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31 Best Assignment Extension Excuses

Best Assignment Extension Excuses

Students need extensions on their assignments all the time. There are good excuses for an extension … and there are not so good excuses. I’m a professor, and I’ve heard them all. So has your professor. Here are the best ones I’ve heard.

The Best Assignment Extension Excuses

Introduction.

>>>BONUS: GET YOUR FREE ASSIGNMENT EXTENSION REQUEST LETTER TEMPLATE

Reasons to ask for an extension

For the rest of this article, I’m going to explain exactly how to ask your professor for an extension – with a focus on just 9 extension excuses.

Some of these are good excuses for turning in a paper late. Others are ones you’ll want to avoid.

Read on to learn which ones to avoid and which to use!

Professors like myself get a lot of extension requests, so knowing how to ask in a way that will get your teacher to grant the extension is very important.

>>>Related Article: 15+ Tips on Requesting an Extension

1. Your Team Members screwed you Over in a Group Assessment

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This extension excuse gets a lot of sympathies.

A little secret: teachers hate group work assignments , too. We usually set them because we have to embed it into a degree as an ‘employability skill’.

So, when you come to your teacher 3 days before submission and say “Teacher, one of my teammates didn’t pull through!”, your teacher will roll their eyes, but totally understand.

What you need to make this excuse work is a paper trail showing evidence that you pulled your weight. Evidence can be:

  • Email and Facebook chains of conversations;
  • Meeting minutes;
  • Completed drafts of sections that you were assigned

If you can show that you’ve put in the effort and genuinely tried to be a good team member, chances are your teacher will want to help you out.

Just beware: you still might lose points for teamwork. It’s an unfortunate reality that sometimes our team members bring our work down and we can’t do anything about it.

But, if you can show you’re a good student and have worked in good faith, this one might just help you pull through and win you that precious extra few days to work on your piece.

2. You’ve had Writer’s Block

>>> Related Post: How to Write an Essay at the Last Minute

This extension excuse gets points for honesty. If you come to your teacher and say “Look, I’ve read all of the readings, but the creativity just hasn’t come” then your teacher might just give you a little extra time.

This reason for asking for an extension on a paper will probably be respected more than most.

Teachers hate when a student comes to them with an obvious lie like:

  • Your dog ate your homework,
  • Your grandma died (again), or
  • your boss is a jerk

These are time-tested lies that we get all the time . It’s rarer for a student to step up and confess: “Look, it’s just a really tough assessment.”

For this excuse to work, it’s best to provide evidence of three things:

  • You’ve tried really hard;
  • You’ve sought help;
  • You’ve come up with a solution so it won’t happen again.

First, show you actually have put hours into the assessment.

Bring to your teacher (either in person or via email) evidence that you’ve read through a lot of readings on the topic.

Bring to the printed readings with highlighting and notes in the margins.

Talk to them about how you thought you might be able to use the information in these pieces for your work.

Second, show that you’ve sought help.

This excuse works best if you’ve primed the teacher already with a few emails spaced out over the previous few weeks asking questions about whether you’re on the right track.

If you’ve already managed to email the teacher a few times about the assignment, send your extension request as your final reply to that email chain of discussion.

Another way of showing that you’ve sought help is showing that you’ve accessed help from the library or another member of the university staff.

Explain to your teacher that you attended a library workshop , talked to your academic advisor, or had ongoing conversations with a Teacher’s Assistant about the assessment.

Third, show how you’ve developed skills to make sure this doesn’t happen again.

Explain to your teacher that you’ve thought up some study solutions that you’ll put in place during the week or so in which the extension would take place.

For example, you could note how some study skills you’ve thought might help you out of this situation might be:

  • You’ve found a spot in the library to dig in and do the work;
  • You’ve freed up some time in your calendar over the next 7 days;
  • You’ve found a study tip that you want to put in place

Make sure you not only tell, but show your teacher you’ve tried hard, you’ve sought help, and you’ve identified solutions. If you do this, you’re more likely to have your extension request granted.

3. Work called you in for Extra Shifts

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Here’s another reason to ask your professor for an extension on a paper that gets a lot of sympathies.

We teachers have been there. Poor, living off microwaved noodle. In fact, many of us are still there with you.

When explaining that work has called you in for extra shifts, make sure your teacher knows you needed that money. You don’t need to cry poor or ask for a sympathy card. But let them know:

  • My boss asked me to take on extra shifts; and
  • I pay my own way through life, so the extra money meant a lot to me.

This extension excuse strategy works best when you give advance notice. Let your teacher know as soon as you pick up those extra shifts. Send them an email making them feel like they were a part of the discussion ( Click here to download all my Assignment Extension Request Letter Templates ).

You can say:

Hi [Teacher] ,

My boss has just gotten in touch asking me to cover some extra shifts at work for the rest of this week. I’m pretty short on money at this point of the semester with a few bills coming through, so I’d love to be able to take them.

Obviously this gets in the way of the time I’ve set aside this week for completing the upcoming assignment.

I’m wondering, would you please consider giving me an extra three days to submit my assessment so that I can pick up these shifts? It’d mean a lot to me.

Thank you for considering this request.

Sincerely, [Your name] [Your class]

4. You’re taking a pre-planned Vacation

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This reason for asking for an extension on a paper needs to be flagged very early on.

I’ve granted extensions for this extension excuse, but usually only when students let me know in the first week or two of the semester.

The trick here is to show:

  • That the vacation was booked well in advance and was not intended to interfere with the course;
  • That you really want to complete the course this semester in order to meet a personal goal.

Your personal goal might be to have graduated by a certain date, before your child starts (or finishes) school, or in order to qualify for an internship in a Master’s program that has an application deadline of a specific date.

If you show you’re ambitious and taking your studies seriously, this excuse will go down well.

Teachers don’t always grant this one, so be prepared to be told that your extension is not granted. Your teacher might insist that you submit it before you head off on your vacation, or simply deny the extension.

Something else you need to take into account is that you’re admitting you might miss some classes as well.

It might be worthwhile pointing out that your intention is to complete the weekly readings or tasks in advance of heading off on vacation.

One time when I don’t grant extensions for pre-planned vacations is when the vacation clashes with group work assessments. Your chances are higher if your vacation isn’t putting anyone else out.

Good luck with this one!

5. Computer Issues

This extension excuse gets eye rolls.

Blaming technology issues is a cliché excuse that teachers tend not to take too seriously.

It’s used too often and we expect that more often than not it’s a lie rather than a genuine problem.

If you want to get sympathy for this excuse, provide evidence. Here are some valuable forms of evidence, in order from best to worst:

  • A receipt or quote from a computer repairman that contains the current date;
  • Evidence you’ve been to see the university’s IT department to see if your data can be recovered;
  • A photograph of the broken computer equipment.

Your teacher may even expect you to provide a backup of earlier drafts. It’s a good idea to get into the habit of saving your assignments onto a personal internet cloud like Google OneDrive. Personally, I email drafts to myself to ensure I have regularly saved versions.

You should also expect that your teacher will inform you that the university computers are there, available for you to use.

It’s a good idea to get ahead of this response by letting your teacher know you’ve set aside some time to use the university computers to get back on track.

6. You’re a Carer

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Something that has blown me away as a university teacher is just how many students care for their chronically sick or disabled parents, partners or children.

Carers are, frankly, inspiring people, and you’ll get sympathy from your teacher.

I’d recommend letting your teacher know in advance about your situation.

The best way to do this is to ask your student advisor or the course leader to give your teacher a heads-up on this one. Most universities these days assign student advisors to each student for support on issues like this.

Most universities also have a course leader who takes care of a specific degree program or major. If you know who this is, get in touch with them asap and let them know your situation.

Ask them to let your teachers know that you’re a carer which may mean you need special consideration.

Contact the teacher personally towards the start of the semester. Talk to them in person after the first class, or if you’re a distance learner, send them an email early on.

These early emails help to prime your teacher for when you ask for an extension.

If you haven’t informed the teacher of the situation, I’d recommend talking to them in person as soon as possible, telling them what your situation is, and asking for some additional time on your assessment.

As always, some form of evidence of your situation is really helpful. Doctors, social workers, or other support networks should be able to write a letter for you that you can pass on to your teacher.

There are two illnesses that I hear about the most. It’s either your child who’s been sick or you who’s been sick. Let’s take them in order:

1. Your Child’s Sick.

The ‘My Child’s been Sick’ excuse is one that I get a lot, but also one that I usually find believable.

One reason it’s so believable is that often five or six of my students who are parents will come to me explaining that an illness is going around the school.

It’s also an excuse that is easy to sympathize with. Children take up a lot of time, and with many of my students being single parents, I understand that children come first.

This is one that crops up late, but as usual, try to ask for an extension at least 72 hours (3 days) prior to the submission deadline.

A letter from a doctor goes a long way here but is not always necessary. If you can’t get a letter from a doctor, copy in some evidence that your child has taken the last few days off school. Attach a copy of your sick note to the school when you email your university professor .

2. You’re Sick.

If it’s you who has been sick, a note from a doctor is usually expected. It also requires some advance warning. If you got sick 6 days before the due date, why did you only email your teacher on the day it was due?

If you didn’t give advance warning, it looks pretty bad.

Similarly, if you got sick 3 days before the due date, what have you already done? Shouldn’t you just have finishing touches to do with 3 days to go?

Therefore, when you contact the teacher, you should also attach your most recent draft. You need to say:

  • This is what I’ve done;
  • This is what I had planned to do in the next 7, 6, 5, 4, or 3 days before submission;
  • This is why I’m so sick that I can’t do it.

So remember, if you’ve been sick, the two key things to include are:

  • A doctor’s note to prove it’s true;
  • Your latest draft to show you’ve not left it to the last minute.
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8. There was a Death in the Family

This is the most common reason for extension requests. Let me be clear: every teacher is bamboozled that there seems to be a spike in the deaths of grandmas whenever assessments are due.

We’re skeptical about this one, to say the least.

If you’re going to use this extension excuse, evidence is a must. Teachers understand that this is a sensitive topic. I’ve accepted a range of evidence for this one, though. This includes:

  • Notice of death in the local newspaper;
  • A scan of the booklet of funeral proceedings;
  • A letter or receipt from a funeral home;
  • A copy of the flight to or from the funeral location.

This is obviously a very sensitive issue, and it’s pretty sad that people abuse this reason. Teachers don’t want to offend you: but they also need to know you’re not pulling the wool over their eyes.

Another worrisome point for this excuse is that often the death occurred a month or more before the assessment is due.

Be prepared for your teacher to say: okay, there was a death a month ago. What have you done in the month since the funeral on your work?

If you’re going to use this reason, explain how it’s caused hardship (failure to focus, busy making funeral arrangements, travel to funerals, etc.). You also must think about how you can provide clear evidence that this death did, in fact, happen.

Related: How to Ask a Professor for a Letter of Recommendation

9. You have a Learning Disability

If you have a learning disability, you need to tell your university in advance. There’s really no other way around this one.

Nearly every university these days has support plans for students with learning disabilities .

The most common one is dyslexia . This is the condition in which students struggle with accurate and speedy reading and spelling. It can make university really tough, but universities try to be accommodating for students with learning disabilities such as dyslexia.

Other common personal issues that can qualify for extensions include common migraines and issues with concentration.

Talk to a student advisor at the university about how to get a diagnosis if you think you’ve got a learning disability. Once you’ve received the diagnosis you’ll be able to get a support plan set up.

Support plans are usually sent straight to your teachers at the start of the semester. However, you should also make yourself known to your teacher at the start of the semester. There are additional benefits to this, including that your teacher will be careful not to ask you to read content out loud in class.

If you haven’t told your teacher already that you have a learning disability, but you still want an extension, you’ll need to get in touch as soon as possible.

Highlight how:

  • You have made every effort to ensure you got your work done on time;
  • Something has happened (did your migraines flare up recently?) that has prevented you from completing on time.

When you ask for the extension, include the support plan, diagnosis, or doctor’s note to increase your chances of receiving the extension that you requested.

Extensions are commonplace, but you need to state your case. We have provided an outline of exactly how to ask for the extension that you might want to consult if you think you qualify for an extension. This outline explains that you need to take some key steps, including the steps in the infographic below (plus some more!):

How to ask for an extension

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Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

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The Study Blog :

How to ask for an extension for your assignment [examples + template].

By Evans Jun 15 2021

Time management is one thing you should get better at within your academic life, particularly when it comes to assignments.   However, regardless of how much you plan your time or stay organized, things might get out of hand. Read the article below to find why and how to ask for an extension. It also provides examples of how to ask for an assignment extension for your reference.

