Your advisor should promptly return this form to the graduate program secretary.

Producing a Thesis Proposal

This proposal should explain:

  • The context of the problem
  • The problem itself
  • Previous approaches
  • Your proposed research

You should also include a well-researched bibliography. The thesis proposal should be of high quality in style, content, and exposition.

The thesis proposal and all other publications you have written during the year should be distributed to the dissertation advisory committee at least ten days before your thesis proposal defense. Students should ideally distribute materials before even scheduling the defense.

The thesis proposal will usually describe your:

  • Third-year research
  • The specific research directions you will pursue in the immediate future
  • The general research directions you will pursue in the more distant future
  • The theme that will unify your research into a coherent PhD dissertation

The thesis proposal should demonstrate that you have acquired the skills needed to perform dissertation-quality research. You are expected to have performed new research of substantial strength and novelty since your area paper. Except in exceptional cases, this new research should be appropriate for inclusion in the dissertation.

The thesis proposal should demonstrate that you have the technical strength needed to do PhD-quality research, and the vision to see the “big picture” into which that research fits.

Furthermore, the thesis proposal should show that you not only know how to solve problems, but also how to frame the issues.

Finally, the thesis proposal should demonstrate that you have developed strong and insightful intuitions as to which research themes are promising. The thesis proposal defense serves to verify these points.

In short, the proposal, talk, and exam should demonstrate to the dissertation advisory committee that an entire dissertation is indeed likely to result within a reasonable time frame.

A successful thesis proposal is not a guaranteed formula for producing a successful dissertation. As the research progresses, the research goals may change dynamically, and some initial goals may be too hard to be solved within the time frame.

We therefore expect that the dissertation project will evolve to meet these contingencies, and that this evolution will be the primary topic of six-month reviews.

Scheduling the Thesis Proposal Defense

Once sufficient feedback on the thesis proposal has been gathered, you can schedule the Thesis Proposal Defense. This is best done early in the spring of the third year, though it can be done earlier, and must be done before the spring PAS.

When you are ready to schedule the thesis proposal defense, see the graduate program secretary to reserve a room and date, and to complete a Thesis Proposal Defense Appointment Form.

The graduate program secretary will not schedule more than two events in the same day—one in the morning and one in the afternoon—to ensure the availability of interested faculty members. Students should try to schedule events well in advance to make sure they meet the spring PAS deadline.

Defending the Thesis Proposal

A public presentation is a required part of the thesis proposal defense. It is a chance for you to publicly present your ideas to the community and for your committee to judge both the ideas and the presentation.

The presentation should take no more than an hour, and should concentrate on the proposed research and the current year’s research progress.

You should provide the department secretary with the date, time, place, and abstract of the talk at least ten days in advance. She will then advertise the talk to the faculty, staff, and students.

The actual exam, which will normally occur immediately following the public presentation, is a meeting of the dissertation advisory committee and the student. Other faculty may attend and freely question and comment.

The purpose of the exam is for the committee—now that it has read the thesis proposal and heard the public talk—to ask you further questions and give you feedback. Questions may address any aspect of the proposal, including the actual research, the larger problem, your familiarity with previous work, and your expected attack on specific sub-problems. In addition to direct feedback, the committee will also report to the PAS.

Acceleration

You may choose to attempt the third-year process in your second year. You will be expected to do so if you passed the area process during your first year. There are no delayed requirements in this case; accelerating simply amounts to completing the third-year hurdles one year early.

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Top 10 Computer Science Project ProposalTemplates with Samples and Examples

Top 10 Computer Science Project ProposalTemplates with Samples and Examples

Devesh Sharma

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Project Proposals and computer science are intimately related. Both are structured, scientific fields of study that feed into each other for efficient, wonderful, and profitable execution. 

Every business requires a proposal that is apt, brief, and catchy to grab the attention of the clientele. When clients get information related to a project in a single space, it allows them to make quick and effective decisions. The same holds true for computer science project proposals as well. 

However, creating a computer science project proposal from scratch is easier said than done. What’s really some work is tailoring project proposals to companies. But, there is a better solution that you can try. 

SlideTeam’s ready to use and 100% editable computer science project proposal templates are here for you. Using these presentation templates, you can ensure that your project proposal gets accepted as well as offers all the required information to the user. 

So, let’s proceed and have a look at these 100% editable and customizable templates right away. 

If you are looking for some engineering project proposal templates then this blog may be of great help. 

Template 1: Cover Letter for Computer Science Project Proposals

When it comes to a project proposal, its cover letter is one of the most prominent and supporting elements. Using this cover letter, you can offer initial insight to the client(s) about the proposal. Consider your client is that looking for a web application development team for the development of a nutrition based app, then you can inform that your company has over ten years of experience in this domain and, is hence, making a case. For any queries, the client can then connect with you. Download this template to know what you can add further in the cover letter. 

Computer Science Project Proposal

Download The Template

Template 2: Context and Objectives for Computer Science Project Proposals 

This template offers some context and objectives for the initial information of the clients. Here, you can offer context to the clients; as in a brief statement that this project proposal is related to web application development. Under the objectives section, you can showcase your statement of action and delivery stating that you promise to deliver an app that can help health practitioners to generate meal plans for individual patients. Feel free to download this template from below and check out the rest of the content to be included in this presentation template. 

Context and Objectives for Computer Science Project Proposal

Template 3: Scope of Work for Computer Science Project Proposals

Now that the cover letter is showcased, you can now inform clients about the project scope. In this template, you can represent the in-scope and out of scope attributes of the proposal. The in-scope items can showcase that the app will be developed in such a way that all the practitioners and patients can use it feasible. You can also inform stakeholders about deadlines and commitments will be met by your team as required. Download this template today and learn more about attributes that you can showcase.

Scope of Work for Computer Science Project Proposal

Template 4: Addressing Web Application Development Process for Computer Science Project Proposals

Web application development process is a mandatory part of this Computer Science Project Proposal template. In this template, you can showcase that the process of app development is divided into five phases or processes named Requirements Process, Planning Process, Prototyping, Development Process, and last, Release and Evolution Process. The requirements process enlightens the client that your team will first analyze the requirements and gather data. Down the line, you will plan resource requirements for the project and line up other details. Download this template to learn more about other phases of the process. 

Addressing Web Application Development Process for Computer Science Project Proposal

Template 5: Implementation Timeline for Computer Science Project Proposals

Once the process is lined up, it's time to describe in detail, when and how the project will proceed. This is the next stage of the web application development process and showcases the day-wise distribution of tasks and milestones. This is a table-based template that shows who will be responsible for tasks and milestones. The columns of the table represent the days whereas the rows represent the tasks and personnel involved. Download this template to check out the representation of the tasks and days. 

Implementation Timeline for Computer Science Project Proposal

Download The Template  

Template 6: Work Breakdown Structure for Computer Science Project Proposals

This template showcases exact details related to the processes in the project, along with the task name. In the template, you can showcase tasks involved in the web application development process. Across the tasks, you can pen down the duration of the tasks along with the start and end dates. The tasks related to the process include project management, data gathering, establishing approach, development of the app, its testing and more. Download this template right away and see for yourself what this template has to offer.

Work Breakdown Structure for Computer Science Project Proposal

Template 7: Your Investment for Computer Science Project Proposals

Any project proposal, especially one related to computer science is incomplete without investment details. Hence, this part of the PPT showcases investments required for individual tasks of the web application development process. The investment is listed in numbers across the list of tasks. For the better understanding of the client, the duration and cost per day for any task is also represented. Below the table, you can list subtotals to that stage of the project. Download this template using the button below to get a visual gist of the representation. 

Your Investment for Computer Science Project Proposal

Template 8: Company Overview for Computer Science Project Proposals

Here's another template for you in this project proposal template. This slide allows you to showcase the overview of the company in the form of Vision, Mission, and Achievements. Under the Our Mission section, you can promise the client that your company is highly motivated and dedicated to offer on-time and quality services without any exceptions. Similarly, the Our Mission statement should target long-term goals for your company. You can download the template from the button below to learn what to include in Our Achievements section. 

Company Overview for Computer Science Project Proposal

Template 9: Terms and Conditions for Computer Science Project Proposals

Terms and Conditions are one of the most crucial parts of any kind of proposal. These define the what and what not for business and the client and so does this template. This template is divided into two sections named Service and Payment & Cancellation and Modifications. The service and payment section states that the payment for the project should be completed in two parts wherein the first installment of 60% of the total amount is to be made beforehand and the rest is to be settled after the delivery of the product. Next, you can download the template and check the information to include under Cancellation and Modifications. 

Terms & Conditions for Computer Science Project Proposal

Template 10: Sign Off for Computer Science Project Proposals 

Your client may consider your project proposal after evaluating the offered information. If he is willing to accept the proposal, then you can take the help of this template to get the project signed off. The slide offers a space to enter the name of the client as well as your business acknowledging the acceptance to the terms and conditions from both parties. The next section also offers similar spaces stating that both parties are willing to proceed in the way described in the proposal. At the end, both parties can sign the document and date it for acceptance. 

