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How to Introduce a Journal Article in an Essay

Last Updated: February 9, 2024

This article was co-authored by Noah Taxis and by wikiHow staff writer, Jennifer Mueller, JD . Noah Taxis is an English Teacher based in San Francisco, California. He has taught as a credentialed teacher for over four years: first at Mountain View High School as a 9th- and 11th-grade English Teacher, then at UISA (Ukiah Independent Study Academy) as a Middle School Independent Study Teacher. He is now a high school English teacher at St. Ignatius College Preparatory School in San Francisco. He received an MA in Secondary Education and Teaching from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education. He also received an MA in Comparative and World Literature from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and a BA in International Literary & Visual Studies and English from Tufts University. This article has been viewed 34,876 times.

Using a journal article in your essay can add to your credibility and make your points more persuasive. When you introduce an article to your readers, you help them understand why you're using it as a source. We've gathered a number of different ways you can introduce the journal article and transition between your thoughts and those of the other author. Pick the one that works best for you and your personal writing style.

List the title and the author.

An excerpt from an essay that mentions a journal article, with the title and the author of the article highlighted.

  • For example, you might write: "Albus Dumbledore describes the origin of the four Hogwarts houses in his article 'Separating Hogwarts Fact and Fiction.'"
  • Put the title of the article in double-quotation marks in your text. [1] X Research source
  • If you're quoting directly from the source, include the author's full name the first time you quote them. [2] X Research source

Summarize the article.

Use a summary if you only need the main point of the article.

  • For example, you might write: "The history of Hogwarts makes clear that the houses were never intended to be seen as 'good' or 'evil.' Rather, each house emphasizes and nurtures specific traits students have—how they use those traits is up to them."
  • Paraphrasing from the article is similar to summarizing. However, when you summarize, you're covering the entire article in a sentence or two. A paraphrase typically only covers a small portion of the article.

Provide any necessary background.

Explain how the author or the article is important with background info.

  • For example, you might write: "Professor Slughorn was one of the longest-serving teachers at Hogwarts, schooling generations of students in potions until his retirement."
  • You might also include some background if the author of the article is controversial or the article's conclusions have been seriously questioned. If you're doing this, go on to explain why you're using the article in your essay.

Explain the purpose of the source in your essay.

Try this if you need to justify using the source.

  • For example, you might write: "Although this essay doesn't discuss defenses against the dark arts, Gilderoy Lockhart's article provides an example of how you can't learn anything by plagiarizing the work of others."

Frame the source in the context of your own essay.

This is a good option if the article supports your own ideas.

  • For example, you might write: "This article demonstrates broad support for the idea that Hogwarts should continue to sort students into four houses."

Add a signal phrase to distinguish ideas from the source.

Go with signals to make a simple transition.

  • For example, you might write: "McGonagall argues that Slytherin House should be disbanded after the Battle of Hogwarts."

Discuss the source's limitations.

Include limitations if the source is an opposing viewpoint.

  • For example, you might write: "While McGonagall makes a compelling argument that Slytherin House should be disbanded, she was biased by her experiences. In this essay, I will show that the personality traits emphasized by Slytherin are positive traits that can be used for good."

Expert Q&A

  • Remember to include an in-text citation for the source if required by your citation guide. You'll also need an entry for the source in your reference list at the end of your paper. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • In an academic essay, you typically introduce a journal article in the first sentence of a paragraph. Then, use the sentences that follow to show how the material from the article relates to the rest of your essay. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

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Thanks for reading our article! If you’d like to learn more about academic writing, check out our in-depth interview with Noah Taxis .

  • ↑ https://rasmussen.libanswers.com/faq/32501
  • ↑ https://www.ursinus.edu/live/files/1160-integrating-quotespdf
  • ↑ https://www.una.edu/writingcenter/docs/Writing-Resources/Source%20Integration.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.stetson.edu/other/writing-center/media/Handout%20-%20Incorporating%20Sources%20Effectively.pdf

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How to Write an Academic Essay with References and Citations

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Written by  Scribendi

If you're wondering how to write an academic essay with references, look no further. In this article, we'll discuss how to use in-text citations and references, including how to cite a website, how to cite a book, and how to cite a Tweet, according to various style guides.

How to Cite a Website

You might need to cite sources when writing a paper that references other sources. For example, when writing an essay, you may use information from other works, such as books, articles, or websites. You must then inform readers where this information came from. Failure to do so, even accidentally, is plagiarism—passing off another person's work as your own.

You can avoid plagiarism and show readers where to find information by using citations and references. 

Citations tell readers where a piece of information came from. They take the form of footnotes, endnotes, or parenthetical elements, depending on your style guide. In-text citations are usually placed at the end of a sentence containing the relevant information. 

A reference list , bibliography, or works cited list at the end of a text provides additional details about these cited sources. This list includes enough publication information allowing readers to look up these sources themselves.