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What is an Extension Deadline?

An extension deadline for your assignment is the additional time you should request from your supervisor or tutor to finish your task. Most projects have a specific due date, and you should complete them on time. However, there are times when you can fall behind for numerous reasons and can't stay on schedule. At this point, you should reach your instructor and request an extension.

You should request an extension immediately you realize you won't be in a position to meet your original deadline. The deadline might affect other parts of your project, like other team members' abilities to complete the work and the project's completion date. Requesting an extension can offer the supervisor more time to readjust your assignment's workflow and schedule. Some of the situations in which you might request a deadline extension include:

·          The assignment needs more research or work than expected

·          Your project's timeline did not put all factors into consideration

·          You're waiting for essential materials to complete your project

·          You had prioritized the completion of another task

·          You were unable to access the required equipment

·          You had an emergency that stopped you from finishing your assignment

How to Ask for Your Extension

To ask for your extension effectively, kindly do the following:

Determine Whether You Can Get the Extension

Whether it is possible to get an extension depends on your work's scope. While some projects have rigid schedules, it will not matter if you submit a couple of days later when it comes to other projects. Please make sure you understand the flexibility in the deadline and develop a plan for completing your work.

Ask for the Extension

Once you realize you will be behind the deadline, notify your lecturer immediately. Choose the most convenient contact method. You can call them, ask in person, or send an email. Some instructors are too busy to check their mail from time to time, making a text message or phone call a more effective method.

When contacting your instructor, show them that you care about your grades. You can start with a statement about your goal and then why you require the extension.

Determine How Long Your Extension Will Be

Your extension should give adequate time to complete your paper based on how long you have taken to work on it.

Consider your facilitator's personality when determining the duration of the extension to request. If the instructor is strict, leave it to them to decide the time to grant. If you can negotiate with them, you can ask them for a three-day extension and expect the professor to negotiate down. And if the professor is lenient, ask for a specific extension.

Provide Evidence

If you offer proof, your professor will be impressed with your preparedness and is more likely to grant you the extension. Some of the evidence lecturers accept include:

·          A doctor's letter

·          A letter from an employer

·          An email from a child's teacher

·          A receipt from your car or computer repair shop

·          Newspaper clippings

Adhere to Your New Deadline and Ensure It Does Not Happen Again

Analyze your work schedule, avoid procrastination and manage your time better in the future. If possible, scale back on some assignments.

Thank Your Tutor

Express your gratitude for the extension granted and apologize for the inconvenience caused.

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good reasons for assignment extension

Email Template for Requesting More Time to Complete Your Assignment

Feel free to adapt or use this email template to ask for an extension for your assignment

Dear (Title of your Professor, Dr. Mr. Ms., followed by their last name), My name is (name), and I'm a student in your (name) class. I'm writing you to ask if it might be possible to be granted additional time for the (name of assignment) due on (date). Regrettably, I'm behind with this assignment because (reason). I hope to complete this assignment by (date). I look forward to hearing from you about the same. Kind regards, (Your name and student ID number)       

Here are more examples:       

Dear Dr. Andrea,

I'm writing this email to request an extension on the deadline for the web application development assignment. I'm already done with coding, but the testing and debugging are taking more time than I expected. I have also discovered some errors that I'm working on.

I should submit the assignment on June 23, but I will appreciate it if you extend the due date to June 26.

Thank you for your consideration.

Warm regards,

Dear Professor John,

My name is Jackie, and I'm in your chemistry 101 class. Due to a family emergency, I will be traveling over the weekend without the research materials for the assignment due on Wednesday. Consequently, I would like to request an extension and submit my paper on Friday. In the attachment below is a draft that shows the progress I have made so far.

Many Thanks,

Dear Dr. Peterson,

My name is Jane Stephanie, and I'm in your literature class. My assignment is due on the same day as a presentation at my workplace. Do you provide extensions? If you do, I can submit the assignment on July 20 instead of July 16. I understand that late projects receive grade penalties, which I would like to avoid.

Many thanks,

Dear Professional Kellen,

My name is Ivy Johnson, and I'm in your 11 a.m. English class. From the syllabus, I can see that I should submit my assignment on August 13. Unfortunately, I have three other tasks due on that date for other classes.

Is it possible to get a three-day extension on the deadline and submit it on August 16 instead? If you do not grant extensions, can I get the assignment topic early to work on it in advance?

Warm Regards,

What to Do If You Do Not Get an Extension

Most lecturers understand that students are human beings with jobs and lives outside of class. And many instructors will approve any extension request. However, sometimes the professor might say no. Here is what to do should it happen.

If it is a few hours or days to your deadline, ensure you understand the late penalty and determine whether it is more practical to submit your assignment late or rush to meet your deadline. Ensure you deliver pure gold and don't plagiarize your work; it could result in poor grades.

If you had planned early, you have options. You can rearrange your schedule to make time to write your paper, ask your tutor for the paper topics before, or ask for an extension in another class. Alternatively, you can hire an expert writer from our urgent writing service to complete the assignment for you.

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good reasons for assignment extension

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Healed Education

Extension excuses 101: mastering the art of requesting more time.

Title: The Best Assignment Extension Excuses: How to Approach Requesting More TimeWe’ve all been there: the deadline for that important assignment is nearing, and the pressure is mounting. Sometimes life throws us a curveball, making it difficult to meet our academic commitments on time.

In those moments, knowing how to request an assignment extension can be a valuable skill. In this article, we’ll explore the best excuses for assignment extensions and guide you on how to approach your request in a respectful and effective manner.

The Best Assignment Extension Excuses

Good excuses for assignment extensions.

1. Travel: Unforeseen travel plans that clash with your assignment deadline can be a plausible excuse.

Be sure to provide evidence, such as flight tickets or hotel reservations, to support your request. 2.

Illness: Both personal health issues and unexpected illnesses within your immediate family can warrant an extension. A doctor’s note or medical records can serve as valid documentation.

3. Miscommunication: If you’ve encountered communication errors with your professor regarding assignment requirements or deadlines, this can be a legitimate reason for an extension.

Provide evidence, such as email correspondence, to demonstrate the miscommunication. 4.

Anxiety: Mental health concerns, such as anxiety, can significantly impact your ability to complete assignments on time. Seek support from your university’s counseling services and provide evidence of your efforts to manage your condition.

5. Death in the family: Dealing with the loss of a loved one is emotionally challenging, and it can hinder your academic progress.

Be prepared to provide evidence, such as obituary notices or funeral programs, to support your request.

Not-so-good excuses for assignment extensions

1. No excuse: Simply stating you have no reason for an extension is not a valid approach.

Honesty and clear communication are important when requesting an extension. 2.

Writer’s block: While writer’s block can be frustrating, it is not generally seen as a valid excuse for an extension. Instead, focus on strategies you’ve tried to overcome it, such as seeking help from academic support services or using study solutions.

3. Work: Taking on extra shifts or having a demanding job may be your responsibility, but it does not automatically warrant an assignment extension.

However, if you have received advance notice of additional work obligations that impact your ability to complete the task, discussing this with your professor may help. 4.

Wedding: Although weddings are joyous occasions, they are typically planned events. It is essential to prioritize your academic responsibilities and plan accordingly to avoid conflicts between your assignments and personal commitments.

5. Public transport: Delays or issues with public transportation may cause temporary difficulties, but they are not typically recognized as valid grounds for an assignment extension.

Being proactive and planning your commute can help mitigate unexpected transportation challenges. 6.

Computer issues: Technical difficulties can happen, but universities often have IT support and resources for such problems. Requesting an extension due to computer issues may require evidence, such as a repairman’s report or documentation of university system errors.

How to Ask for an Extension with Specific Excuses

Subtopics 2.1 to 2.9: (Each subtopic will follow a similar structure as Subtopic 1.1 and 1.2)

Conclusion:

By understanding the best excuses for assignment extensions and how to approach your request, you can navigate the academic landscape with confidence. Remember that honesty, evidence, and clear communication are key in accommodating unforeseen circumstances.

Empower yourself by utilizing university resources and support systems, and always prioritize your academic responsibilities. With these strategies in mind, you’ll be better equipped to handle assignment extensions when needed.

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How to Ask a Professor for an Extension + Example Emails

May 10, 2023

how to ask a professor for an extension

So, you want to learn how to ask a professor for an extension, but you’re afraid of sounding like a slacker, or of getting on your professor’s bad side. Luckily, we have some dos and don’ts that should cover your questions. The first one is simple: please do not, under any circumstances, use the example below as a template.

This Is Not How to Ask for an Extension on an Assignment

Dear Professor S.,

I’m so so sorry but I won’t be able to turn in the final assignment on time. There’s an issue going on in my dorm room and it’s really, truly and utterly gross (I won’t go into the details). I’ll make sure to get the assignment to you soon. Please know that I’m really bummed to be doing this, because your course really was my favorite course this semester.

While Charles wrote his email in earnest, he made multiple gaffes that only added more awkwardness to an already confusing request. (In fact, Charles forgot to phrase his request as a question!) Yet asking for extra time should not become an additional crisis on top of other stress. In this post, we’ll cover everything you need to know about how to ask for an extension on an assignment.

What’s Your Excuse?

Turning in an assignment late can cause anxiety for students. Many fear getting points docked or a lower final grade. Some view it as doing something “wrong” and end up feeling preemptively guilty or undeserving of the extra time. These anxious feelings can manifest in the request itself. (Just look at Charles’s overly effusive apology.) However, a lot of valid reasons for an extension exist. The first successful step in how to ask a professor for an extension requires clarifying your situation.

Let’s say you have a funeral to attend, you fall sick, or, as was Charles’s case, you discover a bedbug infestation. All of these reasons qualify as unexpected crises you couldn’t plan for. In urgent circumstances like these, professors tend to take an accommodating stance for last-minute requests. They have lives outside of academics too, and know how the real world can intervene.

Less urgent circumstances that require you to know how to ask for an extension might involve a conflict of deadlines in different classes, or a wedding to attend. To increase your chances, make your request as far ahead as possible, as soon as you learn of the conflict.

Professors may not accommodate every request, especially if the student simply procrastinated. But whatever your circumstances, do give your professor the real reason. Honesty always comes across as most genuine and requires fewer justifications. Plus, treating the situation in a mature manner will result in the professor responding in kind, and taking your request more seriously.

How to Ask for an Extension on an Assignment to Improve Your Work

A less typical, last-minute, yet non-urgent request can arise when students find they don’t understand how to accomplish the assignment. Similarly, they may find they aren’t satisfied with the quality or direction of their work. Asking for more time to improve your work can sound reasonable to a professor. The trick here involves specifying exactly why you need more time and what you wish to improve. Consider asking for suggestions as well before going forward. Most professors prefer grading a student’s best effort rather than a sloppy, punctual paper, and will be willing to help those who show enthusiasm for their subject.

Act Accordingly

With the various types of impediments and conflicts identified, let’s consider the best approaches for how to ask for an extension. If in doubt, and especially in an emergency, send an email. When emailing, include these three vital pieces of information:

1) Explain the situation you’re facing.

2) Suggest a specific alternative deadline. This date should be reasonable, both in terms of reorganizing your own schedule, and with respect to the teacher’s semester. Avoid an overly-optimistic deadline; you won’t impress your teacher if you’re forced to ask for an extended extension.

3) Ask about the teacher’s late policy, if you don’t know it already. If this information is included in the course syllabus, acknowledge the late policy in writing. Perhaps your teacher docks points regardless, in which case, you’ll want to know how many for each day the assignment is late. You may need to weigh your priorities, and decide which to sacrifice, promptness or quality.

How to Ask a Professor for an Extension During Office Hours

If you’re trying to juggle multiple courses’ assignments, or want an extension with more guidance, send a preliminary email asking to meet with your professor. Do email first, because waylaying your professor after class can stress everyone out. Once a meeting is scheduled, the face-to-face chat may prove more successful, simply because it’s harder to say no in person. This meeting also gives your professor a chance to put a face to a name, and will give you a chance to say something about what you’re working on. Extra guidance like new leads and library references may also speed up your progress.

Putting the How in How to Ask a Professor for an Extension

Let’s return to Charles’ email, and imagine how his professor might react. Reading about a “really, truly and utterly gross,” mystery situation doesn’t give the professor any idea of the student’s trouble, nor of how severe it is, or how long it will last. The professor has no incentive to act leniently, and no opportunity to sympathize. If anything, the vague description evokes confusion, pity, and doubt.