Sign-off for Computer Science Project Proposal

GREAT, USEFUL INFO  WHEN YOU NEED IT

Everyone loves it when they get the required information in brief and in an attractive format. Hence, the computer science project proposal templates provided above can be of great help to your business. The adaptability of the templates makes it highly modifiable and the color-coded format is helpful. These templates become the optimal choice to gather the required attention from your clients and stand out of the competition with grace. 

Feel free to check out some other science project proposals in the blog provided here. 

PS For some exciting must-have software project proposals, you can explore the guide provided here.

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Sipan Ye M.Sc. Thesis Proposal Supervisor: Dr. Yuanzhu Chen

Inducing social interaction through co-location using radio beacons

Department of Computer Science Thursday, February 23, 2017, 2:00 p.m., Room EN 2022

The ability in analyzing and predicting human social structures and behaviors is essential in sociology and anthropology. Originally, scientists have conducted research by manually observing people’s daily activities, movements, and communication [27]. This is laborious and error-prone. More and more scientists generate their researches through these approaches, like GPS-based data model [8] [17]. However, these methods are not a perfect representation of people’s behaviours and activities on stability and convenience, such as people they met, locations they visited, and the amount of time they stayed in a place. These data are important for activities of humans in reality [9]. In our research, we want to improve the data performance and provide a more efficient approach for inducing social interaction. We plan to invite volunteers fitted with Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) transmitters. In addition, we will also allocate some transmitters in fixed locations to help us gather more specific location data. We propose a contact network model to provide social interaction of people based on these data.

Keywords: Bluetooth, iBeacon, Social Network, Contact Network.

Ali M.S. Alfosool M.Sc. Thesis Proposal Supervisor: Dr. Yuanzhu Chen

Geographical Mobile Social Network: Local Community Integration and Analysis

Department of Computer Science Thursday, February 23, 2017, 2:20 p.m., Room EN 2022

Non-profit organizations are vital to having a better life within a community we live in today. However, many communities have long suffered the absence of quality in the services (if at all) provided. This may partially be due to lack of allocated funding and the recent budget cuts; but it is also an indirect result of today’s lifestyles. Social networks and smartphones are now, more than ever, important parts of most people’s lives. We aim to combine the advantages of the two and integrate a geographical and mobile based social network within a local community and to analyze the network’s pattern. Although, there has been some previous work on geosocial networking (such as Brightkite), they have mainly focused through a business perspective to increase potential profit. Additionally, most of these businesses aim to attract members from all around the world and do not generate a fully local-based network. We are interested to study how people, in a local community-based social network, are connected and interact with one another with respect to time and their location. Our analysis will evaluate the network’s evolution over time which helps to determine specific characteristics of the locally-formed network. Additionally, Closeness, Betweenness and PageRank centralities of individuals can be measured to analyze members’ communication and friendship network as well as most in-fluential members of the community. Our work is based on collaborating with a local non-profit organization (East Coast Trail Association) and involves developing a mobile application that takes advantage of an array of locally developed services. Such as outdoor fitness activity tracking, offline trail mapping, and local geo-based social networking. This application addresses many free services that the community has longed-for, yet attracting more members and support for the local non-profit organization. In addition to safety, health, and geo-based social connection services provided by this app, the data collected (with users’ permission) from these services such as social, physical and geographical patterns, will be most beneficial to this research for further community pattern and statistical analysis.

Faramarz Dorani M.Sc. Thesis Proposal Supervisor: Dr. Ting Hu

Detecting gene-gene interactions in Colorectal cancer using data mining and machine learning approaches

Department of Computer Science Thursday, February 23, 2017, 2:40 p.m., Room EN 2022

The fundamental task of genome-wide association studies is to detect genetic variations that are   mainly contributing to the disease state. To achieve this purpose, many research areas have been explored and machine learning methods have gained the most interests. On the other hand, colorectal cancer is a common cause of cancer deaths in developed countries and especially it has a high incidence rate in the newfoundland and Labrador province. Therefore, finding the affecting genetic factors can help better understand the disease in order to better treat and prevent the disease. In this thesis, we will investigate a few powerful machine learning algorithms on the colorectal cancer genetic data which have been collected from subjects in Newfoundland and Labrador. Random forests (RF) and logistic regression will be applied to the data to detect the underlying gene-gene interactions and the correlation of genetic variants with the disease. To overcome the challenge of high dimensionality in this big genomic dataset, we will investigate several feature selection methods to reduce the number of features in the dataset. Afterwards, the results of our analysis will be biologically validated to extract new knowledge in the understanding of the disease in order to better diagnose, treat and predict the disease.

Keywords : machine learning, gene-gene interactions, colorectal cancer, feature selection.

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Early in Michaelmas Term you need to submit a project proposal that describes what you plan to do and how you plan to evaluate it. In order to help with this process, you are assigned two Project Checkers, who, together with your Supervisor and Director of Studies, will provide advice on your ideas. The deadline for project proposals is a little over one week into term, and is a hard deadline .

Choosing a project

You have a great deal of freedom in the selection of a project, and should start narrowing down the possibilities by identifying starting points or ideas that appeal to you. These initial ideas should be refined to a coherent project plan, which is then submitted as the project proposal. The proposal will be discussed informally with your Project Checkers, but is then submitted to the Head of the Department as a formal statement of intent.

The main sources of inspiration are commonly:

  • Ideas proposed by candidates.
  • Suggestions made by Supervisors or Directors of Studies.
  • The project suggestions on the projects web page .
  • Past years’ projects. Most recent dissertations are available to read online ,
  • Proposals put forward by industry, especially companies who have provided vacation employment for students.

When ideas are first suggested or discussed it is good to keep an open mind about them—a topic that initially seems very interesting may prove unreasonable on further consideration, perhaps because it will be too difficult. Equally, many ideas on topics that are unfamiliar to you will need study before you can appreciate what would be involved in following them. Almost all project suggestions should also be seen as starting points rather than fully worked out proposals.

Notes on project choice

Some project ideas can be discarded very quickly as inappropriate. It is almost always best to abandon a doubtful idea early on rather than to struggle to find a slant that will allow the Project Checkers to accept it. Projects are expected to have a significant Computer Science content; for example, writing an application program or game-playing program, where the main intellectual effort relates to the area supported rather than to the computation, are not suitable. Projects must also be about the right size to fit into the time available. The implications of this will best be judged by looking at past years’ projects and by discussing plans with a Supervisor or Project Checker. They should not allow you to waste much time considering either ideas that would prove too slight or ones that are grossly overambitious.

It is important to pick a project that has an achievable core and room for extension. You should pick a suitably challenging project, where you will likely have to learn new things in order to successfully complete it. In addition, it is expected that you will make use of existing libraries and tools (i.e. don’t reinvent the wheel) unless there is a good reason for producing your own implementation.

Re-use of projects that have been attempted in the past

Projects are intended to give you a chance to display your abilities as a computer scientist. You are not required (or indeed expected) to conduct research or produce radically new results. It is thus perfectly proper to carry out a project that has been attempted before, and it is commonplace to have two students in the same year both basing their projects on the same original idea.

In such cases it is not acceptable to run a simple action replay of a previous piece of work. Fortunately all projects of the required scale provide considerable scope for different approaches; producing a new variation on an existing theme will not be hard. Furthermore the report produced at the end of a previous attempt at a project will often identify areas that led to unexpected difficulties, or opportunities for new developments—both these provide good scope for putting a fresh slant on the ideas involved.

Supervision

In some cases the most critical problem will be finding a suitable project Supervisor, somebody whom you will see regularly to report your progress and obtain guidance about project work throughout the year. This might be one of your main course Supervisors or a separate, specialist project Supervisor, but it should not be assumed that a person suggesting a project will be willing to supervise it. Supervisors have to be appointed by your Director of Studies, but in most cases it will be left up to you to identify somebody willing and able to take on the task. The Project Checkers will be interested only in seeing that someone competent has agreed to supervise the project, and that your Director of Studies is content with that arrangement.

Each project will have a number of critical resources associated with its completion. If even one of these fails to materialise then it will not be possible to proceed with a project based on the idea; your Director of Studies can help you judge what might be a limiting issue.

The project proposal must contain as its last section a Resources Declaration. This must explicitly list the resources needed and give contact details for any person (apart from yourself) responsible for ensuring their availability. In particular, you should name the person responsible for you if your work requires access to the Department research area. The signatures of these people should also be present on the project cover sheet before submission.

What qualifies as a critical resource?

In some cases a project may need to use data or build on algorithms described in a technical report or other document known to exist but not immediately available in Cambridge. In this case, this must be considered critical even if work could start without the report or data.