Referencing is important for more than simply avoiding plagiarism. Referring to a trustworthy source shows that the information is reliable. Referring to reliable information can also support your major points and back up your argument. 

Learning how to write an academic essay with references and how to use in-text citations will allow you to cite authors who have made similar arguments. This helps show that your argument is objective and not entirely based on personal biases.

How Do You Determine Which Style Guide to Use?

How to Write an Academic Essay with References

Often, a professor will assign a style guide. The purpose of a style guide is to provide writers with formatting instructions. If your professor has not assigned a style guide, they should still be able to recommend one. 

If you are entirely free to choose, pick one that aligns with your field (for example, APA is frequently used for scientific writing). 

Some of the most common style guides are as follows:

AP style for journalism

Chicago style for publishing

APA style for scholarly writing (commonly used in scientific fields)

MLA style for scholarly citations (commonly used in English literature fields)

Some journals have their own style guides, so if you plan to publish, check which guide your target journal uses. You can do this by locating your target journal's website and searching for author guidelines.

How Do You Pick Your Sources?

When learning how to write an academic essay with references, you must identify reliable sources that support your argument. 

As you read, think critically and evaluate sources for:

Objectivity

Keep detailed notes on the sources so that you can easily find them again, if needed.

Tip: Record these notes in the format of your style guide—your reference list will then be ready to go.

How to Use In-Text Citations in MLA

An in-text citation in MLA includes the author's last name and the relevant page number: 

(Author 123)

How to Cite a Website in MLA

How to Cite a Website in MLA

Here's how to cite a website in MLA:

Author's last name, First name. "Title of page."

Website. Website Publisher, date. Web. Date

retrieved. <URL>

With information from a real website, this looks like:

Morris, Nancy. "How to Cite a Tweet in APA,

Chicago, and MLA." Scribendi. Scribendi

Inc., n.d. Web. 22 Dec. 2021.

<https://www.scribendi.com/academy/articles/how_to_cite_a_website.en.html>

How Do You Cite a Tweet in MLA ?

MLA uses the full text of a short Tweet (under 140 characters) as its title. Longer Tweets can be shortened using ellipses. 

MLA Tweet references should be formatted as follows:

@twitterhandle (Author Name). "Text of Tweet." Twitter, Date Month, Year, time of

publication, URL.

With information from an actual Tweet, this looks like:

@neiltyson (Neil deGrasse Tyson). "You can't use reason to convince anyone out of an

argument that they didn't use reason to get into." Twitter, 29 Sept. 2020, 10:15 p.m.,

https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/1311127369785192449 .

How to Cite a Book in MLA

Here's how to cite a book in MLA:

Author's last name, First name. Book Title. Publisher, Year.

With publication information from a real book, this looks like:

Montgomery, L.M. Rainbow Valley. Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1919.

How to Cite a Chapter in a Book in MLA

Author's last name, First name. "Title of Chapter." Book Title , edited by Editor Name,

Publisher, Year, pp. page range.

With publication information from an actual book, this looks like:

Ezell, Margaret J.M. "The Social Author: Manuscript Culture, Writers, and Readers." The

Broadview Reader in Book History , edited by Michelle Levy and Tom Mole, Broadview

Press, 2015,pp. 375–394.

How to  Cite a Paraphrase in MLA

You can cite a paraphrase in MLA exactly the same way as you would cite a direct quotation. 

Make sure to include the author's name (either in the text or in the parenthetical citation) and the relevant page number.

How to Use In-Text Citations in APA

In APA, in-text citations include the author's last name and the year of publication; a page number is included only if a direct quotation is used: 

(Author, 2021, p. 123)

How to Cite a Website in APA

Here's how to cite a website in APA:

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year, Month. date of publication). Title of page. https://URL

Morris, N. (n.d.). How to cite a Tweet in APA, Chicago, and MLA. 

https://www.scribendi.com/academy/articles/how_to_cite_a_website.en.html       

Tip: Learn more about how to write an academic essay with  references to websites .

How Do You  Cite a Tweet in APA ?

APA refers to Tweets using their first 20 words. 

Tweet references should be formatted as follows:

Author, A. A. [@twitterhandle). (Year, Month. date of publication). First 20 words of the

Tweet. [Tweet] Twitter. URL

When we input information from a real Tweet, this looks like:

deGrasse Tyson, N. [@neiltyson]. (2020, Sept. 29). You can't use reason to convince anyone

out of an argument that they didn't use reason to get into. [Tweet] Twitter.

https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/1311127369785192449

How to Cite a Book in APA

How to Cite a Book in APA

Here's how to cite a book in APA:   

Author, A. A. (Year). Book title. Publisher.

For a real book, this looks like:

Montgomery, L. M. (1919). Rainbow valley.

Frederick A. Stokes Company.

How to Cite a Chapter in a Book in APA

Author, A. A. (Year). Chapter title. In Editor Name (Ed.), Book Title (pp. page range).