Imagine instead that Charles wrote, “I just discovered a bedbug infestation in my dorm room. According to pest control, I’ll need to spend the weekend bagging up my possessions before an exterminator arrives. Then I’ll have to find a different place to sleep and study for the coming week.” Here Charles goes into enough detail to delineate the situation. It becomes clear that a bedbug infestation is time consuming, as well as psychologically and physically taxing. Though unusual, Charles’ reason for wanting an extension now sounds perfectly legitimate.

You can avoid Charles’s main mistake by articulating your situation clearly and concisely. With a big emphasis on concisely. If you’re going to a funeral, you don’t need to convince your teacher that you loved your grandmother. If you’re sick, you don’t need to list your symptoms. A brief email saves your harried professor some time, and gives students practice in establishing their own personal boundaries. Overall, a brief email will sound professional and sincere.

Another must when learning how to ask a professor for an extension involves tone. The right register will come across as respectful and somewhat formal. Change phrases like “I’m really bummed” to “I regret.” Apologize, but don’t overdo it. One apology appropriately recognizes the inconvenience the professor may experience.

How to Ask a Professor for an Extension, Example 1

Now let’s take a look at Charles’ improved urgent request.

Dear Professor Sassin,

I’m Charles Yu, from your Modern Architecture seminar. I’m writing to let you know about a situation that’s come up. I just discovered a bedbug infestation in my dorm room. According to pest control, I’ll need to spend the weekend bagging up my possessions before an exterminator arrives. Then I’ll have to find a different place to sleep and study for the coming week.

Because of this, I’m afraid I won’t have time to work on the final assignment until next week. Would you consider a one-week extension, with a new deadline on May 25? If so, please let me know how this extension might affect my grade.

I apologize in advance for the inconvenience, and am open to other suggestions you may have.

Best regards,  

In his amended version, Charles makes it clear why his particular situation requires more time. He asks for (rather than dictates) an extension, and shows that he’s both concerned about his grade and happy to consider an alternative plan. The writing sounds polite, clear, and formal—a complete reversal from the previous chaotic and informal tone. Charles’s chances look good.

How to Ask a Professor for an Extension, Example 2

In the following example represents a less typical situation. Time is of the essence, but the situation itself cannot be called urgent.

Dear Professor Napier,

I’ve been hard at work on my research essay for your class, the English Romantic Novel. Initially, my plan involved comparing early Gothic novels, analyzing recurring motifs, and rooting them in British culture of the time. However, the more I’ve read, the more I’ve realized that my interest lies in the parodies of Gothic novels, particularly in the works of Wilde and Austen, and in the significance we might pull from the distortions they make.

I believe I could write a more compelling paper on this subject, but the deadline is fast approaching. I won’t have enough time to refocus the research and finish writing by Friday. Would you mind if I turned the paper in next Tuesday, October 3, instead? I understand that your late policy is strict. However, I think this new theme may inform my senior thesis, so I wonder if an exception can be made.

I’m happy to meet and discuss during your office hours tomorrow. Please let me know at your earliest convenience.

Tatiana Gorns

Here, Tatiana takes a risk. She knows her situation won’t seem urgent, but she appeals to her professor’s academic side. To do so, Tatiana must expand. The email is not concise, nor is it fluffy. Her investment in the assignment appears genuine. Furthermore, she explains the stakes, that this extension could positively affect her future course of study. This appeal will be hard for most professors to turn down.

How to ask for an extension – Additional Resources

If you’re looking for more advice on how to navigate the college work-life balance, how to better communicate, and other college know-how, you may find the following links to be of interest:

  • Communicating with Professors: Ten Practical Suggestions
  • What Does it Mean to Audit a Class in College?
  • Best Gap Year Programs – 2023
  • The College Transitions Dataverse
  • College Success

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Ask a Professor: How to Ask for an Extension on an assignment

good reasons for assignment extension

Assessing the Situation

Understand Your Professor's Policies

How to write a polite and professional email: After that, you'll understand How to Ask for an Extension on an assignment

Follow-Up and Be Prepared

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Effective communication with professors is a crucial skill that can greatly impact your academic journey, especially when it comes to requesting an extension on an assignment. Knowing how to ask for an extension in a clear and respectful manner is essential. In this article, we will explore the significance of effective communication when asking for an extension and discuss common reasons that may necessitate one. By approaching extension requests professionally and respectfully, you can increase the likelihood of receiving a positive response from your professor and maintain a healthy student-professor relationship.

As students, we may encounter various situations when we really need assignment help . That's when knowing how to ask for an extension becomes important. Unexpected personal emergencies, health issues, overlapping deadlines, or an increased workload can all be valid reasons. However, it is crucial to approach the request in a professional and respectful manner. By doing so, you demonstrate your commitment to your education and show respect for your professor's time and expectations.

It is important to understand that professors are not obligated to grant extension requests. They have their own regulations and considerations to keep in mind. Therefore, to improve your chances of receiving a favorable response, it is crucial to effectively articulate your request. Acknowledge the significance of the assignment, express understanding of the potential impact on your grades, and suggest a fair deadline for completion.

By mastering the art of effective communication and knowing how to ask for an extension professionally, you can navigate the process with confidence. Remember to be respectful, provide valid reasons, and propose realistic solutions. Through open and respectful communication, you can foster understanding and cooperation with your professors, ensuring a smoother academic experience.

Assessing the Situation:

When you are faced with the problem "How to Ask for an Extension on an Assignment" it is important to assess the situation carefully before contacting your professor. Here are some key steps to consider:

  • Evaluate the validity of your reasons for requesting an extension: Take an honest look at the reasons behind your request. Are they legitimate and reasonable? Ensure that you have valid grounds for needing additional time to complete the assignment.
  • Consider the assignment's requirements: Review the assignment guidelines and instructions carefully. Understand the scope, complexity, and time required to fulfill the task. Assess whether your initial estimation of the workload was accurate and if it aligns with the given timeframe.
  • Evaluate your workload: Reflect on your overall workload, including other assignments, exams, and commitments. Determine whether the combination of tasks makes it genuinely challenging to complete the assignment on time. Be mindful of the workload distribution and prioritize accordingly.
  • Take personal circumstances into account: Sometimes unforeseen personal circumstances can arise, such as illness, family emergencies, or unexpected events. Consider whether these circumstances significantly affect your ability to complete the assignment within the given timeframe. Ensure that your request is reasonable and supported by genuine circumstances.
  • Determine a realistic and justified timeline extension: Based on your evaluation of the above factors, determine a timeline extension that is realistic and justifiable. Consider the additional time required to produce quality work without compromising other academic responsibilities.

Remember that ask for an extension on an assignment should be a balanced decision made in case of real need and with proper justification. A careful assessment of the situation will allow you to address the professor with a well-founded and reasoned request, which will increase the likelihood of a positive response.

Plan Ahead:

Planning ahead is crucial to avoid the need for extensions and ensure a smooth completion of assignments. Here are some important steps to follow:

  • Be aware of assignment deadlines and schedule your work accordingly: Familiarize yourself with the deadlines for all your assignments. Create a calendar or use a planner to keep track of important dates. Break down the assignment into smaller tasks and allocate specific time slots for each task. By staying organized and proactive, you can effectively manage your time and reduce the chances of needing an extension.
  • Anticipate potential challenges and allocate extra time: Recognize that challenges may arise during the assignment process. It could be difficulties understanding the material, technical issues, or unexpected circumstances. Make room in your agenda for some extra time to take into consideration these possible obstacles. By doing this, you build a buffer that enables you to deal with unexpected events without requesting an extension.
  • Avoid leaving assignments until the last minute: Procrastination can lead to unnecessary stress and increase the likelihood of needing an extension. Start working on assignments as soon as they are assigned. Break them down into manageable chunks and work on them consistently over time. By avoiding last-minute rushes, you give yourself ample time to complete the assignment to the best of your ability.

By planning ahead, you take control of your assignments and reduce the need for extensions. Being aware of deadlines, anticipating challenges, and avoiding procrastination enable you to manage your workload effectively. Remember, effective time management is a valuable skill that not only helps you meet deadlines but also allows for a more balanced and less stressful academic experience.

Understand Your Professor's Policies:

Understanding your professor's policies regarding extensions is crucial when requesting additional time for an assignment. Here are some steps to help you navigate their policies effectively:

  • Check your instructor's syllabus or course policy for an understanding of how to ask for an extension on an assignment: Review the syllabus or any documents describing course policies provided by your instructor. Pay particular attention to any specific information regarding assignment due dates and extension requests. Understand your instructor's guidelines and expectations for extensions.
  • Take note of any specific instructions or guidelines provided: Your professor may have outlined specific procedures or requirements for requesting an extension.Any instructions given, such as whether you need to submit a formal request, the request's format, or any other supporting paperwork that may be needed, should be noted down. Respecting your professor's policies and committing to following the established procedures are demonstrated by following these directions.
  • Respect the professor's discretion in granting extensions: It's important to remember that the decision to grant an extension ultimately lies with your professor. Respect their authority and judgment when considering your request. Keep in mind that they may have multiple students requesting extensions and various factors to consider. Approach the request with professionalism and an understanding that the professor's decision is final.

By familiarizing yourself with your professor's policies and guidelines, you demonstrate your commitment to following their expectations. Respecting their discretion in granting extensions shows your understanding of the academic process and your willingness to comply with their decisions. Understanding the policies helps you navigate the extension request process smoothly and increases the likelihood of a positive outcome.

How to write a polite and professional email: After that, you'll understand How to Ask for an Extension on an assignment.

When requesting an extension from your professor, it is important to communicate your request in a polite and professional manner. Here are the key elements to include in your email:

  • Begin by extending a cordial and respectful greeting to the lecturer as appropriate: Use a formal salutation at the beginning of your email, like "Dear Professor [Last Name]" or "Hello Professor [Last Name]." A professional tone is established in your email by addressing them respectfully and using the correct title.
  • Clearly state the purpose of your email, mentioning the specific assignment and deadline: In the opening paragraph, clearly state the purpose of your email. Mention the specific assignment that you are requesting an extension for and include the original deadline.
  • Explain the reason for your extension request concisely, while being honest and transparent: In the following paragraph, concisely explain the reason behind your extension request. Be honest and transparent about your circumstances, whether they are personal, academic, or related to unforeseen events. Keep your explanation clear and to the point.
  • Express your understanding of the potential impact on your grades and the importance of the assignment: Acknowledge the potential impact that the extension may have on your grades. Demonstrate your understanding of the importance of the assignment and its role in your overall academic progress. This shows that you take your responsibilities seriously.
  • Propose a new deadline and provide a plausible explanation for the requested extension: Suggest a new deadline for the assignment that allows you sufficient time to complete it effectively. Provide a plausible explanation for why you need the extension, making sure it aligns with the reasons you mentioned earlier. Justify the new deadline based on the circumstances you are facing.
  • Provide a strategy describing how you'll finish the work in the extra time: Confide in your professor that you have a strategy in place to finish the work in the extra time. Describe the precise actions you'll take to assure both the quality of your work and a timely submission. This demonstrates your dedication and foresight.
  • Express gratitude for the professor's consideration and sign off respectfully: In the closing paragraph, express your gratitude for the professor's time and consideration of your request. Thank them for their understanding and mention how their support will assist you in meeting the assignment requirements. Sign off your email respectfully, using phrases such as "Thank you for your consideration" or "Best regards."

By crafting a polite and professional email, you demonstrate your respect for your professor and increase the chances of receiving a positive response. Remember to maintain a courteous tone throughout the email and ensure that your request is supported by valid reasons and a well-thought-out plan.

Follow-Up and Be Prepared:

After sending your extension request email to your professor, it's important to follow up and be prepared for the response. Here are some steps to take:

  • Be patient and allow time for the professor to respond to your email: Professors have busy schedules, so it's essential to be patient and give them time to review your request. Avoid sending multiple follow-up emails too soon. Respect their workload and wait for a reasonable amount of time before expecting a response.
  • You should be ready for both a favorable and unfavorable response: Even though you may be hoping for a favorable reaction, it's crucial to be ready in case it's not. You should mentally prepare yourself to accept your professor's decision politely since they might not always offer extensions. You will be better able to navigate potential solutions if you are psychologically prepared.
  • If you are granted an extension, make sure that you meet the new deadline and do your work at a high level, because you will not have another attempt "how to ask a professor for an extension": If your professor has granted your request for an extension, respect his or her decision by meeting the new deadline. Use the extra time wisely to complete the assignment to the best of your ability. Maintain the same level of dedication and perform to a high standard that reflects your commitment and appreciation for the extension.
  • If denied, accept the decision gracefully and consider alternative solutions: If your request for an extension is denied, accept the decision respectfully. Understand that professors may have various reasons for their decision, such as maintaining fairness or adhering to course policies. Instead of dwelling on the denial, focus on alternative solutions. Seek help from a tutor, utilize academic resources, or consider rearranging your priorities to ensure timely completion of the assignment.