Using any hardware or software other than that available through a normal student account on UIS equipment (e.g. MCS) is considered non-standard. This includes personal machines, other workstations (e.g. research machines in the Department), FPGA boards, or even Raspberry Pis if they belong to someone else. Likewise, use of software written or owned by someone else that is not freely available as open-source will be considered as non-standard and should be declared.

Additional MCS Resources

It is reasonable to suppose that disk space and machine time will be made available in amounts adequate for all but extreme projects. Those who consider they may need more should provide a reasoned estimate of the resources required in the project proposal in consultation with the Supervisor. Additional file space should be requested through a web form , noting that:

  • you should state in your application that you are Part II CST;
  • requests for small increases of MCS space will need a very brief justification: please don't send your proposal;
  • requests for substantial increases should also be accompanied by a brief supporting email to [email protected] from your Supervisor.

Note that some MATLAB toolkits are not available on the MCS but might be available on Department accounts.

Use of your own computer

If you are using your own computer, please state its specifications and also state your contingency plan in case it should fail (such as using MCS or another personal computer). Please also state your file backup plan and the revision control system you plan to use. If using your own computer please include the following text in your declaration:

I accept full responsibility for this machine and I have made contingency plans to protect myself against hardware and/or software failure.

Department Accounts

Access to Departmental computers can be granted if there is a good reason, e.g. 

  • collaboration with a particular research group; 
  • use of software not available on the MCS facility. 

If you plan to use a Department account then state this and explain why it is needed in your resources declaration. If relevant, the signature of a sponsoring member of the department (e.g. the owner of the specific resource) is required as an extra signature on the project cover sheet. In addition, your Supervisor should send an email to [email protected] requesting the account with a brief justification. 

Some Department resources and the people who can authorise their use: 

  • Requests for resources involving a Department research machine should be authorised by a Lecturer, Reader or Professor who is in charge of managing the equipment. 

Access to the Department can be granted if there is a good reason. If you require access to the secure part of the William Gates Building, you should state who will be responsible for you whilst you are on the premises. They should sign your Project Proposal Coversheet as a Special Resource Sponsor. 

Third-Party Resources

Resources provided by your College, other University departments or industrial collaborators must be declared. The name and contact details (including email address) of the person in charge of the resource must be stated and their signature must be present on the project cover sheet. Resources from third parties can sometimes disappear unexpectedly, so please state why you believe this is not going to happen or else state your contingency plan in case it does.

In the case of projects that rely on support from outside the University it will be necessary to procure a letter from the sponsors that confirms both that their equipment will remain available right up to the end of the academic year and that they understand that the results of work done by students cannot be viewed as secret or proprietary.

You should bear in mind that the Examiners will require electronic submission of your dissertation and code. Therefore, you should not sign anything, such as a non-disclosure agreement, that would prevent you from submitting them.

Working with human participants

If your project involves collection of data via surveys, interviews or online, release of instrumented software, fieldwork, or experiments with human participants, such as usability trials or asking people to evaluate some aspect of your work, then you must seek approval by submitting a human participants request to the departmental Ethics Committee and record that you are going to do this, by ticking the appropriate box on your cover sheet.  This must occur before any of these activities start. Please read the Department's ethics policy .

Your project Supervisor will help you to fill in an online form ( read-only version ) containing two questions:

  • A brief description of the study you plan to do;
  • The precautions you will take to avoid any risk.

Simple guidance related to the most common types of study is available on the School of Technology Research Guidance site .  You may also find it useful to discuss your plans with the person supervising you for the Part II HCI course.

After submitting the ethics review form, you will receive feedback from the Ethics Committee within a few days. You must not start any study involving human participants without approval from the Ethics Committee.

Planning the project

As part of the project proposal, you should provide a detailed description of the work that needs to be performed, broken down into manageable chunks.  You will need to identify the key components that will go to make up your final product.  Credit is awarded specifically for showing a professional approach using any relevant management or software engineering methods at all stages of project design, development and testing. Plan an order in which you intend to implement the project components, arranging that both the list of tasks and the implementation order provide you with a sequence of points in the project where you can assess progress. Without a set of milestones it is difficult to pace your work so that the project as a whole gets completed on time.

When you have decomposed your entire project into sub-tasks you can try to identify which of these sub-tasks are going to be hard and which easy, and hence estimate the relative amounts of effort involved in each. These estimates, together with the known date when the dissertation must be submitted, should allow you to prepare a rough timetable for the work. The timetable should clearly make allowance for lecture loads, unit-of-assessment coursework, vacations, revision and writing your dissertation. Looking at the details of such a plan can give you insight into the feasibility of the project.  Ideally you should plan to start writing the dissertation at least six weeks before the submission date.

Languages and tools

It will also be necessary to make decisions about operating systems, programming languages, tools and libraries. In many cases there will be nothing to decide, in that the essence of the project forces issues. However, where you do have a choice, then take care to balance out the pros and cons of each option.  It is expected that students will be prepared to learn a new language or operating system if that is a natural consequence of the project they select.

Uncommon languages or ones where the implementation is of unknown reliability are not ruled out, but must be treated with care and (if at all possible) fall-back arrangements must be made in case insuperable problems are encountered.

Risk management

Projects are planned at the start of the year, and consequently it can be hard to predict the results of decisions that are made; thus any project proposal involves a degree of risk. Controlling and managing that risk is one of the skills involved in bringing a project to a successful conclusion. It is clear where to start: you should identify the main problem areas early and either allow extra margins of time for coping with them or plan the project so that there are alternative ways of solving key problems. A good example of this latter approach arises if a complete project requires a solution to a sub-problem X and a good solution to X would involve some complicated coding. Then a fall-back position where the project can be completed using a naive (possibly seriously inefficient, but nevertheless workable) solution to X can guard against the risk of you being unable to complete and debug the complicated code within the time limits.

Planning the write-up

As well as balancing your risks, you should also try to plan your work so that writing it up will be easy and will lead to a dissertation in which you can display breadth as well as depth in your understanding. This often goes hand-in-hand with a project structure which is clearly split into sub-tasks, which is, of course, also what you wanted in order that your management of your work on the project could be effective.

A good dissertation will be built around a varied portfolio of code samples, example output, tables of results and other evidence of the project’s successful completion. Planning this evidence right from the start and adjusting the project specification to make documenting it easier can save you a lot of agony later on.

Preparing the Project Proposal and consulting Project Checkers

You should keep in touch with both your Project Checkers from the briefing session until the final draft of your project proposal, making sure that they know what state your planning is in and that they have had a chance to read and comment on your ideas. Project Checkers will generally be reluctant to turn down a project outright, but if you feel that yours sound particularly luke-warm about some particular idea or aspect of what you propose you would do well to think hard (and discuss the issues with your Supervisor) before proceeding. If Project Checkers declare a project plan to be unacceptable, or suggest that they will only accept subject to certain conditions, rapid rearrangement of plans may be called for.

Dealings with your Project Checkers divide into three phases between the briefing session and submitting your proposal. Most of the communications will be best arranged by Moodle comments in the feedback box and all submissions of work are on Moodle.  Please be sure to take note of the various deadlines .

Phase 1 report: Selecting a topic

You start by preparing a Phase 1 report which, for 23/24 must be submitted on or before the first day of Michaelmas Full Term in October  Please pay careful attention to the points raised in the briefing lectures regarding selection of an appropriate topic. You must certainly choose something that has a defined and achievable success criterion. Note also that the marking scheme explicitly mentions preparation and evaluation, so please select something that will require a corresponding initial research/study phase and a corresponding (preferably systematic) evaluation phase.

You should complete a copy of the “Phase 1 Project Selection Status Report” and upload it to Moodle .

Phase 2: Full proposal draft: Filling out details

The details will include:

  • Writing a description, running to a few hundred words.
  • Devising a timetable, dividing the project into about 10 work packages each taking about a fortnight of your effort. The first couple of these might be preparatory work and the last three writing your dissertation, with the practical work in the middle. These should be identifiable deliverables and deadlines leading to submission of your dissertation at the beginning of the Easter Term. You will probably write your progress report as part of the fifth work package.
  • Determining special resources and checking their availability.
  • Securing the services of a suitable Supervisor.

Send all this to your Project Checkers and ask them to check the details. 

Phase 3: Final proposal

In the light of your Project Checkers’ comments, produce a final copy in PDF format. 

You do not secure signatures from your Project Checkers at this stage. Simply submit the proposal. 

Shortly after submission the Project Checkers will check your proposal again and, assuming that the foregoing steps have been followed carefully, all should be well and they will sign the proposal to signify formal acceptance. If the proposal is not acceptable you will be summoned for an interview.

Submission and Content of the Project Proposal

Completed project proposals must be submitted via Moodle by noon on the relevant day.

Format of the proposal

A project proposal is expected to up to 1000 words long. It consists of the following:

  • A standard cover sheet
  • The body of the proposal (see below).