With information from a real book, this looks like:

Ezell, M. J. M. (2014). The social author: Manuscript culture, writers, and readers. In

Michelle Levy and Tom Mole (Eds.), The Broadview Reader in Book History (pp. 375–

394). Broadview Press.

Knowing how to cite a book and how to cite a chapter in a book correctly will take you a long way in creating an effective reference list.

How to Cite a Paraphrase

How to Cite a Paraphrase in APA

You can cite a paraphrase in APA the same way as you would cite a direct quotation, including the author's name and year of publication. 

In APA, you may also choose to pinpoint the page from which the information is taken.

Referencing is an essential part of academic integrity. Learning how to write an academic essay with references and how to use in-text citations shows readers that you did your research and helps them locate your sources.

Learning how to cite a website, how to cite a book, and how to cite a paraphrase can also help you avoid plagiarism —an academic offense with serious consequences for your education or professional reputation.

Scribendi can help format your citations or review your whole paper with our Academic Editing services .

Take Your Essay from Good to Great

Hire an expert academic editor , or get a free sample, about the author.

Scribendi Editing and Proofreading

Scribendi's in-house editors work with writers from all over the globe to perfect their writing. They know that no piece of writing is complete without a professional edit, and they love to see a good piece of writing transformed into a great one. Scribendi's in-house editors are unrivaled in both experience and education, having collectively edited millions of words and obtained numerous degrees. They love consuming caffeinated beverages, reading books of various genres, and relaxing in quiet, dimly lit spaces.

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Quoting and integrating sources into your paper

In any study of a subject, people engage in a “conversation” of sorts, where they read or listen to others’ ideas, consider them with their own viewpoints, and then develop their own stance. It is important in this “conversation” to acknowledge when we use someone else’s words or ideas. If we didn’t come up with it ourselves, we need to tell our readers who did come up with it.

It is important to draw on the work of experts to formulate your own ideas. Quoting and paraphrasing the work of authors engaged in writing about your topic adds expert support to your argument and thesis statement. You are contributing to a scholarly conversation with scholars who are experts on your topic with your writing. This is the difference between a scholarly research paper and any other paper: you must include your own voice in your analysis and ideas alongside scholars or experts.

All your sources must relate to your thesis, or central argument, whether they are in agreement or not. It is a good idea to address all sides of the argument or thesis to make your stance stronger. There are two main ways to incorporate sources into your research paper.

Quoting is when you use the exact words from a source. You will need to put quotation marks around the words that are not your own and cite where they came from. For example:

“It wasn’t really a tune, but from the first note the beast’s eyes began to droop . . . Slowly the dog’s growls ceased – it tottered on its paws and fell to its knees, then it slumped to the ground, fast asleep” (Rowling 275).

Follow these guidelines when opting to cite a passage:

  • Choose to quote passages that seem especially well phrased or are unique to the author or subject matter.
  • Be selective in your quotations. Avoid over-quoting. You also don’t have to quote an entire passage. Use ellipses (. . .) to indicate omitted words. Check with your professor for their ideal length of quotations – some professors place word limits on how much of a sentence or paragraph you should quote.
  • Before or after quoting a passage, include an explanation in which you interpret the significance of the quote for the reader. Avoid “hanging quotes” that have no context or introduction. It is better to err on the side of your reader not understanding your point until you spell it out for them, rather than assume readers will follow your thought process exactly.
  • If you are having trouble paraphrasing (putting something into your own words), that may be a sign that you should quote it.
  • Shorter quotes are generally incorporated into the flow of a sentence while longer quotes may be set off in “blocks.” Check your citation handbook for quoting guidelines.

Paraphrasing is when you state the ideas from another source in your own words . Even when you use your own words, if the ideas or facts came from another source, you need to cite where they came from. Quotation marks are not used. For example:

With the simple music of the flute, Harry lulled the dog to sleep (Rowling 275).

Follow these guidelines when opting to paraphrase a passage:

  • Don’t take a passage and change a word here or there. You must write out the idea in your own words. Simply changing a few words from the original source or restating the information exactly using different words is considered plagiarism .
  • Read the passage, reflect upon it, and restate it in a way that is meaningful to you within the context of your paper . You are using this to back up a point you are making, so your paraphrased content should be tailored to that point specifically.
  • After reading the passage that you want to paraphrase, look away from it, and imagine explaining the main point to another person.
  • After paraphrasing the passage, go back and compare it to the original. Are there any phrases that have come directly from the original source? If so, you should rephrase it or put the original in quotation marks. If you cannot state an idea in your own words, you should use the direct quotation.

A summary is similar to paraphrasing, but used in cases where you are trying to give an overview of many ideas. As in paraphrasing, quotation marks are not used, but a citation is still necessary. For example:

Through a combination of skill and their invisibility cloak, Harry, Ron, and Hermione slipped through Hogwarts to the dog’s room and down through the trapdoor within (Rowling 271-77).