Remember that the response to your extension request is ultimately up to your professor. By being patient, prepared for different outcomes, and flexible in finding alternatives, you display maturity and professionalism. Regardless of the response, maintain a positive attitude, and continue to work diligently on your academic responsibilities.

Conclusion:

Finally, effective communication and professional behavior are of paramount importance when wondering how to ask for an extension on an assignment. By planning ahead, understanding your instructor's policy, and approaching your request with respect, you increase your chances of receiving a positive response. However, it is important to remember that students should be responsible for their work and that extensions should only be used as a last resort.

Planning ahead and managing your time effectively can minimize the need for extensions. By familiarizing yourself with assignment deadlines, anticipating challenges, and avoiding procrastination, you can stay on track and complete your work within the given timeframe.

Understanding your professor's policies regarding extensions is crucial. By adhering to their guidelines and respecting their discretion, you demonstrate your commitment to the academic process and foster a positive student-professor relationship.

While extensions may be necessary under certain circumstances, it is important to approach them as a last resort. Taking responsibility for your assignments, seeking help when needed, and prioritizing your workload can help prevent the need for extensions.

Remember, effective communication, planning, and responsibility are key to navigating the process of requesting an extension. By demonstrating professionalism and respect, you not only increase the chances of a favorable response but also develop valuable skills that will serve you well throughout your academic and professional journey.

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how to ask for an extension

Communicating with your professor when you need more time.

Maybe you started out the semester with the best of intentions, planning to stay on top of all of your work. But here you are, a month in, and you've got a week full of projects due and no time to spare. You're worried that you won't be able to finish one of your assignments on time, and the thought crosses your mind to ask your professor for a deadline extension. But is there any chance they'll actually approve your request? 

The good news is that many teachers are willing to do so—if you go about asking for one in the right way. Let's take a look at how to do so.

What Is an Extension?

So what exactly is an extension? In a basic sense, it means asking for more time to complete an assignment, beyond its original due date. An extension requires graciousness from your professor—who will be making an exception to their policies for your sake. It also implies a commitment from you: a promise that you'll use the extra days wisely to deliver a finished, quality assignment by the (new) submission deadline. 

That said, it's important that such a request be reasonable: You need a good reason for asking for one, and the amount of extra time you need shouldn't be excessive.

Why Should You Ask for an Extension?

When you have an assignment due and you are short on time, whether because you're overloaded, something's happened in your personal life, or just poor planning (hey, it happens!), what are your options? You could turn in a late submission and lose points, if it's even accepted. You can turn in unacceptable work and get a grade you aren't happy with. You could try to get everything done with no sleep and turn in sub-quality work (and possibly collapse from exhaustion). 

Because those options aren't great, you usually don't have anything to lose by asking for an extension, as long as your instructor has not explicitly stated that they never permit them. Whatever the valid reason for your request, oftentimes asking for an extension is a reasonable solution to a problem of time.  

How to Ask for an Extension: Step by Step

Step 1: act now.

If you are thinking about asking for additional time, the sooner you do it, the better. Asking for one at the last minute doesn’t speak well to your ability to manage your schedule and might irritate your teacher. 

Step 2: Check Your Course Policies

But first, you should check the course's syllabus or website to see if your professor has any stated policies about extensions. Do they outright say that they never give them? Do they only give them in certain circumstances, like illness or a death in the family? Do they only consider extending deadlines if given a certain notice, like at least 48 hours before the due date? 

If your instructor has policies like this, pay attention to them. If they explicitly state they do not give extensions, then it's probably only worth asking for one in the case of an extreme, unplanned emergency.

Step 3: Write an Email to Your Professor

While it's often preferable to ask for an extension in person, like visiting your professor during their office hours, this isn't always possible. The next best thing is to write a brief email to your instructor as soon as possible. Here are a few things to consider:

Explain why you need the extension. 

  • Is it for a personal reason? For instance, are you behind schedule because of an illness, a personal crisis (like a family issue), or your job's schedule?
  • Is it for an academic reason? For example, do you have multiple major assignments from your classes due on the same day or in the same week? 
  • Is it because you procrastinated? If that's the case, then it's better to be truthful and just say so. Don't be tempted to lie to your teacher and make up an excuse. 

Keep it professional. 

There's no need to go overboard with personal details. Your professor doesn't need to know your exact temperature or how many boxes of Kleenex you've gone through if you're sick, they just need to know you're behind because of an illness. 

Provide a plan and new deadline.  

Will you be able to finish the assignment in one extra day, for instance, or do you need more time? 

It's better to be realistic about your time and not overpromise. If there's no chance you'll be able to finish an assignment in 24 hours, don't promise that. 

Accept responsibility when appropriate. 

You can't help it if you are sick or if there has been an unavoidable personal crisis. But if you're asking for an extension because you managed your time badly or because of something else that was in your control, acknowledge that fact. 

If this applies to you, let your instructor know that you'll take steps to avoid the problem in the future. For instance, you might say that you're going to start visiting your school's writing lab once a week to stay accountable and finish assignments by their deadline.

Thank your professor. 

Make sure to close your email by thanking them for considering your request, and let them know you understand if it is not possible. They will appreciate your humility and recognition that the decision is up to them. 

If your request is approved, make sure to thank your professor right away.

How to Increase the Chances of Approval

  • Ask as far ahead of the original deadline as possible.
  • Give a specific reason for your request, but don't go crazy with details.
  • Admit it if you need the extension because you planned poorly.
  • Provide new due date.
  • Offer a plan for how you will finish your work. 
  • Thank your professor for considering your request.

Sample Emails

Scenario 1 (an overloaded week).

I've been working on my draft for the English 102 essay, but this week has been really difficult for me. In addition to the essay due Thursday, I have a sociology exam on Monday, and my chemistry professor just bumped our midterm from next Tuesday to this Thursday. I'd planned to finish my essay on Tuesday and Wednesday and study for my exam over the weekend, but now I also need to study for my chemistry midterm earlier in the week. Would it be possible to have an extension for my essay to Friday at midnight?

I could really use the extra days to make the essay the best it can be while also balancing studying for my exams. Please let me know if you would like to meet during your office hours to discuss this further. I appreciate your consideration of my request. 

[Your name]

Scenario 2 (Illness)

Dear X, 

My name is [insert your name], and I am a student in your 1 p.m. Tuesday/Thursday Chemistry 110 class. I know that our next exam is this Thursday, and I've been studying regularly, including visiting the Science Learning Center on Mondays and Wednesdays for extra practice. However, I've been sick with the flu since Saturday and have fallen behind. Would it be possible to schedule a make-up exam for next Monday or Tuesday? I should be better by then and will use the extra days to be as prepared as I can be. I understand if this is just not possible, but I appreciate your consideration of my request. 

[Insert your name]

Scenario 3 (A Death in the Family)

I am sorry to say that last night my Aunt Exene passed away suddenly. I am now traveling home to be with my family. I know that my Marketing 202 presentation is scheduled for Friday, but I will not be able to return to campus until Sunday, after the funeral. Is it possible to have an extension to early next week for my presentation? I will be able to give the presentation next Monday or Wednesday. I understand if this is just not possible, but I appreciate your consideration of my request. 

Sincerely, 

Scenario 4 (Procrastination)

My name is [Insert your name], and I am a student in your Sociology 201 breakout session. I know that our take-home exam is due in two days, but I am wondering if I can have a short extension for the exam. I will be honest and say that I have simply procrastinated and fallen behind in preparing for the exam. However, this class is important to me, as a prospective sociology major, and I want the exam to reflect my best effort. 

Would it be possible for me to have an extra day for the exam? I have just signed up for the optional study group sessions and will be attending those moving forward so that I stay accountable and do not fall behind in the future. I understand if it is not possible, but I truly appreciate your consideration of my request. 

What to Do if Your Request Is Denied

In the best case scenario, your request will be approved right away, you'll thank your professor, you'll get the work done by the new deadline, and all will be right with the world. But there's always a chance that your instructor will deny your request. 

If that happens, the best thing to do is to accept it and respect their decision. Complaining will not help the situation and will probably irritate your teacher. If your request is denied, thank your professor again for considering. Do the best you can with the assignment and focus on the future. It's only one assignment, after all, and life will go on. 

The exception is if you are asking for an extension for a very serious extenuating circumstance, such as a death in your immediate family or a severe injury or illness. These kinds of situations are often handled differently. If you truly need more leeway for a very serious reason and your instructor will not compromise, consider talking to an academic support office.

Depending on your school, this might be a Dean of Students office, your academic advisor, a counseling center, or a similar office. If you are going through a serious personal situation, it's a good idea to be in touch with this office anyway so they can provide support.  

good reasons for assignment extension

How To Write an Email For Extension Of Assignment

Navigating the delicate task of requesting an extension for your assignment doesn’t have to be daunting. With this comprehensive guide, we’ll walk you through each critical step you need to undertake before crafting your email, what essential details to include within it, and offer you customizable email templates to streamline your correspondence.

Table of Contents

What To Do Before Writing the Email

Before you start writing the email, there are a few important steps you should take:

  • Review the assignment guidelines thoroughly to understand the requirements and deadline.
  • Evaluate your current progress on the assignment and determine if an extension is truly necessary.
  • Check if your professor or instructor has specific guidelines or procedures for requesting extensions.
  • Gather any supporting documentation or evidence that may strengthen your case for an extension (e.g., medical certificates, unexpected personal circumstances).

What to Include In the Email

When composing the email, make sure to include the following elements:

  • Subject Line: Clearly state your request for an extension in a concise and professional manner.
  • Greeting: Address the recipient respectfully, using proper salutations such as “Dear Professor [Last Name].”
  • Introduction: Briefly introduce yourself and provide context for your email. Explain the assignment you’re seeking an extension for, including the due date.
  • Reason for Extension: Clearly and honestly explain why you need an extension. Be specific about the circumstances and provide supporting evidence if available.
  • New Deadline: Propose a realistic new deadline by which you can complete the assignment. Ensure it allows sufficient time for quality work.
  • Appreciation: Express your gratitude for considering your request and acknowledge the understanding and flexibility of the recipient.
  • Closing: Use a polite closing statement such as “Sincerely” or “Best regards,” followed by your name and contact information.

Email Template

Subject: Request for Extension of Assignment – [Course Code/Name] Dear Professor [Last Name], I hope this email finds you well. My name is [Your Name] and I am currently enrolled in your [Course Code/Name]. I am writing to kindly request an extension for the upcoming assignment due on [Due Date]. Due to [explain your circumstances clearly and concisely], I am facing challenges in completing the assignment on time. Therefore, I would greatly appreciate it if you could grant me an extension of [number of days/weeks]. This additional time would allow me to fully address all requirements and submit a high-quality assignment. I have attached [any supporting documents or evidence if applicable] to provide further context and support my request. Please let me know if this extension is feasible, and if so, the new deadline that you deem appropriate. I understand that you may have other commitments and constraints, so I am willing to be flexible. Thank you for considering my request and for your understanding. I value your guidance and feedback, and I am committed to delivering excellent work. Sincerely, [Your Name] [Email Address] [Phone Number]

Alternative Email Template

Subject: Extension Request – [Course Code/Name] Dear Professor [Last Name], I trust this email finds you in good health. I am writing to discuss the possibility of an extension for the upcoming assignment in your [Course Code/Name]. With utmost regret, unforeseen circumstances have hindered my ability to complete the assignment within the given timeframe. These challenges include [explain your circumstances briefly]. Considering the importance of comprehensive research and original analysis required for this assignment, I kindly request an extension of [number of days/weeks]. This extension will allow me to meet the assignment’s standards and contribute to the learning objectives of the course. Your understanding and flexibility in accommodating this request would be immensely appreciated. If you require any additional information or documentation, please do not hesitate to let me know. Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to your favorable response. Best regards, [Your Name] [Email Address] [Phone Number]

Requesting an extension for your assignment can be a nerve-wracking task, but by following these guidelines and utilizing one of the provided email templates, you can confidently communicate your need for more time in a professional and respectful manner.

Remember, it is crucial to outline your reasons clearly, propose a realistic new deadline, and express your gratitude for the recipient’s understanding. Communicating effectively will increase your chances of receiving a positive response.