When emailing drafts of your proposal to Project Checkers, please make sure they contain all of the information required on the final cover sheet.

The body of the proposal should incorporate:

  • An introduction and description of the work to be undertaken.
  • A statement of the starting point.
  • Description of the substance and structure of the project: key concepts, major work items, their relations and relative importance, data structures and algorithms.
  • A criterion that can later be used to determine whether the project has been a success.
  • Plan of work, specifying a timetable and milestones.
  • Resource declaration.

Introduction and description

This text will expand on the title quoted for your project by giving further explanation both of the background to the work you propose to do and of the objectives you expect to achieve. Quite often a project title will do little more than identify a broad area within which you will work: the accompanying description must elaborate on this, giving details of specific goals to be achieved and precise characterisations of the methods that will be used in the process. You should identify the main sub-tasks that make up your complete project and outline the algorithms or techniques to be adopted in completing them. A project description should give criteria that can be used at the end of the year to test whether you have achieved your goals, and should back this up by explaining what form of evidence to this effect you expect to be able to include in your dissertation.

Starting point

A statement of the starting point must be present to ensure that all candidates are judged on the same basis. It should record any significant bodies of code or other material that will form a basis for your project and which exist at project proposal time. Provided a proper declaration is made here, it is in order to build your final project on work you started perhaps even a year earlier, or to create parts of your programs by modifying existing ones written by somebody else. Clearly the larger the input to your project from such sources the more precise and detailed you will have to be in reporting just what baseline you will be starting from. The Examiners will want this section to be such that they can judge all candidates on the basis of that part of work done between project proposal time and the time when dissertations are submitted. The starting point should describe the state of existing software at the point you write your proposal (so work that you may have performed over the summer vacation is counted as preparatory work).

Success criterion

Similarly, a proposal must specify what it means for the project to be a success. It is unacceptable to say “I’ll just keep writing code in this general area and what I deliver is what you get”. It is advisable to choose a reasonably modest, but verifiable, success criterion which you are as certain as possible can be met; this means that your dissertation can claim your project not only satisfies the success criterion but potentially exceeds it. Projects that do not satisfy the success criterion are, as in real life, liable to be seen as failures to some extent.

You will need to describe how your project is split up into two- or three-week chunks of work and milestones, as explained in the planning section .

Resource declaration

You should list resources required, as described in the resources section .

Failure to submit a project proposal on time

Any student who fails to submit a project proposal on time is in breach of a Regulation and will no longer be regarded as a Candidate for Part II of the Computer Science Tripos. The Chairman of Examiners will write to the appropriate Senior Tutor as follows:

Dear Senior Tutor,

XXX has failed to submit a project proposal for Part II of the Computer Science Tripos.  The Head of Department was therefore unable to approve the title by the deadline specified in Regulation 17 for the Computer Science Tripos [Ordinances 2005, p268,amended by Notices (Reporter, 2010-11, pp.94 and 352, http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/so/2011/chapter04-section9.html#heading2-43 )].  XXX is therefore in breach of the regulation and is thus no longer eligible to be a Candidate for Part II of the Computer Science Tripos.  Please could you take appropriate action. I am copying this  letter to the Secretary of the Applications Committee of the Council.

Yours sincerely,

------------------------- Chair of the Examiners Department of Computer Science and Technology William Gates Building JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge, CB3 0FD

Department of Computer Science and Technology University of Cambridge William Gates Building 15 JJ Thomson Avenue Cambridge CB3 0FD

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Research Topics & Ideas: CompSci & IT

50+ Computer Science Research Topic Ideas To Fast-Track Your Project

IT & Computer Science Research Topics

Finding and choosing a strong research topic is the critical first step when it comes to crafting a high-quality dissertation, thesis or research project. If you’ve landed on this post, chances are you’re looking for a computer science-related research topic , but aren’t sure where to start. Here, we’ll explore a variety of CompSci & IT-related research ideas and topic thought-starters, including algorithms, AI, networking, database systems, UX, information security and software engineering.

NB – This is just the start…

The topic ideation and evaluation process has multiple steps . In this post, we’ll kickstart the process by sharing some research topic ideas within the CompSci domain. This is the starting point, but to develop a well-defined research topic, you’ll need to identify a clear and convincing research gap , along with a well-justified plan of action to fill that gap.

If you’re new to the oftentimes perplexing world of research, or if this is your first time undertaking a formal academic research project, be sure to check out our free dissertation mini-course. In it, we cover the process of writing a dissertation or thesis from start to end. Be sure to also sign up for our free webinar that explores how to find a high-quality research topic. 

Overview: CompSci Research Topics

  • Algorithms & data structures
  • Artificial intelligence ( AI )
  • Computer networking
  • Database systems
  • Human-computer interaction
  • Information security (IS)
  • Software engineering
  • Examples of CompSci dissertation & theses

Topics/Ideas: Algorithms & Data Structures

  • An analysis of neural network algorithms’ accuracy for processing consumer purchase patterns
  • A systematic review of the impact of graph algorithms on data analysis and discovery in social media network analysis
  • An evaluation of machine learning algorithms used for recommender systems in streaming services
  • A review of approximation algorithm approaches for solving NP-hard problems
  • An analysis of parallel algorithms for high-performance computing of genomic data
  • The influence of data structures on optimal algorithm design and performance in Fintech
  • A Survey of algorithms applied in internet of things (IoT) systems in supply-chain management
  • A comparison of streaming algorithm performance for the detection of elephant flows
  • A systematic review and evaluation of machine learning algorithms used in facial pattern recognition
  • Exploring the performance of a decision tree-based approach for optimizing stock purchase decisions
  • Assessing the importance of complete and representative training datasets in Agricultural machine learning based decision making.
  • A Comparison of Deep learning algorithms performance for structured and unstructured datasets with “rare cases”
  • A systematic review of noise reduction best practices for machine learning algorithms in geoinformatics.
  • Exploring the feasibility of applying information theory to feature extraction in retail datasets.
  • Assessing the use case of neural network algorithms for image analysis in biodiversity assessment

Topics & Ideas: Artificial Intelligence (AI)

  • Applying deep learning algorithms for speech recognition in speech-impaired children
  • A review of the impact of artificial intelligence on decision-making processes in stock valuation
  • An evaluation of reinforcement learning algorithms used in the production of video games
  • An exploration of key developments in natural language processing and how they impacted the evolution of Chabots.
  • An analysis of the ethical and social implications of artificial intelligence-based automated marking
  • The influence of large-scale GIS datasets on artificial intelligence and machine learning developments
  • An examination of the use of artificial intelligence in orthopaedic surgery
  • The impact of explainable artificial intelligence (XAI) on transparency and trust in supply chain management
  • An evaluation of the role of artificial intelligence in financial forecasting and risk management in cryptocurrency
  • A meta-analysis of deep learning algorithm performance in predicting and cyber attacks in schools

Research topic idea mega list

Topics & Ideas: Networking

  • An analysis of the impact of 5G technology on internet penetration in rural Tanzania
  • Assessing the role of software-defined networking (SDN) in modern cloud-based computing
  • A critical analysis of network security and privacy concerns associated with Industry 4.0 investment in healthcare.
  • Exploring the influence of cloud computing on security risks in fintech.
  • An examination of the use of network function virtualization (NFV) in telecom networks in Southern America
  • Assessing the impact of edge computing on network architecture and design in IoT-based manufacturing
  • An evaluation of the challenges and opportunities in 6G wireless network adoption
  • The role of network congestion control algorithms in improving network performance on streaming platforms
  • An analysis of network coding-based approaches for data security
  • Assessing the impact of network topology on network performance and reliability in IoT-based workspaces

Free Webinar: How To Find A Dissertation Research Topic

Topics & Ideas: Database Systems

  • An analysis of big data management systems and technologies used in B2B marketing
  • The impact of NoSQL databases on data management and analysis in smart cities
  • An evaluation of the security and privacy concerns of cloud-based databases in financial organisations
  • Exploring the role of data warehousing and business intelligence in global consultancies
  • An analysis of the use of graph databases for data modelling and analysis in recommendation systems
  • The influence of the Internet of Things (IoT) on database design and management in the retail grocery industry
  • An examination of the challenges and opportunities of distributed databases in supply chain management
  • Assessing the impact of data compression algorithms on database performance and scalability in cloud computing
  • An evaluation of the use of in-memory databases for real-time data processing in patient monitoring
  • Comparing the effects of database tuning and optimization approaches in improving database performance and efficiency in omnichannel retailing

Topics & Ideas: Human-Computer Interaction

  • An analysis of the impact of mobile technology on human-computer interaction prevalence in adolescent men
  • An exploration of how artificial intelligence is changing human-computer interaction patterns in children
  • An evaluation of the usability and accessibility of web-based systems for CRM in the fast fashion retail sector
  • Assessing the influence of virtual and augmented reality on consumer purchasing patterns
  • An examination of the use of gesture-based interfaces in architecture
  • Exploring the impact of ease of use in wearable technology on geriatric user
  • Evaluating the ramifications of gamification in the Metaverse
  • A systematic review of user experience (UX) design advances associated with Augmented Reality
  • A comparison of natural language processing algorithms automation of customer response Comparing end-user perceptions of natural language processing algorithms for automated customer response
  • Analysing the impact of voice-based interfaces on purchase practices in the fast food industry

Research Topic Kickstarter - Need Help Finding A Research Topic?