Important guidelines

When integrating a source into your paper, remember to use these three important components:

  • Introductory phrase to the source material : mention the author, date, or any other relevant information when introducing a quote or paraphrase.
  • Source material : a direct quote, paraphrase, or summary with proper citation.
  • Analysis of source material : your response, interpretations, or arguments regarding the source material should introduce or follow it. When incorporating source material into your paper, relate your source and analysis back to your original thesis.

Ideally, papers will contain a good balance of direct quotations, paraphrasing and your own thoughts. Too much reliance on quotations and paraphrasing can make it seem like you are only using the work of others and have no original thoughts on the topic.

Always properly cite an author’s original idea, whether you have directly quoted or paraphrased it. If you have questions about how to cite properly in your chosen citation style, browse these citation guides . You can also review our guide to understanding plagiarism .

University Writing Center

The University of Nevada, Reno Writing Center provides helpful guidance on quoting and paraphrasing and explains how to make sure your paraphrasing does not veer into plagiarism. If you have any questions about quoting or paraphrasing, or need help at any point in the writing process, schedule an appointment with the Writing Center.

Works Cited

Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.  A.A. Levine Books, 1998.

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Using Sources Correctly

Crediting and Citing Your Sources

a photograph of the stacks at the Old Library of Trinity College in Dublin

Now that you’ve just summarized or paraphrased or directly quoted a source, is there anything else you need to do with that source? Well, it turns out there is. There are some standard ways of using sources that let your readers know this material is from other texts rather than original ideas from your own brain. Following these guidelines also allows us, your readers, to locate those sources if we are interested in the topic and would like to know more about what they say.

 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Giving credit to the sources you used creating a text is important (and useful!) for several reasons.

  • It adds to your own credibility as an author by showing you have done appropriate research on your topic and approached your work ethically.
  • It gives credit to the original author and their work for the ideas you found to be useful, and in giving them credit it helps you avoid unintentionally plagiarizing their work.
  • It gives your readers additional resources (already curated by you in your research process!) that they can go to if they want to read further your topic.

What Does It Mean to Credit or Cite Your Sources?

For college-level work, this generally means two things: in-text or parenthetical citation and a “Works Cited” or “References” page. What these two things look like will be a little different for different types of classes (for example, it’s likely your writing class will use MLA—Modern Language Association—format, while a psychology class is more likely to use APA—American Psychological Association—format). The specific details required and the order in which they appear changes a little between different formats, but practicing one of them will give you a general idea of what most of them are looking for. All of the information we are looking at here is specific to MLA, which is the format you will use for your writing classes (and some other humanities classes).

Citing: Identifying In-Text Sources

Once you have brought source material into your writing (via quotation, summary, or paraphrase), your next task is to cite or identify it. This is essential because giving credit to the creator of the source material helps you avoid plagiarism. Identifying your sources also helps your reader understand which written content is from a source and which represents your ideas.

When you cite or identify source materials, you make it absolutely clear that the material was taken from a source. Note that if you don’t do that, your reader is left to assume the words are yours—and since that isn’t true, you will have committed plagiarism.

In-Text Citation

Every time you use an idea or language from a source in your text (so every time you summarize, paraphrase, or directly quote material from a source), you will want to add an in-text citation. Sometimes you can accomplish this simply by mentioning the author or title of a source in the body of your writing, but other times you’ll handle in-text citation differently, with a parenthetical citation. Parenthetical means that the citation appears in parentheses in the text of your essay.

A starting point for parenthetical citations is that they include the author’s last name and the page number where the borrowed information came from. For example, let’s say I’m using material from an article written by Lisa Smith. It’s in a physical magazine and spans pages 38-42. If, on page 41, she says something like, “While most studies have shown that Expo dry erase markers have superior lasting power, erasability, and color saturation than other brands on the market, their higher cost is a concern for some consumers,” I might incorporate that into a paper like this:

By most measurable standards, Expo markers are clearly the favored option (Smith 41).

However, you don’t always need both components (last name and page number) in the parenthetical citation. If I introduced the source material in the sentence above a little differently, introducing the author before delivering the material, I wouldn’t need to repeat the author’s name in that same sentence in the parenthetical citation. In that case, my sentence would look something like this: According to Lisa Smith, Expo markers are clearly the favored option by most measurable standards (41).

In this section, we’ll discuss three ways to cite or identify written source materials in your own writing.

1. Introduce the Author and/or the Title of the Source

By introducing the author or the material, you make it clear to the reader that what you’re talking about is from a source. Here’s an example of a quotation that is identified by introducing the author and the title of source (which are highlighted):

In the article, “Grooming Poodles for Fun and Profit,” Jonas Fogbottom explains , “Poodle grooming is a labor of love. It takes years of practice to be good at it, but once learned, it’s a fun and worthwhile career.”

Here’s an example of a paraphrase that is identified in the same way:

In the article, “Grooming Poodles for Fun and Profit,” Jonas Fogbottom says that although it takes a long time to become a skilled poodle groomer, it’s well worth the effort and leads to a good career.