Good luck with your assignment, and don’t forget to plan your time wisely to avoid such situations in the future!

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How to Write a Letter Asking for an Extension

Last Updated: March 24, 2024 References

This article was co-authored by Alexander Ruiz, M.Ed. . Alexander Ruiz is an Educational Consultant and the Educational Director of Link Educational Institute, a tutoring business based in Claremont, California that provides customizable educational plans, subject and test prep tutoring, and college application consulting. With over a decade and a half of experience in the education industry, Alexander coaches students to increase their self-awareness and emotional intelligence while achieving skills and the goal of achieving skills and higher education. He holds a BA in Psychology from Florida International University and an MA in Education from Georgia Southern University. There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 3,067,513 times.

Alexander Ruiz, M.Ed.

Sample Letters

good reasons for assignment extension

Sample Emails

good reasons for assignment extension

Following Formal Letter Writing Conventions

Step 1 Prepare a header section.

  • If you are sending your request via email, you can omit the date and address portions and start with your salutation. However, make sure to use an effective and clear subject line. For example, if you are emailing a professor, your subject line might read, "Mike Smith HIST 359 Paper Extension Request."

Step 2 Employ a formal and full salutation.

  • Even if you know them informally, this is an official request so keep the tone and content formal. Do not write “Hi, Jim,” for example.
  • Try to find some specific person that you can address your letter to. Otherwise, it can appear like a form letter. For example, “Dear Senator Smith,” is preferable to, “To Whom It May Concern.” [2] X Research source

Step 3 Use a concise paragraph format.

  • To open your letter you might state, “I am John Smith a student in your HIST 456 MWF morning class.” This will jog your professor’s memory and save them time looking you up.

Step 4 Pay attention to your concluding remarks.

  • It is best to close with an official “sign off” before your name. Some of the better options are: “Sincerely” “Best” “All the Best” “Best Regards.” [3] X Research source
  • If you need a reply by a certain time, you should include that information at this point as well. You can always pair it with your thanks. For example, “Thank you for your consideration and I look forward to hearing from you next week.” Just be careful not to appear overly pushy. [4] X Research source

Step 5 Include your full name and signature.

Crafting the Content of the Letter

Step 1 Write the letter as soon as you can.

  • Depending on the situation, you might need to consider your letter as part of an ongoing negotiation. In that sense, it is better to ask for a longer amount of time so that you can compromise and meet in the middle. [7] X Research source
  • Gauge your pace based upon your current progress and what parts of the project have yet to be completed. For example, if you have worked on a consulting project for three months you should have a pretty good sense of how much is left to do.
  • Be aware of the time constraints facing the recipient as well. They may be under their own deadlines that will now need to be pushed back. For example, college professors are often required to submit midterm grades and schedule their paper deadlines accordingly.

Step 3 Be aware of the existing rules.

  • A good reason might be the desire to be thorough or cautious in your work. For instance, if you are completing a project that could potentially impact the safety of others, pointing this fact out when asking for extra time could work in your favor.
  • If you have multiple reasons for your request, choose the best one and focus on it. For example, if you are delaying a job offer you might want to tell them that you would like to conduct additional research into the transfer costs (if this is indeed true) instead of letting them know that you are also waiting on another offer. [9] X Research source

Step 5 Provide a few carefully chosen details as part of your request.

  • For example, if your grandfather dies two days before your college essay is due, it is best to describe the incident as a “family emergency” as opposed to a general “emergency.” You may also want to mention his passing and some information about your travel arrangements. [11] X Research source
  • Have your paperwork in order before submitting any request. You may need to lay out a timeline of prior actions and applications, especially if dealing with the government or another official entity. Showing that you have followed all steps of the process up until this point can only work in your favor. [12] X Research source

Step 6 Stay positive in tone and content.

Sending the Letter to the Recipient

Step 1 Make or save a copy of your letter.

  • If you are going to mail off a hard copy of your letter, make sure to print it out using a high quality printer with a good ink cartridge. A handwritten extension request is generally not acceptable. [14] X Research source

Step 3 Email your extension request.

  • Your recipient may be able to see the exact time that you sent the email. Be aware of this if you like to send off emails very late at night.
  • Keep your email formal and that includes the address that you use as well. Send this email from a professional-sounding account. For example, sending a work email from “[email protected]” is appropriate.
  • If you send your letter via fax, make sure to hold on to the confirmation page showing that your transmission was successfully sent and received.

Step 4 Make a phone call instead of writing.

Expert Q&A

Alexander Ruiz, M.Ed.

  • Try to keep your letter at one page of length or less. This makes it appear complete, yet easy to skim through. [15] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Be aware if your recipient will send you something in return, such as a confirmation letter. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

good reasons for assignment extension

  • Be realistic in the promises that you make. You do not want to get an extension only to spend the extra time completing additional work. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Check to make sure that you’ve included all necessary forms with your request. And, some groups will require that you use their form letter as a template. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 1
  • Make this one-time extension request count. You do not want to try for another one. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

You Might Also Like

Write a Letter of Request

  • ↑ Alexander Ruiz, M.Ed.. Educational Consultant. Expert Interview. 18 June 2020.
  • ↑ http://www.uwgb.edu/UWGBCMS/media/career-services/files/pdf/Professional-Letters-Guide.pdf
  • ↑ https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/writing-help/how-to-write-a-business-letter
  • ↑ https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-a-deadline-extension-without-losing-your-street-cred
  • ↑ http://www.monster.ca/career-advice/article/delaying-a-job-offer-ca
  • ↑ http://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2013/09/how-to-get-an-extenstion-on-a-paper/be-specific
  • ↑ http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/recourse-recours/extensionoftime-prorogationdedelai-eng.html

About This Article

Alexander Ruiz, M.Ed.

To write a letter asking for an extension, start with a formal salutation, like "Dear Professor Montgomery." Then, in the body of your letter, state that you'd like an extension and explain why you need one. You should also include a new, realistic deadline that you think you can meet. Remember to keep the tone of your letter positive so it doesn't seem like you're whining or complaining. Also, try to limit your letter to 1-3 paragraphs so that it's short and straightforward. To learn how to end your letter, scroll down! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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How To Ask For An Extension On An Assignment – Calltutors

Do you want to know how to ask for an extension on an assignment? if yes, then don’t worry! In this blog, I have provided some samples and tips to ask for an extension on an assignment.

An extension on an assignment could be essential for a variety of reasons. To finish a paper or project, a student must request additional time. A polite way to seek an extension is via a formal email written with sincerity and tact. It should take into account the recipient’s conditions for granting the extension, as well as any institution-specific extension regulations.

If you’re having trouble following instructions or don’t have enough time to finish a task, it’s also worth asking for an extension. And this would have an impact on the whole class, talking to your professor about your issues could be the best course of action.

And if you are prepared to ask for a renewal, you can always lose your opinion.

Your safest choice is to send an email to your professor.

Explain why you’re seeking an extension and suggest a new deadline in a respectful manner.

In this post, you’ll learn how to request an extension and why you should do so. And also if you need assignment help online from experts, then you can contact our experts to get top-notch assignment service within the given deadline.

For your convenience, we’ve included a sample letter requesting an extension of an assignment.

Are you ever stumped for words? Check it out.

  • Wherever possible, meet with your mentor in person
  • Avoid asking questions at the last minute
  • Inform them that you have other papers due at the same time
  • Only a brief extension is requested
  • Exhibit feelings
  • Describe how the circumstances have changed

Creating Your Justification

  • Review the policies of your course
  • If you claim to be ill, provide evidence
  • If you have a personal emergency, be forthright about it
  • If you are overburdened with jobs, notify your professor
  • Take the “numbers” approach
  • Maintain a straightforward approach

Politely inquiring

  • As soon as possible, inquire
  • Make an in-person approach to your professor
  • Send an email to your instructor to inquire about an extension
  • Determine the length of the extension

Why Do Students Ask For An Extension On An Assignment?

Table of Contents

There are a lot of reasons why students ask for an extension on an assignment some of which are below:

Personal illness or emergency

The first reason is personal illness or emergency. Many students have been ill or have had a personal emergency that has impacted completing the assignment on time. That’s why they ask for an extension. 

Technical Difficulties With Equipment Or Internet Access

Many students can’t complete their assignments on time because they have been experiencing technical difficulties such as a broken computer or poor internet connection. So, that’s why this can impact completing an assignment on time. If you are one of them, and you provide documents of proof of these issues can help you to support your request for an extension. 

Lack Of Understanding Or Difficulty With The Material

Many students are struggling with their assignments because of a lack of knowledge or difficulty with the material. This can be reasonable to ask for an extension to get more time to study or seek additional help from assignment help tutors . 

Work Or Other Time-Consuming Activities

Many students can’t complete their assignments on time because they have work or other activities that are taking a lot of their time. 

Unexpected Events

Many students get unexpected events because of that they can’t complete their assignments on time. So, they can ask for an extension on an assignment. 

Sample Of Writing Email For An Extension On Assignment

Since emails for extensions request a favor, several people are humiliated, and it’s hard to articulate oneself..

For people in challenging or unforeseen situations however, extension e-mails are common.

And, if the emails are written in the right format and respectful and straightforward, There’s nothing inconvenient to experience.

Sample 1: How To Ask For An Extension On An Assignment

Sample 2: how to ask for an extension on an assignment, sample 3: how to ask for an extension on an assignment, how to ask for extra time on an assignment with justifications / excuses.

  • I have a holiday scheduled that I can’t alter.
  • I’m having a panic attack/depression episode. I’ve scheduled an appointment with a doctor as soon as possible.
  • I’m planning a wedding that will take a lot of time.
  • I’ve caught a cold and am confined to my bunk.
  • I was called in for long shifts at work, and I desperately need the money.
  • I’m having problems with my device. This is a screenshot of the issue.
  • I was under the impression that the assignment was due the following week. It wasn’t until this morning that I realised!

Tips To Ask For An Extension On An Assignment

  • Give a clear reason – When asking for an extension, it’s important to give a clear reason for why you need an extension for an assignment. Because it can help the professor understand your situation and make a decision. 
  • Use A Polite And Professional Tone – You should use a polite and professional tone when you ask for an extension because it can help your professor feel comfortable and more likely to grant your request. 
  • Explain The Situation – Clearly explain the reason why you need an extension for an assignment. And also you should tell your professor the truth don’t say lie to his/her.
  • Provide a plan and new deadline – provide a plan for completing the assignment, including a new deadline and any steps you will take to ensure that you meet the new deadline. 
  • Show appreciation: you should express appreciation for the professor’s understanding and help in granting the extension. 

Since emails for extensions request a favor, several people are humiliated, And it’s hard to articulate oneself. For people in challenging or unforeseen situationes however, extension e-mails are common.

Likewise, if you want to apply an impressive assignment that needs more investigation,

A formal letter can then be sent. This gives you more time to improve and to make your job even more attractive.

Even if you think that there are not enough resources to complete the project, Via an application, you can share your concerns.

Here it is necessary to question and explain the delay early. Make an effort to prepare accordingly with the deadlines.

to stay away from those situations If you’re very short on time, though,Our team of writers, all of whom have at least 7 years of academic writing experience, will guide you through the process. Calltutors will help you with last-minute assignment help .

What is a good reason for an assignment extension?

A good reason for an assignment extension would be an unforeseen and unavoidable circumstance that prevents the student from completing the assignment on time, such as a serious illness or family emergency.

What is the best way to get an extension?

The best way to request an extension is to reach out to the instructor or professor in a timely manner, prior to the original due date. The student should provide a clear and specific explanation of the reason for the extension request and provide any relevant documentation to support the request. It is also important to be respectful and professional in the request and to be willing to discuss any potential alternatives or accommodations that may be available.

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A Guide to Writing a Deadline Extension Email to Your Professor

Stefani H.

Table of contents

We’ve all been in that tough spot – the one where a deadline is creeping up, and you find yourself racing against time. You desperately need an extension to complete your assignment, but you find yourself at crossroads.

On the one hand, you understand the importance of timely submission, but on the other, you realize that getting that extra time will positively impact the quality of your assignment.

In such a situation, it is a good idea to write a professional email to your professor , asking for an extension. You need to effectively communicate your situation and make a sincere request for additional time.

What are the reasons to ask for an extension on an assignment?

There can be various reasons for requesting extra time for your assignment. While some reasons may be viewed as mere excuses, there are genuine and acceptable circumstances that may warrant asking for an extension. Let's explore some reasons for requesting additional time to work on your assignment.