Topics & Ideas: Information Security

  • A bibliometric review of current trends in cryptography for secure communication
  • An analysis of secure multi-party computation protocols and their applications in cloud-based computing
  • An investigation of the security of blockchain technology in patient health record tracking
  • A comparative study of symmetric and asymmetric encryption algorithms for instant text messaging
  • A systematic review of secure data storage solutions used for cloud computing in the fintech industry
  • An analysis of intrusion detection and prevention systems used in the healthcare sector
  • Assessing security best practices for IoT devices in political offices
  • An investigation into the role social media played in shifting regulations related to privacy and the protection of personal data
  • A comparative study of digital signature schemes adoption in property transfers
  • An assessment of the security of secure wireless communication systems used in tertiary institutions

Topics & Ideas: Software Engineering

  • A study of agile software development methodologies and their impact on project success in pharmacology
  • Investigating the impacts of software refactoring techniques and tools in blockchain-based developments
  • A study of the impact of DevOps practices on software development and delivery in the healthcare sector
  • An analysis of software architecture patterns and their impact on the maintainability and scalability of cloud-based offerings
  • A study of the impact of artificial intelligence and machine learning on software engineering practices in the education sector
  • An investigation of software testing techniques and methodologies for subscription-based offerings
  • A review of software security practices and techniques for protecting against phishing attacks from social media
  • An analysis of the impact of cloud computing on the rate of software development and deployment in the manufacturing sector
  • Exploring the impact of software development outsourcing on project success in multinational contexts
  • An investigation into the effect of poor software documentation on app success in the retail sector

CompSci & IT Dissertations/Theses

While the ideas we’ve presented above are a decent starting point for finding a CompSci-related research topic, they are fairly generic and non-specific. So, it helps to look at actual dissertations and theses to see how this all comes together.

Below, we’ve included a selection of research projects from various CompSci-related degree programs to help refine your thinking. These are actual dissertations and theses, written as part of Master’s and PhD-level programs, so they can provide some useful insight as to what a research topic looks like in practice.

  • An array-based optimization framework for query processing and data analytics (Chen, 2021)
  • Dynamic Object Partitioning and replication for cooperative cache (Asad, 2021)
  • Embedding constructural documentation in unit tests (Nassif, 2019)
  • PLASA | Programming Language for Synchronous Agents (Kilaru, 2019)
  • Healthcare Data Authentication using Deep Neural Network (Sekar, 2020)
  • Virtual Reality System for Planetary Surface Visualization and Analysis (Quach, 2019)
  • Artificial neural networks to predict share prices on the Johannesburg stock exchange (Pyon, 2021)
  • Predicting household poverty with machine learning methods: the case of Malawi (Chinyama, 2022)
  • Investigating user experience and bias mitigation of the multi-modal retrieval of historical data (Singh, 2021)
  • Detection of HTTPS malware traffic without decryption (Nyathi, 2022)
  • Redefining privacy: case study of smart health applications (Al-Zyoud, 2019)
  • A state-based approach to context modeling and computing (Yue, 2019)
  • A Novel Cooperative Intrusion Detection System for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (Solomon, 2019)
  • HRSB-Tree for Spatio-Temporal Aggregates over Moving Regions (Paduri, 2019)

Looking at these titles, you can probably pick up that the research topics here are quite specific and narrowly-focused , compared to the generic ones presented earlier. This is an important thing to keep in mind as you develop your own research topic. That is to say, to create a top-notch research topic, you must be precise and target a specific context with specific variables of interest . In other words, you need to identify a clear, well-justified research gap.

Fast-Track Your Research Topic

If you’re still feeling a bit unsure about how to find a research topic for your Computer Science dissertation or research project, check out our Topic Kickstarter service.

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Research topics and ideas about data science and big data analytics

Investigating the impacts of software refactoring techniques and tools in blockchain-based developments.

Steps on getting this project topic

Joseph

I want to work with this topic, am requesting materials to guide.

Yadessa Dugassa

Information Technology -MSc program

Andrew Itodo

It’s really interesting but how can I have access to the materials to guide me through my work?

Sorie A. Turay

That’s my problem also.

kumar

Investigating the impacts of software refactoring techniques and tools in blockchain-based developments is in my favour. May i get the proper material about that ?

BEATRICE OSAMEGBE

BLOCKCHAIN TECHNOLOGY

Nanbon Temasgen

I NEED TOPIC

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15 Free Research Proposal PowerPoint Templates for Scientific Project, Thesis Defence

Are you a scientist who wishes to create a research proposal presentation in the best manner? If you do, then this excellent list of Research Proposal PowerPoint Templates is truly a demand!

The research proposal is a document that a researcher needs to write, It outlines the details of a research project and gives team members or readers a summary of the information in a project.

In order to allow readers to understand the project information more clearly, a research proposal presentation will be a better way to present the information of a research project.

A research proposal PPT should include the following:

  • Research title or topic: make sure your title can clearly describe the research project, or supplement your research project with a short statement.
  • Research background: why do this research project
  • literature review: describe research progress on your research topic, and the gap or remaining questions need to research.
  • Research aim, objective, and hypothesis
  • Research method: explain how to conduct your research, how data is collected and analyzed.
  • Results: the results you expect.
  • Question: provides an overview of the problems encountered during the research process, and how to solve them.
  • Summary: make sure the reader has a complete understanding of your research project.

Note: this PDF file made by Australian National University provides more information about the research proposal presentation.

In this collection, you’ll find numerous and diverse styles of research proposals ppt templates that you can pick as part of your inspiration.

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Table of Contents

Free research proposal powerpoint templates, premium research proposal powerpoint templates, 1. rea thesis presentation template.

Rea – Free Thesis Defense PPTGoogle Slides Presentation Template

You can create a professional research proposal with Rea in a matter of minutes. Why? Because you don’t need any design knowledge or sophisticated design software like Photoshop or Adobe Illustrator, the Rea ppt template gives you everything you need to create a research proposal, it provides a complete pre-built slide set. What you need to do is focus on your study.

To assist you in presenting your research proposal in a structured way, the Rea template divides your research proposal into seven sections: introduction, literature review, research, results, discussion, conclusion, reference list. The majority of research proposals can follow this structure.

The Rea ppt template features a modern, creative design, the alternation of light slides and dark slides will attract the viewer’s attention well.

Unique slides: 33

2. Master Thesis Defense PowerPoint Template

Master Thesis Defense PowerPoint Template

The Master Thesis Defense PowerPoint Template is a thesis PowerPoint presentation for students. It features a clean, sophisticated design, the unified layout allows you to easily adjust or add slides in your presentation. This template is perfect for a master’s thesis.

Unique slides: 21

3. Blue Graduation & Thesis Defense Presentation

Blue Graduation & Thesis Defense Presentation

This PPT template is made for thesis defense presentations, such as bachelors thesis, PhD thesis, masters thesis, or doctoral thesis. It comes with a blue background cover slide and a lot of useful infographic slides.

4. Red Dissertation proposal defense powerpoint presentation

Dissertation proposal defense powerpoint presentation

This research proposal PowerPoint template uses a striking red as the main color, features 21 editable slides. The table of contents slide and break slide will help you organize your content.

5. Green Dissertation defense presentation template

Dissertation defense presentation template

Green Dissertation defense presentation template comes with 21 unique slides and a clean layout, suited for chemistry thesis or biology thesis.

6. PhD Dissertation Defense Presentation Template

PhD Dissertation Defense Presentation Template - best Research Proposal PowerPoint Templates

PhD Dissertation Defense Presentation Template features a clean, minimal design. It’s well organized and easy to use. The only thing you need to focus on is your research.

7. Blue Medical research proposal powerpoint template

Blue Medical is a free multipurpose PowerPoint template for medical presentations.

Blue Medical is a free multipurpose PowerPoint template for medical presentations. This template is also perfect for medical research proposals, chemical project research proposals.

Unique slides: 41

8. Master’s Thesis Defense PowerPoint Template

Master’s Thesis Defense Free PowerPoint Template is one of the best research proposal templates.

Master’s Thesis Defense Free PowerPoint Template is one of the best research proposal templates. You don’t need to build anything from scratch, it’s more or less just a matter of dragging and dropping, editing text and charts.