Note that, in the example above, (1) if there are no page numbers to cite and (2) if the name of the author is signaled in the phrase that introduces the bit of source material, then there is no need for the parenthetical citation. This is an example of a situation where mentioning the author by name is the only in-text citation you’ll need. And sometimes, if the name of the author is unknown, then you might just mention the title of the article instead. It will be up to you, as a writer, to choose which method works best for your given situation.

The first time that you mention a source in your writing, you should always introduce the speaker and, if possible, the title of the source as well. Note that the speaker is the person responsible for stating the information that you’re citing and that this is not always the author of the text. For example, an author of an article might quote someone else, and you might quote or paraphrase that person.

Use the speaker’s full name (e.g. “According to Jonas Fogbottom . . .”) the first time you introduce them; if you mention them again in the paper, use their last name only (e.g. “Fogbottom goes on to discuss . . .”).

2. Use Linking or Attributive Language

Using linking language (sometimes called attributive language or signal phrases) simply means using words that show the reader you are still talking about a source that you just mentioned.

For example, you might use linking language that looks something like this:

  • The author also explains . . .
  • Fogbottom continues . . .
  • The article goes on to say . . .
  • The data set also demonstrates . . .

By using this kind of language, you make it clear to the reader that you’re still talking about a source. And while you’ll use this type of language throughout any researched essay whether you’re also using parenthetical citations or not, as we mentioned above, sometimes this linking language will be all you need for in-text citation.

Let’s look back at the last Fogbottom example from above, and imagine you wanted to add two more sentences from the same source. The linking language is highlighted :

In the article, “Grooming Poodles for Fun and Profit,” Jonas Fogbottom says that although it takes a long time to become a skilled poodle groomer, it’s well worth the effort and leads to a good career. Fogbottom goes on to explain how one is trained in the art of dog and poodle grooming. The article also gives a set of resources for people who want to know more about a dog grooming career.

Using the linking language makes it absolutely clear to your reader that you are still talking about a source.

3. Use a Parenthetical Citation

A parenthetical citation is a citation enclosed within parentheses.

the words "pro tip" in a speech bubble

The classic parenthetical citation includes the author’s name and, if there is one, a page number. To learn more about parenthetical citation and see some examples, see the Purdue OWL article on “ MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics ” (available from owl.english.purdue.edu).

Here’s an example :

(Fogbottom 16)

If there are two authors , list both (with a page number, if available):

(Smith and Jones 24)

If there are three or more authors , list the first author only and add “et al.”* (with a page number, if available):

(Smith et al. 62)

* et al means “and others.” If a text or source has three or more authors, MLA style has us just list the first one with et al .

But my source doesn’t have page numbers!

If you are using an electronic source or another kind of source with no page numbers, just leave the page number out:

(Fogbottom)

If you’re quoting or paraphrasing someone who was cited by the author of one of your sources , then that’s handled a bit differently. For example, what if you quote Smith, but you found that quote in the article by Fogbottom. In this case, you should introduce the speaker (Smith) as described above, and then cite the source for the quote, like this:

(qtd. in Fogbottom)

But my source doesn’t have an author!

This happens sometimes. Many useful documents, like government publications, organizational reports, and surveys, don’t list their authors. On the other hand, sometimes no clearly listed author can be a red flag that a source is not entirely trustworthy or is not researched well enough to be a reliable source for you.

If you encounter a source with no author, do look for other indicators that it is a good (or poor) source—who published it, does it have an appropriate list of references, is it current information, is it unbiased?

If you determine that this source is an appropriate source to use, then, when you create your in-text citation for it, you will simply use the title of the source (article, chapter, graph, film, etc.) in the place where you would have used the author’s name. If the title is long, you should abbreviate by listing the first one or two words of it (with a page number, if available).

Let’s imagine you’re working with a newspaper article entitled, “What’s New in Technology,” enclosed in quotation marks to indicate that this is an article title, and with no known author . Here’s what that would look in a parenthetical citation:

(“What’s New” B6)

If there is no author and you’re working with an electronic article, use the first one or two words in your parenthetical citation, again, enclosed in quotation marks. Let’s imagine you’re working with a web article entitled, “Pie Baking for Fun and Profit” and with no author. Here’s what that would look in a parenthetical citation:

(“Pie Baking”)

The parenthetical citation should be added at the end of the sentence that contains the source material. Let’s go back to the Fogbottom example and see how a parenthetical citation would work:

“Poodle grooming is a labor of love. It takes years of practice to be good at it, but once learned, it’s a fun and worthwhile career” (Fogbottom).

Here’s what it would look like if we used it with a paraphrase instead of a quotation:

Although it takes a long time to become a skilled poodle groomer, it’s well worth the effort and leads to a good career (Fogbottom).

Note that the citation is placed at the end of the sentence; the period comes after the parentheses. Misplacing the period is one of the most common formatting errors made by students.

Using parenthetical citation makes it crystal clear that a sentence comes from source material. This is, by far, the easiest way to cite or identify your source materials, too.