  • Sudden injury or illness (physical and mental).
  • Sudden decline in long-term health condition.
  • Significant and unexpected personal challenges such as the death of a loved one or family obligations.
  • Natural disaster.
  • Technical difficulties hinder the assignment.
  • Additional research is required.
  • Overlapping deadlines or class schedules.

While the last three reasons may not be universally acceptable across all colleges, the key lies in how you communicate and present these reasons to your professor. Proper positioning and articulation can make a difference in how your request is perceived and considered.

That said, if your “reason” is not a legitimate one and you fear that your request will be turned down, why not hire an urgent writing service like Writers Per Hour to write your essay? Our last minute essay writers are trained to research, write and proofread within quick turnarounds ranging from 24 hours and 16 hours to 8 hours and even 5 hours – without compromising the quality.

9 tips for writing an email requesting an assignment deadline extension

While you’re drowning in deadlines, writing a respectful, clear, and concise email to your professor asking for an extension is no joke. Let's explore tips for writing an email that could potentially secure that much-needed additional time.

1. Don’t wait till the last day

It's common to procrastinate when faced with tasks that are challenging or evoke negative emotions. Writing a deadline extension email is one such task, but students don’t realize that waiting till the last minute to write this email can undermine their chances of getting an extension.

Moreover, sending this request a day prior to the deadline (or, worse, on the day of submission) puts unnecessary pressure on the professor. Reaching out early shows that you are proactive in managing your workload and respecting their time.

2. Write a professional subject line

The email subject line is your opportunity to make a strong first impression and ensure your email is noticed promptly. The subject line needs to be concise, clear, and professional. Be sure to keep it simple and stay within the 60-character limit so it appears entirely in the inbox.

Here are examples of some good subject lines for your deadline extension email:

  • Request for extension: [Assignment name]
  • Seeking extension for [Assignment name]
  • Deadline extension request: [Assignment name]
  • Request for deadline extension: [Assignment name]

Notice how these subject lines are informative and to the point. One look at it, and the professor will know what you’re getting at.

Here are some examples of subject lines you must avoid:

  • Please give me more time!
  • Urgent help required
  • Extension needed urgently
  • Need an extension ASAP

Not only do these subject lines lack clarity, but they also sound demanding, impolite, and entitled.

3. Introduce yourself in brief

Your professor is likely to receive emails from several students, which is why it’s important to start with a brief introduction of yourself. It should include the following:

  • Course and section details;
  • Assignment details.

Here’s an example of the introduction:

Dear Mr/Ms [first name],

I hope this email finds you well. My name is [your name], and I am a student in your [course name, section number] class. I am writing to kindly request a deadline extension for the [assignment name] that is due on [deadline].

4. Address your commitment to deadlines

Now that you’ve introduced yourself before you move on to the reason for the extension, it’s a good idea to emphasize your commitment to deadlines.

It shows you take academic responsibilities seriously and understand the importance of deadlines. Don’t spend more than a sentence or two on this part.

You can mention that you typically prioritize meeting deadlines and explain that the circumstances leading to the request for an extension are exceptional. For instance, you can write:

Throughout the course, I have consistently strived to submit assignments promptly, recognizing the importance of timely completion in my own learning process. However, unforeseen circumstances have arisen recently that have made it challenging for me to meet the original deadline for this particular assignment.

5. State the reason for the extension

Coming to the meat of the email – the reason for the extension. This is the section that will get maximum attention.

Make sure you clearly state the reasons without beating about the bush. Provide a brief explanation of the circumstances that made it challenging for you to meet the deadline. Remember: stick to the important details instead of getting into unnecessary personal information.

Here’s an example of an appropriate explanation:

The recent unexpected family emergency I experienced required my immediate attention and has significantly disrupted my ability to meet the original deadline.

As opposed to the below that delves into unnecessary, irrelevant details:

Unfortunately, a recent unexpected family emergency occurred, resulting in a series of events that demanded my immediate attention and made it extremely challenging for me to focus on my coursework. The emergency involved a medical situation that required hospitalization and ongoing care for a family member, which caused immense emotional distress and affected my ability to allocate sufficient time to the assignment. I have been juggling multiple responsibilities and attending to various family matters, leaving me unable to give the assignment the attention it deserves.

6. Mention the progress made in the assignment

Many students make the mistake of leaving out the progress they’ve made while writing the deadline extension email.

It’s important to be transparent about the work you’ve done so far because it lets them assess the level of effort you have put in. It shows your willingness and dedication to complete the task to the best of your abilities.

Here’s an example of what you can write to demonstrate the progress made:

I have made significant progress on the assignment. I have conducted thorough research, gathered relevant sources, and started outlining my ideas for the content. I have also completed the introduction and have made substantial headway in developing the main body of the assignment. However, I believe that the remaining sections require more time to refine and polish to meet the desired quality standards.

7. Propose a new deadline

Your deadline extension email is incomplete without a proposed new deadline. It is essential to include a specific timeline as a proposal in your email, demonstrating your commitment to completing the assignment within a reasonable timeframe.

While the ultimate decision lies with your professor, suggesting a new deadline shows your proactive approach and respect for their schedule and course requirements.

Make sure the revised deadline is feasible and gives you time to finish it to the best of your ability. It’s also a good idea to briefly explain the rationale behind why you believe the proposed deadline is reasonable.

8. End the email with gratitude

While ending the deadline extension email, show your appreciation by thanking the professor for their understanding and consideration. Keep it short and simple without introducing any new information.

You must also use this space to show your willingness to discuss this matter or provide further information if needed.

Here’s an example:

Thank you for your understanding and consideration of my request. I truly appreciate your guidance and support in this matter. Should you require any further information or have any suggestions, please let me know. I look forward to your response.

[Your name]

Assignment extension request email sample

Here’s an example of a deadline extension email you can send your professor:

Throughout the course, I have consistently strived to submit assignments promptly, recognizing the importance of timely completion in my own learning process.

However, the recent unexpected family emergency I experienced required my immediate attention and significantly disrupted my ability to meet the original deadline.

I have made significant progress on the assignment. I have conducted thorough research, gathered relevant sources, and started outlining my ideas for the content. I have also completed the introduction and have made substantial headway in developing the main body of the assignment.

I believe that an extension of [proposed deadline] would allow me to complete the assignment to the best of my abilities and ensure a submission that aligns with the quality standards expected.

Thank you for your understanding and consideration of my request. If there are any adjustments or alternative deadlines that better align with your schedule, I am open to discussing them. Thank you for your guidance and support.

Key takeaway

A part of you might shy away from writing a deadline extension email and wonder, “Do I really need to?”. The answer is yes because it shows that you take responsibility and respect your college’s policies.

The next time you find yourself in need of a deadline extension, approach it with confidence, professionalism, and courtesy. With these tips in mind, you can effectively communicate your request and navigate the process with grace.

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School of Social and Political Science

Reasons for requesting an extension, suitable reasons for requesting extensions.

Good reasons for coursework extensions are unexpected short-term circumstances which are exceptional for the individual student, beyond that student’s control, and which could reasonably be expected to have had an adverse impact on the student’s ability to complete the assessment on time.

These may include:

  • Recent short-term physical illness or injury;
  • Recent short-term mental ill-health;
  • A long-term or chronic physical health condition, which has recently worsened temporarily or permanently;
  • A long-term or chronic mental health condition, which has recently worsened temporarily or permanently;
  • The recent bereavement or serious illness of a person with whom the student has a close relationship;
  • The recent breakdown in a long-term relationship, such as a marriage;
  • Emergencies involving dependents;
  • Job or internship interview at short notice that requires significant time, e.g. due to travel;
  • Victim of a crime which is likely to have significant emotional impact;
  • Military conflict, natural disaster, or extreme weather conditions.

In addition to these unexpected circumstances, Schools will also consider requests for coursework extensions in relation to:

  • A student’s disability where the student’s Learning Profile includes relevant provisions (please note aLearning Profile will be treated sympathetically as part of the case for an extension. A Learning Profile itself does not guarantee an extension.
  • Representation in performance sport at an international or national championship level, in line with the  University’s Performance Sport Policy.

Unsuitable reasons

The following are examples of circumstances which would not be considered good reasons for coursework extensions:

  • A long-term or chronic health condition (including mental ill-health or similar ill-health) which has not worsened recently or for which the University has already made a reasonable adjustment;
  • A minor short-term illness or injury (e.g. a common cold), which would not reasonably have had a significant adverse impact on the student’s ability to complete the assessment on time;
  • Occasional low mood, stress or anxiety;
  • Circumstances which were foreseeable or preventable;
  • Pressure of academic work (unless this contributes to ill-health);
  • Poor time-management;
  • Proximity to other assessments;
  • Lack of awareness of dates or times of assessment submission;
  • Failure, loss or theft of data, a computer or other equipment;
  • Commitments to paid or voluntary employment.

Where a student has good reason for requiring a coursework extension of more than seven calendar days , the student should submit the coursework when able to do so and apply via the Special Circumstances process for the Board of Examiners.

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Professor shares secrets on getting an extension (w/ template)

About the author

Hi there. I am the prolific professor with 15 years of experience teaching online and in-person. I have a graduate degree. I have a passion for education. But I’ve also worked in the professional world (outside of education) too. Thanks for visiting.

You are going to want to read this.

I have some secrets to tell you.

I was a professor for 15 years. And I received countless emails for extensions on assignments.

I have heard every excuse, some real and some completely made-up. And I had to turn lots of students away.

You are going to get the low down on the key to getting an extension. It may not work for everyone because let’s face it, not everyone deserves an extension.

But with these tips and my email template asking your professor for an extension, you’ll be better prepared.

Should you ask your professor for an extension?

It may be appropriate to ask your professor for an extension when you have a valid reason like a hospitalization, severe illness, death of an immediate family member, or something similar. Otherwise your professor is unlikely to give you an extension unless you have some additional documentation to support your need for an extension.

I would not ask for an extension if you could have avoided this dilemma to begin with.

If you could have completed the assignment with adequate planning, don’t ask your professor for an extension.

For example, if you took a vacation and lost track of time, don’t ask. If you decided to work extra hours and have been too busy, don’t ask. You get the point.

If you are asking for an extension at the last minute, you should really have a very good excuse and necessary documentation to support it.

Remember, your professor likely has hundreds of students. And may get dozens of requests for an extension. They can’t give them to everyone that asks so it needs to be something really serious.

But if something serious has happened, that was completely out of your control, it could be helpful to ask for an extension.

So, before you ask for an extension, answer these questions first.

Could I have taken the necessary steps to complete this ahead of time but planned poorly?

Can I still complete the assignment with some expedience?

Am I missing the proper documentation to support my excuse?

If you answered yes to all these questions, you probably shouldn’t ask for an extension.

But you know your professor best, and perhaps they are lenient and will oblige.

Something that I need to mention is that sometimes things can happen that are serious enough to warrant an extension but aren’t talked about often.

If you have a mental illness and have had some recent issues related to your health, you might talk to your professor.

You probably have a lot of questions about this, and I have a complete article dedicated to talking to your professor about your mental health.

An outgoing email message symbol with the words extension please written below

What’s a good excuse to ask for an extension?

I need to tell you something important. When you need an extension, it should be for a REAL reason. You don’t want to make-up lies to get an extension.

And you should follow your professor’s policies and not abuse their discretion.

Read their syllabus and see what their policies are. Maybe they already have a policy that answers your questions. I would abide by their policies, especially if they have a zero-tolerance policy.

So, I would never advise that you make-up an excuse to get an extension or exaggerate your circumstances.

Now, you might be wondering when professors are more likely to give an extension on an assignment.

Here are some situations where I would consider an extension or make-up assignment. This isn’t a complete list but a few of some of the most common situations.

Funeral - If you had a death and a funeral in your immediate family, this would be an acceptable excuse. But if you had a funeral for a third cousin, I am not certain every professor would give you an extension.

Hospitalization - If you were physically hospitalized, this usually warrants an extension on an assignment. Be prepared to have some documentation. This usually includes your own hospitalization, not family members.

Severe illness - We aren’t talking about a little cough and a few sniffles, but a serious illness. And usually something that can be verified with a doctor’s note. If you can’t personally make it to the doctor, see if you can do a virtual visit instead.

Student-related activity - If you are traveling for a sport, student organization, professional conference, etc, usually you’ll get a pass.

Military related duties - In some instances, you might be given orders to travel for the military. I can’t find a time when you wouldn’t immediately get an extension granted.