Unique slides: 28

9. Research presentation Template

image 6

This PPT template is a simple alternative that helps you create a research slide. It includes 5 steps to guide you through the research process. If you want a simplest PowerPoint template, this will be the right one.

Unique slides: 9

10. Minerva Master Thesis Defense PowerPoint Template

Minerva Master Thesis Template Minimalist by Slidecore

Minerva is a free minimalist master’s thesis defense presentation template. It has 34 comprehensive and unique slides. Use this template to present your research now!

Unique slides: 34

11. Professional Thesis Project Proposal PowerPoint Template

Preview of Professional Thesis Project Proposal PowerPoint Templates

Professional Thesis Project Proposal PowerPoint Template is a free research paper ppt template. It comes with 21 easy-to-use slides that include every aspect of your thesis, from the purpose of your study to method, data analysis, results, and discussion.

12. Thesis Presentation Powerpoint & Google Slides Template

Preview of Thesis Presentation Powerpoint & Google Slides Template

This presentation template is one of the best free research proposal ppt templates that help you stand out. It features 20 pre-built research slides with modern, minimal layouts.

13. The effects of technology learning Research Presentation Template

the effects of technology learning

This cool presentation template is designed for students to present their school projects. It includes many illustrations and graphs.

14. Free Thesis Defense Presentation Template

Free Thesis Defense Presentation Template

This beautiful PPT template is for anyone who needs a quick but professional thesis defense template. Utilize professionally designed slides for your introduction, methodology, results, and conclusion. The template includes 22 animated slides.

15. Black and white Research Proposal Presentation Free download

Research Proposal Presentation Template for PowerPoint and Google Slides

A free research proposal presentation template for PowerPoint and Google Slides, contains 29 unique slides.

Thesis Science Powerpoint Template

Thesis Science Powerpoint Template

Thesis Science Powerpoint Template offers 20 unique slides. All slides have been organized and categorized to adhere to the guidelines stipulated by the thesis defense format.

SOLOZ – Dark Background Science Thesis Defense Powerpoint Template

SOLOZ - Science Thesis Defense Powerpoint

SOLOZ PPT template contains 30 unique slides with a dark background. The unified color scheme and master slides make it easy to customize and quickly build an impressive presentation.

Thesis Defense – Design Powerpoint Template

Thesis Defense - Design Powerpoint Template

This thesis defense PowerPoint template uses a design interior theme as a preview. It comes with 30 unique slides, dark and light backgrounds, and widescreen & standard ratio.

Research Proposal PPT Template

Research Proposal PPT Template

The Research Proposal PowerPoint Template offers over 50 slide designs with a modern and professional look. This template is available in three various formats: PowerPoint, Google Slides, and Keynote.

Thank you for visiting Just Free Slide and reading this article! We hope this article helped you find the best research proposal PowerPoint template.  We highly appreciate it! Now you might want to get more free PowerPoint templates . Below you’ll find more PowerPoint templates related to the research proposal:

  • 8 Best Academic PowerPoint Templates
  • 42 Pages Thesis Defense PowerPoint Presentation Template (Premium)

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Wonderful article! I have found an amazing site on Google it’s http://www.kridha.net . Here you can explore professionally designed fully customizable research templates which are easy to use.

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Home > Sciences > Computer Science > Presentations

Computer Science Presentations

Storytelling for Summarizing Collections in Web Archives by Yasmin AlNoamany, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

Storytelling for Summarizing Collections in Web Archives

Yasmin AlNoamany, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) Spring 2016 Membership Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, April 5, 2016. Also available on Slideshare .

Combining Heritrix and PhantomJS for Better Crawling of Pages with Javascript by Justin F. Brunelle, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

Combining Heritrix and PhantomJS for Better Crawling of Pages with Javascript

Justin F. Brunelle, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) 2016 Conference in Reykjavik, Iceland, April 11, 2016. Also available on Slideshare .

Why We Need Multiple Archives by Michael L. Nelson and Herbert Van de Sompel

Why We Need Multiple Archives

Michael L. Nelson and Herbert Van de Sompel

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) Spring 2016 Membership Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, April 3, 2016. Also available on Slideshare.

Evaluating the Temporal Coherence of Archived Pages by Scott G. Ainsworth, Michael L. Nelson, and Herbert Van de Sompel

Evaluating the Temporal Coherence of Archived Pages

Scott G. Ainsworth, Michael L. Nelson, and Herbert Van de Sompel

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) 2015 Conference at Stanford University, April 28, 2015. Also available on Slideshare .

Combining Storytelling and Web Archives by Yasmin AlNoamany, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

Combining Storytelling and Web Archives

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from an Old Dominion University Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) Department Colloquium, November 13, 2015. Also available on Slideshare .

Tools Managing Seed URls (Detecting Off-Topic Pages) by Yasmin AlNoamany, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

Tools Managing Seed URls (Detecting Off-Topic Pages)

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Columbia University Web Archiving Collaboration: New Tools and Models Conference, in New York, New York, June 4-5, 2015. Also available on Slideshare .

Tools for Managing the Past Web by Michele C. Weigle

Tools for Managing the Past Web

Michele C. Weigle

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from an Old Dominion University - ECE Department Seminar, February 20, 2015. Also available on Slideshare .

What's Grad School All About? by Michele C. Weigle

What's Grad School All About?

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Capital region Celebration of Women in Computing (CAPWIC) Conference in Harrisonburg, Virginia, February 27, 2015. Also available on Slideshare .

When Should I Make Preservation Copies of Myself? by Charles L. Cartledge and Michael L. Nelson

When Should I Make Preservation Copies of Myself?

Charles L. Cartledge and Michael L. Nelson

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL) 2014 in London, United Kingdom, September 9, 2014. Also available on Slideshare .

Assessing the Quality of Web Archives by Michael L. Nelson, Scott G. Ainsworth, Justin F. Brunelle, Mat Kelly, Hany SalahEldeen, and Michele C. Weigle

Assessing the Quality of Web Archives

Michael L. Nelson, Scott G. Ainsworth, Justin F. Brunelle, Mat Kelly, Hany SalahEldeen, and Michele C. Weigle

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the 2014 Digital Preservation Meeting, Washington D. C., July 22-23, 2014. Also available from Slideshare .

Profiling Web Archives by Michael L. Nelson, Ahmed Alsum, Michele C. Weigle, Herbert Van de Sompel, and David Rosenthal

Profiling Web Archives

Michael L. Nelson, Ahmed Alsum, Michele C. Weigle, Herbert Van de Sompel, and David Rosenthal

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the 2014 International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) General Assembly, Paris, France, May 21, 2014. Also available on Slideshare .

Strategies for Sensor Data Aggregation in Support of Emergency Response by X. Wang, A. Walden, M. Weigle, and S. Olariu

Strategies for Sensor Data Aggregation in Support of Emergency Response

X. Wang, A. Walden, M. Weigle, and S. Olariu

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Military Communications Conference (MILCOM), Baltimore, Maryland, October 7, 2014. Also available on Slideshare .

Bits of Research by Michele C. Weigle

Bits of Research

PDF of a powerpoint presentation that provides an overview of digital preservation, web archiving, and information visualization research; dated June 26, 2014. Also available on Slideshare .

Tools for Managing the Past Web by Michele C. Weigle, Michael L. Nelson, Yasmin AlNoamany, Ahmed Alsum, Justin Brunelle, Mat Kelly, and Hany SalahEldeen

Michele C. Weigle, Michael L. Nelson, Yasmin AlNoamany, Ahmed Alsum, Justin Brunelle, Mat Kelly, and Hany SalahEldeen

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Archive-It Partners Meeting in Montgomery, Alabama, November 18, 2014. Also available on Slideshare .

"Archive What I See Now" Bringing Institutional Web Archiving Tools to the Individual Researcher by Michele C. Weigle, Michael L. Nelson, and Liza Potts

"Archive What I See Now" Bringing Institutional Web Archiving Tools to the Individual Researcher

Michele C. Weigle, Michael L. Nelson, and Liza Potts

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the 2014 National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Office of Digital Humanities (ODH) Project Directors' Meeting in Washington D. C., September 15, 2014. Also available form Slideshare .

Who and What Links to the Internet Archive by Yasmin AlNoamany, Ahmed Alsum, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

Who and What Links to the Internet Archive

Yasmin AlNoamany, Ahmed Alsum, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from TPDL 2013: 17th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries, Valletta, Malta, September 22-26, 2013. Also available from Slideshare .

Profiling Web Archive Coverage for Top-Level Domain & Content Language by Ahmed AlSum, Michele C. Weigle, Michael L. Nelson, and Herbert Van de Sompel

Profiling Web Archive Coverage for Top-Level Domain & Content Language

Ahmed AlSum, Michele C. Weigle, Michael L. Nelson, and Herbert Van de Sompel

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from TPDL 2013: 17th International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries, Valletta, Malta, September 22-26, 2013. Also available on Slideshare .