If using parenthetical citations is easy, why would we bother with using introduction or linking language to identify sources?

Good question! There would be nothing wrong with only using parenthetical citations all the way through your writing—it would absolutely do the job of citing the material. But, it wouldn’t read smoothly and would feel somewhat rough because every time a parenthetical citation popped up, the reader would be “stopped” in place for a moment. Using a combination of introduction, linking language, and parenthetical citation, as needed, makes the writing smoother and easier to read. It also integrates the source material with the writer’s ideas. We call this synthesis, and it’s part of the craft of writing.

Works Cited Entries

At the end of texts that have drawn from existing sources, you will often find a Works Cited page. This page gives more information than the parenthetical citations do about what kinds of sources were referenced in this work and where they can be found if the reader would like to know more about them. These entries all follow a specific and consistent format so that it is easy for readers to find the information they are looking for and so the shape and type of that information is consistent no matter who is writing the entries.

Until recently, the MLA required a slightly different format for every type of source—an entry for a Youtube video required certain information that was different from an entry for a book that was different from an entry for an online article. The most recent version of MLA, though—MLA 8—has simplified this so there is just one format rather than many.

You can learn how to create works cited entries in MLA 8 format, and see an example, in the “ Creating a Works Cited Page ” appendix to this text.

The Word on College Reading and Writing Copyright © by Carol Burnell, Jaime Wood, Monique Babin, Susan Pesznecker, and Nicole Rosevear is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Home / Guides / Citation Guides / Harvard Referencing / Harvard Referencing Style Examples / How to reference an article in Harvard referencing style

How to reference an article in Harvard referencing style

What is an article.

Almost all writers and academics reference other people’s writing in their works. Referencing demonstrates that you have researched your topic, are well versed in its arguments and theories, and it also helps avoid charges of plagiarism.  

The Harvard citation system is just one of many referencing styles – and which style you choose is normally guided by the institution or publication you are writing for.

In this article, you will learn how to use the Harvard citation system to reference the following types of articles:

  • journal article
  • newspaper article
  • magazine article

Properly citing article details in the reference list will help the readers to locate your source material if they wish to read more about a particular area or topic.

Information you need:

  • Author name
  • (Year published)  
  • ‘Article title’  
  • Journal/newspaper/magazine name  
  • Day and month published, if available
  • Volume number, if available
  • (Issue) number, if available
  • Page number(s), if available

If accessed online:

  • Available at: URL or DOI  
  • (Accessed: date).

Journal articles

Academic or scholarly journals are periodical publications about a specific discipline. No matter what your field is, if you are writing an academic paper, you will inevitably have to cite a journal article in your research. Journal articles often have multiple authors, so make sure you know when to use et al. in Harvard style . The method for referencing a journal article in the reference list is as follows:

Reference list (print) structure:

Last name, F. (Year published) ‘Article title’, Journal name , Volume(Issue), Page(s).

Shepherd, V. (2020) ‘An exploration around peer support for secondary pupils in Scotland with experience of self-harm’, Educational Psychology in Practice, 36(3), pp. 297-312.

Note that the article title uses sentence case. However, the title of the journal uses title case. Additionally, the volume number comes immediately after the journal title followed by the issue number in round brackets.

If the original material you are referencing was accessed online, then the method for citing it in the reference list will be the same as that in print, but with an additional line at the end.  

Reference list (online) structure:

Last name, F. (Year published) ‘Article title’, Journal Name , Volume(Issue), Page(s). Available at: URL or DOI (Accessed: date).  

Shepherd, V. (2020) ‘An exploration around peer support for secondary pupils in Scotland with experience of self-harm’, Educational Psychology in Practice, 36(3), pp. 297-312. Available at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02667363.2020.1772726 (Accessed: 08 October 2020).

In-text citation (print or online) structure:

In-text citations are written within round brackets and start with the last name of the author followed by the year published, both separated by a comma.

You can also mention the author within the text and only include the publication year in round brackets.

Examples:  

In this article (Shepherd, 2020) deals with…  

According to Shepherd (2020), when peer support is available…  

Talking about the secondary education system, Shepherd (2020, p.299) suggests that…

Newspaper articles

Even if you are referring to an incident which is public knowledge, you still need to cite the source.  

The name of the author in a newspaper article is referred to as a byline. Below are examples for citing an article both with and without a byline.  

Reference list (print) structure:  

Last name, F. (Year published). ‘Article title’, Newspaper name , Day Month, Page(s).

Hamilton, J. (2018). ‘Massive fire at local department store’, The Daily Local, 10 August, p. 1.

Last name, F. (Year published). ‘Article title’, Newspaper name , Day Month, Page(s). Available at: URL (Accessed: Day Month Year).

Gambino, L. (2020) ‘Kamala Harris and Mike Pence clash over coronavirus response in vice-presidential debate,’ The Guardian, 8 October. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/oct/07/debate-kamala-harris-mike-pence-latest-news (Accessed: 8 October 2020).