Natural disaster - Sometimes mother nature can be cruel. I have seen students’ homes be devastated by hurricanes and tornadoes. And they couldn’t travel to the campus, or they didn’t have access to their internet.

Disability - If you have a documented disability, you might be able to get an extension. It is even better if you have accommodations through your college.

Most other situations can be predicted, and you can work on the assignment early.

As you can see, most of these situations aren’t easily predicted and don’t come with advanced warning.

If you could have adequately planned to work ahead, and complete it before the deadline, you probably won’t get an extension.

a college student holding their phone with little fake email messages floating around it

What’s the best way to ask a professor for an extension?

The best way to ask your professor for an extension is in person because this is more personable and I think your professor will have a harder time saying no when they see you face-to-face.

How to ask a professor for an extension through email

Ask as early as possible

Be detailed

Send documentation

Example of how to ask for an extension by email

I have an email template below to help you write an excellent email to your professor asking for an extension. This can also work for makeup exams and assignments too. Just remember to be honest and alter the email to fit your personal circumstances.

Dear Professor Smith. I am in your ENGL 1301 class and I have been enjoying the recent discussion regarding proper grammar usage. I know we have an assignment due soon over this topic, and I am concerned about having the adequate time to complete this assignment. I am committed to this course, and with my current situation, I would be rushed to complete the assignment. I am worried that I wouldn’t do my best on the assignment, and would miss the opportunity to learn and apply the skills I have learned so far. I recently experienced a death in the family of my maternal grandmother. I have the obituary attached to this email to provide you with some documentation. These recent days have been filled with grief and many meetings for funeral plans. With this in mind, I am asking for an extension. I would like a few days to spend time with my family and gather myself emotionally to have the dedicated time to complete this assignment. It is important to me that I learn the material and spend quality time working on this course. Please let me know if you need anything else. I appreciate your time.

I know your email is going to vary based on your circumstances, so I have general information for you below to use as an outline for your email to your professor asking for an extension.

First introduce yourself. Don’t assume your professor knows who you are. Make sure they can place a face with a name. Give them some information so that they can remember who you are.

Then give a polite comment about the course regarding your dedication to the class. Make sure they know that the course material is of the upmost importance to you.

You should make note that you aren’t merely worried about your grade, but want to really understand the material and take the proper time to complete the assignment to submit your best work.

Then explain what happened in your personal life that warrants an extension. And then provide them with as much documentation, or at least offer it.

Finally, thank them for their time and understanding.

Before you send this email, I want you to understand that your professor cannot grant every student who asks an extension.

If they say no, and they are following their course policies, thank them for their time and move on.

Be as polite as possible because your professor has a job to do too.

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13 No-Fail Ways to Get an Extension on a Paper

Procrastinators, rejoice.

Image via Complex Original

Not Available Lead

There are a myriad of reasons why you may not be finish your paper on time: sickness, family emergency, a broken heart, a sudden car wreck. While your professor may not find it as a legitimate excuse, there are some possible ways to steer your professor's decision in your favor, giving you some extra time to nail that mid-term paper. 

It can be a scary and intimidating to ask for an extension on your paper. From finding plausible excuses to being the teacher's pet, here are 13 no-fail ways to get an extension on a paper. 

13. Be upfront about it.

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This is the only option when you really can't offer a valid excuse. In some instances it may be better to be upfront about your mistake and take responsibility. If so, try and finish your essay, and turn it in the day after the paper was due. When you turn it in, make sure you take responsibility for your actions and apologize for the inconvenience. If your professor hasn't graded the essays yet, your professor may be willing to let this one slide. But, if your teacher doesn't give you credit, it's important to ask for feedback on the essay anyway.

12. Be emotional about it.

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This one is likely a hit or miss, but in some cases, it does work. Seeing a student cry is uncomfortable for any teacher, which is why we all have a friend that can attest to the effectiveness of this technique. So, if you come in teary-eyed and make up some sob story as to how your mid-term essay completely went off your radar during the last few weeks, your professor may give you a chance. Let him/her know that making up this grade is of the upmost importance to you. You may want to offer a solution of starting off with a B rather than an A. It's not perfect, but it's better than failing.

11. Don't ask for a long extension.

This should be common sense. If you're asking for an extension, don't ask for anything longer than three days. If you do, you're professor will likely think that you procrastinated the whole semester. To prove that you haven't, it may be to your advantage to send in a rough draft to prove that you have at least been working on it.

10. Be specific in your reasoning.

When informing your professor of a situation, it's very important to be specific. If your reasons are "stress" or "an emergency," chances are your professor won't give you the extension. Asking for an extension is already an inconvenience, and if you're not specific you will likely not get a response, just a failing grade. However, if you fully explain the situation and its specifics, you will increase your chances on that extension. The truth will set you free from that looming deadline.

9. Reach to your professor's heart.

If you want to incite your teacher's sympathy and your excuse is less-than tear-inducing, it might be appropriate to tell a creative rendition of the truth. Been spending way too much time on Facebook? Let's say you have had technical problems and your WiFi gave out. Did you just break up with your significant other and haven't had the time to write anything? Let's say it was a family emergency. It may not work, but your chances often depend on how well you can explain the situation.

8. Ask in person whenever possible.

Going to your professor in person is the most professional way to ask for a paper extension. It may actually be to your advantage if you come off with the perfect combination of placating and modesty if you approach your professor in person. However, if you're lying about the situation, it's probably best if you send an email, lest she see right through your B.S.

7. Offer a solution, not an excuse.

The only time to offer a solution is when you know you screwed up, but still don't necessarily feel like it's your fault. For example, someone stole your USB that had your paper, or your computer crashed and your paper was erased. These situations suck, but if you take responsibility and offer a solution rather than excuse, chances are your professor will work with you. For example, if someone stole your USB and you only have the rough draft, aplogize for the inconvenience and that you will submit an earlier draft of the paper. I did this once, and my professor gave me an extra six hours to formulate the final draft to the best of my ability.

6. Something unexpected happened.

There are just some situations that are out of your control: a funeral, car wreck, or jury duty, for example. These are the sorts of events that come up unexpectedly that would make it excruciatingly difficult to turn in a paper right before it's due. It's absolutely important that you inform your professor as soon as you can. However, your professor will likely ask for proof, so don't attempt to use these situations as a last minute excuse.

5. Make a good impression.

The actual first step to getting an extension on your paper starts on the first day of class. It's important that you show your professor that you're a good student who's  attentive and involved. Participate in discussions and go to office hours. Bottom line: professors are always more inclined to give extensions to students they like.

4. Plan ahead.

Planning ahead is probably the most important thing to remember in asking for a paper extension. In most pressing situations, like in the case of having a full-time job or game days (football players would know this), that professors will grant you a paper extension if you ask ahead. If you ask for a paper extension 12 hours before it's due, chances are your professor will think you just procrastinated and came up with an illegitimate excuse. Don't be that person.

3. You are preparing for a standardized test.

This is applicable for nearly every junior or senior in college. If you have post-college plans including law school or medical school that means you have to take some form of standardized test. Any test like the LSAT, MCAT, or GRE requires a lot of preparation. If you know that your taking any standardized test around a paper due date, politely explain the situation to your professor. In situations like these, they often understand that standardized tests require a lot of mental and physical preparation. However, since standardized test dates are often posted nearly a whole three months before, notify your professor as soon as possible.

2. You have other papers due at the same time.

Every college student knows that papers are the worst to write: they're time consuming, and they're all due at around the same time. It's very common to have close to four papers all due within a two-day time span. If you have any other commitments (like sports or a job) and other papers due on the same date, that is the perfect reason to ask for a paper extension. Inform your professor of your prior engagements—preferably with proof—and do this as soon as you can. Since most professors give a syllabus early in the semester, if you have two projects due on the same day for different classes, ask if you could possibly turn it in a day or a couple of hours later.

1. You have a full-time job.

A full-time job is a big commitment. Not only that, but your big mid-term papers are usually due at a time when your job may need you to work a couple more hours. If you realize you're going to have to clock in from nine to five the whole weekend a paper is due, politely ask your professor for an extension. Say something along the lines that your full-time work schedule won't permit you the time to work on a paper that showcases the best of your ability. Professors understand that some students are working their way through college, and will likely offer you a solution.

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Reasons and evidence for requesting a coursework extension or IMC

A guide to help you understand what would normally be considered acceptable reasons and evidence for an imc or coursework extension.

Further information on IMCs can be found on the following pages:

  • IMCs overview page - a guide to IMC procedures including help to understand if this is the correct route for you and how a claim may affect your academic outcome
  • Submitting an Individual Mitigating Circumstances (IMC) claim - a guide on how to complete and submit your IMC claim
  • Reasons normally accepted

Whatever your mitigating circumstances are for submitting a coursework extension request or submitting an IMC claim, your reason should fall into at least one of these categories:

  • something unexpected and significant has happened or is happening to you
  • something unexpected and significant has happened or is happening to someone else in your life which is impacting on you
  • a significant event outside of your control
  • Reasons not normally accepted

Coursework extensions and IMC claims will not normally be considered valid if the request relates to the following circumstances:

“Normal life" events

These are circumstances you could be reasonably expected to manage alongside your assessment, perhaps with routine support. Examples include minor illness or normal levels of anxiety about assessment, sometimes known as “exam stress”.

Circumstances which are foreseeable and/or preventable

For example, booking a holiday, or not taking steps to ensure your location has a reliable internet connection with which to write and submit your assessment.

Having a busy assessment schedule, not taking steps to manage your time or prioritise your workload

For example, not being aware of your submission dates, having assessments close together or submitting the wrong documentation.

  • Examples of reasons

Please use this list to consider what reason you will give to explain your circumstances when making your request for a coursework extension or an IMC claim.

If your circumstances aren’t listed, you can use ‘Other Valid Reason’ (please see below for examples, which includes the impact of war). You can also contact your Director of Studies , Student Experience Officer (School of Management) or Personal Tutor for advice.

Something happening to you

Examples of ‘physical ill health’ as a reason.

  • Significant physical accident, injury or illness
  • Unexpected worsening of a physical long-term health condition/disability
  • Unexpected or unforeseen events that were not accommodated by an existing DAP ( Disability Access Plan ) for a physical health condition or disability

Examples of ‘Mental health’ as a reason

  • Significant mental injury or illness
  • Unexpected worsening of a long-term mental health condition/disability
  • Unexpected or unforeseen events that were not accommodated by an existing Disability Access Plan (DAP) for a mental health condition or disability

Examples of ‘Disruption in personal life’ as a reason

  • Unexpected personal accommodation crisis
  • Unexpected personal financial crisis
  • Major, and unexpected crisis related to an immigration issue, such as an unexpected outcome to a visa or asylum application with urgent implications
  • Major unplanned changes in work commitments

Examples of ‘Technical issues’ as a reason

For online exams an IMC claim would normally be accepted for technical problems that:

  • significantly reduce the time available to you to complete the assessment
  • significantly impact your performance
  • prevent submission by the end of late exam submission time (if a remote exam)

Examples may include an unforeseen and prolonged absence of a stable internet connection or issues with software.

Incident of bullying, harassment, assault or crime

Being the person harmed in an incident of bullying, harassment, assault or crime.

‘Placement-related’

Placement-related employment events that cannot be rescheduled, e.g. an assessment day for a potential placement employer. This relates only to placements forming part of a University course of study.

Examples of ‘Other valid reason’

  • The impact of a natural disaster: severe weather that prevents submission, civil disruption or major hazard (including a major breakdown in the transport system).
  • The impact of war: any consequences of an ongoing conflict (such as the war in Ukraine) that have a significant impact on your ability to undertake assessments and do not fall under one of the other general categories.
  • For an IMC claim applying to a remote online exam, impact from the exam being scheduled outside of reasonable study hours because you unavoidably need to access it remotely from a country with a significant time difference with the UK (only applicable for fixed-start exams).

Something happening to someone else in your life but impacting on you

A bereavement.

The recent death of someone important to you (family or friend).

  • Serious accident, injury or illness (physical or mental) involving family or friends
  • Disruption in your personal life caused by something happening to a friend/family member(s), for example a home environment that suddenly became disruptive at the time of your remote exam(s)

Examples of ‘Caring responsibilities’ as a reason

  • Unplanned or unexpected circumstances during pregnancy (self or partner) e.g. premature birth, or for a parent with a baby
  • Unexpected (additional or new) caring responsibilities caused by something happening to a friend/family member(s), for example supporting a parent through serious illness
  • What you can submit as evidence

IMC claims require evidence . Evidence provides confirmation of what happened, when. It also helps to provide clarity about your circumstances and how they affected your assessment performance.