Evaluating the SiteStory Transactional Web Archive with the ApacheBench Tool by Justin F. Brunelle, Michael L. Nelson, Lyudmila Balakireva, Robert Sanderson, and Herbert Van de Sampel

Evaluating the SiteStory Transactional Web Archive with the ApacheBench Tool

Justin F. Brunelle, Michael L. Nelson, Lyudmila Balakireva, Robert Sanderson, and Herbert Van de Sampel

On the Change in Archivability of Websites Over Time by Mat Kelly, Justin F. Brunelle, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

On the Change in Archivability of Websites Over Time

Mat Kelly, Justin F. Brunelle, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson

More Archives, More Better by Michael L. Nelson

More Archives, More Better

Michael L. Nelson

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) 2013 General Assembly in Ljubljana, Slovenia, April 23, 2013. Also available from Slideshare .

Old Dominion University Computer Science IIPC New Member by Michael L. Nelson

Old Dominion University Computer Science IIPC New Member

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) 2013 General Assembly in Ljubljana, Slovenia, April 22, 2013. Also available on Slideshare .

Who Will Archive the Archives? Thoughts About the Future of Web Archiving by Michael L. Nelson, Scott G. Ainsworth, Ahmed Alsum, Justin F. Brunelle, Mat Kelly, Hany SalahEldeen, Michele C. Weigle, Robert Sanderson, and Herbert Van de Sompel

Who Will Archive the Archives? Thoughts About the Future of Web Archiving

Michael L. Nelson, Scott G. Ainsworth, Ahmed Alsum, Justin F. Brunelle, Mat Kelly, Hany SalahEldeen, Michele C. Weigle, Robert Sanderson, and Herbert Van de Sompel

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Wolfram Data Summit 2013 in Washington D.C., September 5-6, 2013. Also available on Slideshare .

Resurrecting My Revolution: Using Social Link Neighborhood in Bringing Context to the Disappearing Web by Hany M. SalahEldeen and Michael L. Nelson

Resurrecting My Revolution: Using Social Link Neighborhood in Bringing Context to the Disappearing Web

Hany M. SalahEldeen and Michael L. Nelson

Telling Stories with Web Archives by Michele C. Weigle

Telling Stories with Web Archives

PDF of a powerpoint presentation from the Southeast Women in Computing Conference in Lake Guntersville State Park, Alabama, November 16, 2013. Also available on Slideshare .

Why Care About the Past? by Michael L. Nelson and Michele C. Weigle

Why Care About the Past?

Michael L. Nelson and Michele C. Weigle

A set of slides used in various presentations by the authors to show that replaying an experience via archived web pages is more compelling than reading a summary of the event. Also available on Slideshare .

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Computer Science Proposal

This document provides an introduction and overview of operating systems including their structure, types, functions, and objectives. It was created by 5 students as a micro-project. The document includes an acknowledgement, table of contents, sections on the functions and role of operating systems, types of operating systems, objectives of operating systems, and some popular operating systems. Read less

computer science research proposal presentation

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  • 1. OPERATING SYSTEM Stucture, Types, Functions & Objectives.
  • 2. A MICRO-PROJECT BY Serial No. Name Roll No. 1. SWAPNIL GAIKWAD Y-1216 2. RUSHIKESH GAWALE Y-1217 3. SHWETA GORE Y-1218 4. SAINATH HARDADE Y-1219 5. TANVI INGALE Y-1220
  • 3. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT We would like to express our special thanks of gratitude to our teacher Prof. Vidya Patil who gave us the golden opportunity to do this wonderful project on the topic, report on Stucture, Types, Functions & Objectives of operating system of computer. which also helped us in doing a lot of Research and we came to know about so many new things we are really thankful to them. Secondly we would also like to thank our friends who helped us a lot in finalizing this project within the limited time frame.
  • 4. TABLE OF CONTENTS FUNCTIO NS OF OS 03 Role of OS IN DEVICES 02 What is operating system? Introductio n of os 01 Why use an operating system ? What does operating system do?
  • 5. TABLE OF CONTENTS What are the types of operating sytem ? Types of os 04 Objectiv es of os 05 What’s the purpose to have an operating system ? Some popular os 06 What are some famous operating systems?
  • 6. OUR COMPANY Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun and the smallest one in the Solar System—it’s only a bit larger than the Moon. The planet’s name has nothing to do with the liquid metal
  • 7. WHAT ARE WE WORKING ON? Despite being red, it’s a cold place full of iron oxide dust MARS Yes, Saturn is the ringed planet. It’s a also gas giant SATURN It’s a gas giant and the biggest planet in the Solar System JUPITER It’s the closest planet to the Sun and the smallest MERCURY
  • 8. ABOUT THE PROJECT Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun and the smallest one in the Solar System—it’s only a bit larger than the Moon. The planet’s name has nothing to do with the liquid metal
  • 9. “This is a quote, words full of wisdom that someone important said and can make the reader get inspired.” —SOMEONE FAMOUS
  • 10. NOW Mercury is terribly hot—even hotter than Mercury—and its atmosphere is poisonous. It’s the second-brightest natural object in the night sky after the Moon
  • 11. FUTURE Jupiter is a gas giant, the biggest planet in the Solar System and the fourth-brightest object in the night sky. It’s named after the Roman god of the sky and lightning
  • 12. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun MERCURY Venus is the second planet from the Sun VENUS It’s a gas giant and the biggest planet JUPITER Saturn is the only planet with rings SATURN Despite being red, Mars is a cold place MARS It’s the farthest planet from the Sun NEPTUNE
  • 13. 01 NAME OF THE SECTION You can enter a subtitle here if you need it
  • 14. BUDGET To modify this graph, click on it, follow the link, change the data and paste the new graph here MERC URY VENU S $50,000,000 Social Media Social Media TV TV Shop Shop
  • 15. PROJECT GOALS It’s the closest planet to the Sun and the smallest one in the Solar System—it’s only a bit larger than the Moon It has a beautiful name and is the second planet from the Sun. It’s terribly hot, even hotter than Mercury MERCURY VENUS
  • 16. PREDICTED RESULTS To modify this graph, click on it, follow the link, change the data and paste the new graph here Expected income for 2020 $20,000,000 New employees next year 100
  • 17. The planet’s name has nothing to do with the liquid metal since it was named after the Roman messenger god, Mercury SNEAK PEEK
  • 18. PROJECT STAGES Despite being red, Mars is a very cold place MARS Saturn is a gas giant and the biggest planet SATURN It’s a gas giant and the biggest planet in the Solar System JUPITER It’s the closest planet to the Sun and the smallest MERCURY
  • 19. 4,498,300,0 00 Big numbers catch your audience’s attention
  • 20. TIMELINE Venus is the second planet from the Sun 2019 Mercury is the smallest planet 2017 Jupiter is a gas giant and the biggest planet 2020 Despite being red, Mars is a cold place 2018
  • 21. AWESOME WORDS
  • 22. THIS IS A TABLE MERCURY MARS JUPITER 2018 647 984 268 2019 752 546 875 2020 455 856 340
  • 23. THIS IS A MAP Mercury is the smallest planet 60% Venus has very high temperatures 78%
  • 24. OUR PARTNERS Venus is the second planet from the Sun VENUS Saturn is the only planet with rings SATURN It’s the farthest planet from the Sun NEPTUNE
  • 25. OUR TEAM You can talk about this person here RICHARD ROE You can talk about this person here JENNA DOE You can talk about this person here JOHN SMITH
  • 26. MOCKUP You can replace the image on the screen with your own work. Just delete this one, add yours and center it properly
  • 27. DON’T FORGET WHAT’S IMPORTANT ● Write your recommendations here ● Write your recommendations here ● Write your recommendations here ● Write your recommendations here ● Write your recommendations here ● Write your recommendations here ● Write your recommendations here
  • 28. CREDITS: This presentation template was created by Slidesgo, including icons by Flaticon, and infographics & images by Freepik THANKS! Do you have any questions? addyouremail@freepik. com +91 620 421 838 yourcompany.com Please keep this slide for attribution
  • 29. ALTERNATIVE RESOURCES
  • 30. RESOURCES VECTORS ● Flat artificial intelligence background ● Flat artificial intelligence background ● Flat artificial intelligence background PHOTOS ● Close-up of humans handshake with tech background ● Futuristic technology screen interface ● Group of people with laptops
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  • 34. Create your Story with our illustrated concepts. Choose the style you like the most, edit its colors, pick the background and layers you want to show and bring them to life with the animator panel! It will boost your presentation. Check out How it works. Pana Amico Bro Rafiki Cuate Storyset
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  • 48. Add the title here Text 1 Text 2 Text 3 Text 4 Text 5 Text 6 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 “Despite being red, Mars is actually a very cold place” “Mercury is closest planet to the Sun and the smallest” “Neptune is the farthest-known planet from the Sun” “Saturn is a gas giant and has several rings” “Venus is the second planet from the Sun and is terribly hot” Premium infographics
  • 49. “Mercury is closest planet to the Sun and the smallest” TITLE 1 75% “Mercury is closest planet to the Sun and the smallest” “Mercury is closest planet to the Sun and the smallest” “Mercury is closest planet to the Sun and the smallest” 75% Premium infographics
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PhD Student Shiwei Ding, Computer Science, to Present Dissertation Proposal