Reference list structure, no byline:

The basic reference list structure for the reference is the same for both print and online articles. If information isn’t available, simply omit it from the reference.

Newspaper name (Year published) ‘Article Title’, Day Month, Page(s). Available at: URL (Accessed: Day Month Year).

The Chronicler (2016) ‘Local man wins lottery jackpot twice in one year’, 30 May, p. 14. Available at: https://thechroniclerpaper.com/local-man-wins-lottery-twice (Accessed: 1 October 2020).

In-text citation structure (print or online):

The last name of the author and date are written in round brackets, separated by a comma. The method is similar to referencing journal articles in in-text citations.

(Hamilton, 2018)

In his paper, Gambino (2020) mentioned that…

For articles accessed online which do not have an author, the name of the publication is mentioned in place of the author’s name and is italicized.

( The Chronicler , 2016)

Magazine articles  

The structure of magazine articles is similar to that of a journal article.

Last name, F. (Year published) ‘Article title’, Magazine Name , Volume(Issue), Page(s).

Ornes, S. (2020). “To save Appalachia’s endangered mussels, scientists hatched a bold plan”, ScienceNews, (198), p.2.

Last name, F. (Year published) ‘Article title’, Magazine name , Volume(Issue), Page(s). Available at: URL (Accessed: Date).

Ornes, S. (2020) ‘To save Appalachia’s endangered mussels, scientists hatched a bold plan’, ScienceNews, (198), p.2. Available at: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/endangered-mussels-appalachia-rivers-biologists-conservation-plan (Accessed: 3 October 2020).

  In-text citation (print or online) structure:

(Author last name, Year published)

(Ornes, 2020)

Published October 29, 2020.

Harvard Formatting Guide

Harvard Formatting

  • et al Usage
  • Direct Quotes
  • In-text Citations
  • Multiple Authors
  • Page Numbers
  • Writing an Outline
  • View Harvard Guide

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How do I incorporate academic sources into my paper?

Return to Student Resources

Sources are an important part of any paper

Whether you are referencing a primary text from your class or a secondary text that supports your argument, sources lend credibility to your ideas and give your reader the impression that you are trustworthy; knowledgeable; and experienced when it comes to your topic. There are a variety of ways to include sources in your paper:

Involves selecting a brief excerpt from a source in order to enhance your own argument.

  • When quoting, you may not insert words to alter the meaning of the quote or take the quote out of its original context, and you must properly credit the source in your paper and provide a full citation at the end of your work.
  • If you make a slight alteration to a quote in order to ensure that it is grammatically coherent with your overall sentence, you must offset any  change with the use of brackets [ ], and if you skip over any part of a quote, you must note it with an ellipsis ( . . . ) so the reader knows you made an adjustment.

Paraphrasing:

Involves the detailed explanation of a source's ideas in your own words.

  • Successful paraphrasing means using your own words to convey an idea and presenting that idea with a sentence structure that is your own, not the author's.  In addition, you must still cite the author and the pages you are paraphrasing.

Summarizing:

Involves a concise account of an author's overall claims.

  • This integration of a source is meant to demonstrate you are familiar with an author's central ideas. Again, summarizing requires an acknowledgment of an author's name and work but might not require a page number if it is addressing a writer's ideas at large.

Still Have Questions:

  • The Writing Center's guide to avoiding plagiarism:  Paraphrasing and Citation
  • Source incorporation handout:  Introducing Arguments  [pdf]

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The Correct Way to Write an Article Title in a Paper

It is a cardinal rule to cite scholarly sources when writing a paper. Most professors will specify the approximate number of sources for a paper, essay, or assignment. A well-written academic paper is objective and has references or works cited page where you list the references used. However, how do you write the title of an article when writing a paper?

When you mention an online or magazine article in your essay, do not just do it as you please. There is a formula you need to follow depending on the referencing style. This post looks at how to title an article in an essay following the APA, Harvard, MLA, and Chicago.

Let’s commence.

How to Title an Article in APA

APA stands for American Psychological Association. The association published the first APA stylebook in the late 1920s. Over the years, the stylebook has been widely adopted beyond psychology. It has also been updated many times. The stylebook meticulously describes how to format every aspect of your essay.

Whenever you mention the name of a source in an APA essay, there are rules you need to follow. This is true for all sources, including articles, books, webpages, reports, chapters, etc.

The rules you need to follow depend on the type of source (standalone source or part of a greater thing). For some sources, you simply capitalize and italicize the main words; for others, you have to capitalize the main words and put them in double quotation marks.

You need to italicize and capitalize their names when you mention standalone sources. Standalone sources include a podcast, a TV series, a dissertation, a movie, and an e-book.