Requests for a coursework extension will normally require evidence to support it. Please confirm with the relevant department if this is the case for your specific request.

The exact nature of what your evidence will be depends on your circumstances. These are some examples of what is normally acceptable.

Correspondence or documents from University support services or staff

You may have already told a member of University staff about your circumstances, and so you can provide evidence of that engagement as evidence of the circumstances you are reporting.

Examples of such evidence would include appointment confirmations, email exchanges (including summary e-mails of advice provided by counselling or wellbeing services) and other types of correspondence from any of the following; a Personal Tutor, a Student Experience Officer, or a Director of Studies, Disability Services, Student Support (which includes counselling and wellbeing teams), the Students’ Union, Security, IT Help Desk, the Library, or the Student Immigration Services. This also includes anything you submit to the Report & Support Tool .

You should not need to ask for a specific statement as evidence. Services and staff may not be able to respond in time for your submission if you do make this kind of request, so you should use evidence you already have.

Disability Access Plans (DAPs)

If you have a Disability Access Plan , it may include guidance that coursework extensions are a reasonable adjustment for you should you request them. If extensions are included in your DAP you can simply reference your DAP (or upload a copy) or as evidence where it is required.

For IMC claims, if you experience unexpected or unforeseen events that are not already accommodated in your DAP, please explain how these have impacted your assessment performance.

Statement, correspondence, or documents from external, third party professionals or support services

Examples include a letter, email or statement from services such as the Police, Victim Support, Social Services, NHS services, charity support agencies, external counselling or mental health advice services, etc.

Copies of official documentation

Examples include a death certificate, medical certificate, screenshot of relevant NHS notifications.

Copies of correspondence with/from family/friends at the time the circumstances occurred

Examples include screenshots of text messages or a conversation via a messaging app (with dates). However, a post-event statement from a family member or friend will not normally be acceptable on its own.

Where possible you should seek permission from anyone else involved in your correspondence before sharing it, especially if the conversation is personal in nature.

  • Submitting your evidence

We recognise that some evidence can be difficult to obtain. Therefore:

  • Your evidence does not have to be an official document or certificate, especially if the circumstances are health related and you do not need to provide multiple pieces of evidence if they all confirm the same thing
  • Your evidence may come later than your submission of an IMC claim form. If you need longer to provide evidence, you should explain this on on your claim form. Your claim form must be submitted by the deadline .
  • You do not need to provide original copies of your evidence. With electronic evidence you can provide a screenshot if you need to. With physical documents you can submit a scanned copy or a digital photograph of the original. If you are not comfortable with electronic submission of your evidence, you should speak with your Director of Studies or Student Experience Officer (School of Management) for advice.
  • If you are concerned about providing evidence or about disclosing a sensitive, personal situation you may wish to speak confidentially with SU Advice & Support or Student Support .
  • If your evidence was not originally produced in English, then an official translation must be provided.
  • How to apply for a coursework extension

Our general guidance on coursework extensions includes information on how to apply.

  • How to submit an IMC claim

Please read our overview of IMCs and follow the guidance to submitting an Individual Mitigating Circumstances (IMC) claim .

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Need to Ask for an Extension on an Assignment? Try This

Need to Ask for an Extension on an Assignment

Maybe a project is taking much longer than you expected, you have due dates for several classes around the same time, or other aspects of your life have taken your attention away from your studies. Whatever the case, realizing that you’ll be unable to turn in a paper on time can be stressful.

As with any other problem you face at university, the best thing to do is talk to the people who can help you. In this case, it means reaching out to your professor and asking for an extension. Although you may feel intimidated at the prospect, this is far better than the alternatives: handing in an unfinished assignment or submitting a paper later and potentially receiving a failing grade. Here’s what you can do if you find yourself in this situation.

1. Ask in Advance

Requesting an extension the night before your paper is due will show you lack forward thinking. It may look like you forgot about the assignment until now — which is not a good reason for needing an extension. Whatever reasons you do give will appear disingenuous. Most professors refuse to grant extensions unless the student gives them at least a few days’ notice.

2. Send Your Professor an Email

The best way to approach the topic of an extension is through an email. Keep the email short, polite, and reasonably formal. As well as explaining the situation, it’s a good idea to propose a new deadline that’s just a couple days after the current due date. You could also offer to meet with your professor during office hours to discuss the assignment further.

3. Say Why You Need the Extension

Explain why you’re requesting an extension without providing too much extra detail. The reason could be that you’re struggling to understand the instructions and need extra guidance before you can finish, you’re having trouble acquiring certain resources, or you simply found that there was not enough time to complete the assignment — such as if you need to gather data or perform a great deal of research. If any of these are your reason for needing an extension, there’s a high chance other students are facing the same issues, meaning your professor may end up extending the deadline for everyone.

4. Show That You Are Making Progress

To support your claim that you just need a few extra days to finish your assignment, it’s a good idea to show your professor what you have done so far. This can demonstrate that, with a little extra time, you would produce a great piece of work and receive a much higher grade.

5. Keep Up with Other Homework for the Class

Your professor is more likely to be lenient if you have a good record in class. Whereas you can’t change the past, you can make sure to do well on any tests and hand in any other homework (including when it’s optional) between now and the due date.

One of the best ways to avoid the need for extensions is to improve your study habits. This is easier to achieve when you’re able to study at home without constant distractions. You can receive your own room in a fully-furnished suite at 17Hundred. Our Ontario Tech University off-campus housing is located just a short walk from OTU and has dedicated study spaces on site. Contact us to join the waitlist for a unit.

NOW LEASING FOR 2024

Contact us today to secure your spot!

IMAGES

  1. How To Ask For Assignment Extension With Request Letter Sample?

    good reasons for assignment extension

  2. 5 Steps To Draft An Effective Assignment Deadline Extension Request

    good reasons for assignment extension

  3. Reasons Assignment Help Why Using Examples Is Important In Assignments

    good reasons for assignment extension

  4. 31 Best Assignment Extension Excuses (2020)

    good reasons for assignment extension

  5. How To Ask For Assignment Extension With Request Letter Sample?

    good reasons for assignment extension

  6. HOW TO ASK FOR ASSIGNMENT EXTENSION WITH REQUEST LETTER SAMPLE

    good reasons for assignment extension

COMMENTS

  1. 31 Best Assignment Extension Excuses (2024)

    2. You've had Writer's Block. >>> Related Post: How to Write an Essay at the Last Minute. This extension excuse gets points for honesty. If you come to your teacher and say "Look, I've read all of the readings, but the creativity just hasn't come" then your teacher might just give you a little extra time.

  2. How to Ask for an Extension for your Assignment [Examples + Template]

    Feel free to adapt or use this email template to ask for an extension for your assignment. Dear (Title of your Professor, Dr. Mr. Ms., followed by their last name), My name is (name), and I'm a student in your (name) class. I'm writing you to ask if it might be possible to be granted additional time for the (name of assignment) due on (date).

  3. How to Ask for an Extension on a Paper

    Ask for a shorter extension if possible. Check Circle. Demonstrate your commitment to the class. Be sure to show your professor that you aren't asking for an extension simply because you ran out of time — even if that's partly true. Demonstrate your commitment to the class by including a rough draft of your paper or a description of your ...

  4. Extension Excuses 101: Mastering the Art of Requesting More Time

    Not-so-good excuses for assignment extensions. 1. No excuse: Simply stating you have no reason for an extension is not a valid approach. Honesty and clear communication are important when requesting an extension. 2. Writer's block: While writer's block can be frustrating, it is not generally seen as a valid excuse for an extension.

  5. How to Ask a Professor for an Extension + Example Emails

    This Is Not How to Ask for an Extension on an Assignment . Dear Professor S., I'm so so sorry but I won't be able to turn in the final assignment on time. There's an issue going on in my dorm room and it's really, truly and utterly gross (I won't go into the details). I'll make sure to get the assignment to you soon.

  6. How to Ask for an Extension on an assignment

    Evaluate the validity of your reasons for requesting an extension: Take an honest look at the reasons behind your request. Are they legitimate and reasonable? Ensure that you have valid grounds for needing additional time to complete the assignment. Consider the assignment's requirements: Review the assignment guidelines and instructions carefully.

  7. How to Ask for an Extension

    Ask as far ahead of the original deadline as possible. Give a specific reason for your request, but don't go crazy with details. Admit it if you need the extension because you planned poorly. Provide new due date. Offer a plan for how you will finish your work. Thank your professor for considering your request.

  8. How to Ask for an Assignment Extension

    What to Keep in Mind Before Asking for an Extension. First, understanding your professor's reluctance can be helpful. Hint: It's not because they hate you or want you to fail. "The question ...

  9. How to Ask a Professor for a Paper Extension: 10 Steps

    2. Show evidence if you say you are sick. A serious illness, like the flu, is a reasonable cause to ask for an extension. You don't have to go into great detail about your illness; most professors won't want to hear about this. Be aware that some professors to ask for a doctor's note or other evidence, evident. [2]

  10. How To Write an Email For Extension Of Assignment

    Greeting: Address the recipient respectfully, using proper salutations such as "Dear Professor [Last Name].". Introduction: Briefly introduce yourself and provide context for your email. Explain the assignment you're seeking an extension for, including the due date. Reason for Extension: Clearly and honestly explain why you need an extension.

  11. 5 Ways to Write a Letter Asking for an Extension

    1. Write the letter as soon as you can. As soon as you know you will need an extension, immediately begin preparing your letter. You need to give the recipient as much time as possible to make a decision about your situation. You also want to appear prepared, despite asking for an adjustment to the schedule. [6] 2.

  12. How To Ask For An Extension On An Assignment

    Sample 2: How To Ask For An Extension On An Assignment. Subject: Request for Extension on Assignment. Dear [Professor's Name], I am writing to request an extension on the [Assignment Name] that is currently due on [Due Date]. I have been facing some personal challenges that have made it difficult for me to complete the assignment on time.

  13. Seeking Deadline Extension: Polite Email to Professor [EXAMPLE]

    However, unforeseen circumstances have arisen recently that have made it challenging for me to meet the original deadline for this particular assignment. 5. State the reason for the extension. Coming to the meat of the email - the reason for the extension. This is the section that will get maximum attention.

  14. The Best Way To Ask For An Extension On An Assignment

    Even if you're ready to request an extension, you may still be at a loss as to what to say. An email to your professor is probably your best bet. Be polite, explain that you're requesting an extension, give your reason why, and offer your proposed new deadline. Short and sweet is perfect; no need to try to embellish!

  15. Reasons for requesting an extension

    Body Suitable reasons for requesting extensions. Good reasons for coursework extensions are unexpected short-term circumstances which are exceptional for the individual student, beyond that student's control, and which could reasonably be expected to have had an adverse impact on the student's ability to complete the assessment on time.

  16. Extensions: What They Mean and When to Ask for Them

    Extensions: What They Mean and When to Ask for Them; Extensions: What They Mean and When to Ask for Them. Requesting an extension from your instructor or professor can be intimidating. You might worry it will make you look irresponsible or that they will doubt your reasons. Before you ask for an extension on an assignment, check this article out.

  17. Professor shares secrets on getting an extension (w/ template)

    Example of how to ask for an extension by email. I have an email template below to help you write an excellent email to your professor asking for an extension. This can also work for makeup exams and assignments too. Just remember to be honest and alter the email to fit your personal circumstances.

  18. 13 No-Fail Ways to Get an Extension on a Paper

    From finding plausible excuses to being the teacher's pet, here are 13 no-fail ways to get an extension on a paper. 13. Be upfront about it. This is the only option when you really can't offer a ...

  19. Reasons and evidence for requesting a coursework extension or IMC

    IMC claims require evidence. Evidence provides confirmation of what happened, when. It also helps to provide clarity about your circumstances and how they affected your assessment performance. Requests for a coursework extension will normally require evidence to support it. Please confirm with the relevant department if this is the case for ...

  20. Need to Ask for an Extension on an Assignment? Try This

    Here's what you can do if you find yourself in this situation. 1. Ask in Advance. Requesting an extension the night before your paper is due will show you lack forward thinking. It may look like you forgot about the assignment until now — which is not a good reason for needing an extension. Whatever reasons you do give will appear disingenuous.

  21. What's a good reason for an extension request on a university assignment?

    If you are diagnosed with ADHD just inform your professor of this, and request an accommodation in the form of an extension. Perfectly reasonable. It is understandable that you are hesitant to disclose your mental health struggles, but it is important to remember that universities have resources and accommodations available to support students ...