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computer science research proposal presentation

IMAGES

  1. Computer Science Project Proposal Report Sample Example Document

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  2. Computer Science Project Proposal

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  3. Phd Computer Science Research Proposal : Procedures for Student

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  4. Novel Thesis Proposal for Computer Science Students

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  5. Research Proposal.pdf

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  6. Computer Science Project Proposal Report Sample Example Document

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VIDEO

  1. AI and academic research (Amharic tutorial

  2. Environmental Science- Research Proposal Video

  3. Top 5 Projects For Final Year Computer Science Students #cseprojects #viralshorts #computerscience

  4. Research Methods Workshop on Reading Computer Science Research Papers

  5. ICS FSC Computer Science paper presentation 2019

  6. Surprising Bird Science at Home

COMMENTS

  1. CSSA Sample PhD proposals

    CSSA Sample PhD proposals. Purpose. Welcome to the on-line version of the UNC dissertation proposal collection. The purpose of this collection is to provide examples of proposals for those of you who are thinking of writing a proposal of your own. I hope that this on-line collection proves to be more difficult to misplace than the physical ...

  2. PDF SCIT-RPR: How to Prepare a Professional Presentation

    Our guideline captures most of the research directions in the computer sciences and IT. 1 Introduction According to the RESEARCH PROPOSAL REVIEW GUIDELINES1 provided by the University of Wollongong (UOW), the research proposal review (RPR) presentation should allow the RPR Panel Com-mittee to assess the candidate's capacity: •to clearly ...

  3. A Practical Guide to Writing Computer Science Research Proposals

    I have a fairly standard funding portfolio for a systems-oriented computer science researcher; roughly 80% of my funding comes from federally funded research grants, and in particular agencies ...

  4. PDF Research Methods in Computing: Writing a Research Proposal

    Writing a Research Proposal 1 KhurshidAhmad Professor of Computer Science Department of Computer Science, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. Presentation for Trinity CS post-grads, April 2011, Dublin Writing a Research Proposal A research proposal is similar in a number of ways to a project proposal; however, a research proposal addresses a ...

  5. Computer Science Proposal Google Slides & PPT template

    Premium Google Slides theme, PowerPoint template, and Canva presentation template. A slide deck whose overall look and feel is very techie is what you need to put forward a proposal for a computer science project. And that's what you'll get with this template. The details on the backgrounds are so enticing and the neon tone used for the ...

  6. Thesis Proposal

    PURPOSE. In the thesis proposal, the PhD or DES student lays out an intended course of research for the dissertation. By accepting the thesis proposal, the student's dissertation proposal committee agrees that the proposal is practicable and acceptable, that its plan and prospectus are satisfactory, and that the candidate is competent in the knowledge and techniques required, and formally ...

  7. PDF Masters Thesis/Project Proposal

    Oral Presentation Audience: CS faculty members who may not be acquainted with the topic. A 20 minute oral presentation of the proposal must be carefully organized and given to the members of the thesis/project committee and the invited public. During the proposal presentation, the student must answer committee member's questions on such areas as

  8. Thesis Proposal for PhD in Computer Science

    The candidate is responsible for sending the research proposal to the committee two weeks before the oral presentation. The PhD in Computer Science committee need not be the same as the Candidacy Examination committee, but it follows the same requirements. The oral presentation involves a 30-minute presentation by the candidate followed by an ...

  9. Thesis Proposal for PhD in Computer Science

    The chairperson of the Proposal Examination committee should be a member of the Computer Science faculty and can be the student's advisor. The Examination The oral presentation involves a 45-minute presentation by the candidate followed by a question-and-answer session. The oral presentation is open to the general public.

  10. PhD Thesis Proposal

    PhD Thesis Proposal. After passing the area process you must form a thesis committee and defend a thesis proposal. The proposal defense constitutes the 'Ph.D. qualifying exam' discussed in the University's Graduate Studies Bulletin and Regulations and Policies Concerning Graduate Studies. Students must perform research that is a ...

  11. Top 10 Computer Science Project Proposal Templates with ...

    Template 4: Addressing Web Application Development Process for Computer Science Project Proposals. Web application development process is a mandatory part of this Computer Science Project Proposal template. In this template, you can showcase that the process of app development is divided into five phases or processes named Requirements Process ...

  12. CS PHD Dissertation Proposal

    The purpose of the written proposal, given to members of the research committee at least two weeks prior to the presentation, is to show the student has sufficiently explored the literature of a significant research problem in computer science to be able to embark upon solving that problem. The written proposal should detail a proposed ...

  13. PPT PowerPoint Presentation

    Give seminars, presentations. Discuss outcomes, issues, research direction. Collaborate. Write parts of report, thesis along the way & collate. Motivating yourself Be honest, the research is important (maybe, more so is the degree). Be prepared to spend time (a lot of time) reading.

  14. PDF Department of Computer Science Research Proposal Template

    You must write your own research proposal. General Length: A research proposal approximately 2-4 pages in length is often suitable, depending on the area of research. Detail: The following outline may be used as a guide. Research topic/title* An initial working title should be provided and should describe the content and direction of your project.

  15. Thesis Proposal Presentations

    Sipan Ye. M.Sc. Thesis Proposal. Supervisor: Dr. Yuanzhu Chen. Inducing social interaction through co-location using radio beacons. Department of Computer Science. Thursday, February 23, 2017, 2:00 p.m., Room EN 2022. Abstract. The ability in analyzing and predicting human social structures and behaviors is essential in sociology and anthropology.

  16. Project proposal

    Department of Computer Science and Technology. William Gates Building. JJ Thomson Avenue. Cambridge, CB3 0FD. Early in Michaelmas Term you need to submit a project proposal that describes what you plan to do and how you plan to evaluate it. In order to help with this process, you are assigned two Project Checkers, who, together with your ...

  17. Presentations

    Cite sources, including all research, images, videos, statistics, quotes, tables, etc. Include links when possible to cited online research sources, images, and video; Use an introduction and conclusion slide; Strike a balance between the use of text and media; Include a final slide with contact information; For more ideas:

  18. Computer Science Research Topics (+ Free Webinar)

    Finding and choosing a strong research topic is the critical first step when it comes to crafting a high-quality dissertation, thesis or research project. If you've landed on this post, chances are you're looking for a computer science-related research topic, but aren't sure where to start.Here, we'll explore a variety of CompSci & IT-related research ideas and topic thought-starters ...

  19. 15 Free Research Proposal PowerPoint Templates for Scientific Project

    Research Proposal PPT Template. The Research Proposal PowerPoint Template offers over 50 slide designs with a modern and professional look. This template is available in three various formats: PowerPoint, Google Slides, and Keynote.

  20. Computer Science Presentations

    Combining Storytelling and Web Archives. 2015. Yasmin AlNoamany, Michele C. Weigle, and Michael L. Nelson. PDF of a powerpoint presentation from an Old Dominion University Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) Department Colloquium, November 13, 2015. Also available on Slideshare.

  21. Research Proposal For MS (CS) Thesis

    Research Proposal for MS (CS) Thesis - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. This research proposal document outlines a student's proposed 1-year MS thesis research on implementing an intrusion detection system for cloud-based systems using machine learning algorithms. The student proposes to implement a state-preserving extreme ...

  22. Computer Science Proposal

    Computer Science Proposal. Dec 9, 2022 • Download as PPTX, PDF •. 0 likes • 363 views. AI-enhanced description. S. swapnilgaikwad893053. This document provides an introduction and overview of operating systems including their structure, types, functions, and objectives. It was created by 5 students as a micro-project.

  23. Sample of Computer Science Project Proposal

    SAMPLE OF COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECT PROPOSAL - Free download as Powerpoint Presentation (.ppt / .pptx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or view presentation slides online. This document proposes developing an online web-based student grade point average calculator for Federal College of Agriculture. It notes issues with the current manual system, like errors, delays, and inaccessibility of ...

  24. PhD Student Shiwei Ding, Computer Science, to Present Dissertation Proposal

    PhD student Shiwei Ding, Department of Computer Science, will present his dissertation proposal on Thursday, June 20, 2024, at 8 am in Rekhi 101 and via Zoom. The title of Ding's proposal is, "Efficient and privacy-guaranteed training/testing for Deep Neural Networks." Ding is advised by Professor Zhenlin Wang, Computer Science, and Adjunct Professor Xiaoyong (Brian) . . .