Examples showing how to write larger works in APA

  • Morbid: A True Crime Podcast (podcast title)
  • The Last of Us (TV series title)
  • Canadian Legal System Versus US Legal System: A Comparative Study (dissertation title)
  • The Pirates of the Caribbean (movie title)
  • For a Dollar and a Dream: State Lotteries in Modern America (e-book title)

On the other hand, when you mention sources that are part of a greater work, you need to capitalize them and put them in double quotation marks. Examples of these sources include a magazine article, a newspaper article, a blog post, and a journal article. This means mentioning any article must capitalize its title and put it in double quotations.

Examples showing how to write article titles in APA

  • “Study of Correlation between Criminality and Population” (journal article title)
  • “Effective Active Ingredients Obtained through Biotechnology” (journal article title)
  • “Doping in Cycling: Everything You Need to Know” (magazine article title)
  • “Do you know what is in Your Cosmetics?” (newspaper article title)
  • “35 Best Ways to Make Money Online in 2023” (blog post title)

Titling an article in a Harvard Style Format Paper or Essay

The Harvard referencing system was invented late in the nineteenth century by a Harvard University professor. The system has been widely adopted beyond the lecture halls of Harvard. It is popularly used to reference various works in the following fields: philosophy, behavioral sciences, and humanities.

When you name or mention an article in a Harvard essay, there are rules you must follow. There are rules you need to follow when you mention any work in a Harvard essay.

The rules you need to follow depend mainly on the size of the work. The titles of large works are formatted differently compared to the titles of small works.

Large works include books and journals. When you mention a book or journal in a Harvard essay, you must italicize the entire title and capitalize the major words.

Examples showing how to write large works in Harvard

  • The Lucifer Effect (book title)
  • Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (book title)
  • Games People Play (book title)
  • Comparative Studies in Society and History (journal title)
  • Journal of American History (journal title)

The titles of smaller works are written differently in contrast to the title of large works. They are written by putting them inside single quotation marks.

Smaller works include journal articles, blog posts, web pages, web articles, etc. Whenever you mention these things in your essay, you must put them inside quotes.

Examples showing how to write smaller works in Harvard

  • ‘Sex, Military Brothels, and Gender Violence during the Italian Campaign in the USSR, 1941-3’ (journal article title)
  • ‘Hitler’s Worldview and the Interwar Kulturkamf’ (journal article title)
  • ’10 POC-Owned Advisory Businesses With Insanely Great Marketing’ (blog post title)
  • ‘How to Use Instagram for Your Financial Planning Business’ (blog post title)
  • ‘These 9 Decorative Accessory Trends Are About to Pop Off in Your Group Text’ (web page title)

How to Title an Article in MLA

MLA is an acronym for Modern Language Association. The association started in 1883 to promote the study of modern languages and literature. It published the first stylebook in 1953 and has made major updates to it a number of times. The MLA style is widely used in the following fields: cultural studies, comparative literature, literary criticism, foreign languages, and English studies. It is also used in humanities disciplines.

When you mention an article or any other source in MLA, there are rules you need to follow. The rules largely depend on the type of source you mention.

When you mention a large standalone work (a book, a film, a journal, a website, a magazine, or a movie), you must italicize it and then capitalize all major words. (You should capitalize articles in the middle of the title, prepositions, and coordinating conjunctions.

Examples showing how to write large works in MLA

  • Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies (book title)
  • Literary Theory: An Introduction (book title)
  • Fast Company (magazine title)
  • Library Philosophy and Practice (journal title)
  • Teens Dealing with Death; When Someone Dies: Understanding Grief (movie title)

When you mention a singular article (journal or otherwise) or any other smaller work, you must put it in double quotation marks. No italicizing as in the case of larger works. Examples of smaller works that need to be put in quotes include journal articles, web articles, news articles, book chapters, songs, short stories, TV episodes, magazine articles, and poems.

Examples showing how to write smaller works in MLA

  • “Collaborative writing among young EFL learners in a school context: product and process” (journal article title)
  • “Investigating cohort effects of early foreign language learning” (journal article title)
  • “Studying French is easy: 10 tips to learn French fast” (web article title)
  • “ChatGPT Gets Dartmouth Talking” (news article title)
  • “Do not go gentle into that good night” (poem title)

How to Title an Article in a Chicago Format Essay/Paper

Chicago format is an American English formatting style invented by the University of Chicago in 1906. It is widely used in many academic disciplines (fine arts, history, and business) and book publishing.

When writing an essay according to the Chicago stylebook, you must follow everything recommended in it. How you are supposed to write the title of a journal or a book is not the same way you are supposed to write the title of a journal article or a book chapter.

The Chicago Manual of Style requires you to italicize the title of all standalone works you mention in your essay. Standalone works that you must italicize include journals, books, plays, and so on.

Examples showing how to write the titles of standalone works in Chicago

  • Internal Journal of Art & Design Education (journal-title title)
  • Studies in Art Education (journal title)
  • Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (book title)
  • Rich Dad Poor Dad (book title)
  • Long Day’s Journey Into Night (play title)

The Chicago Manual requires you to enclose the title of short works in double quotation marks. Examples of short works that need to be enclosed include journal articles, magazine articles, news articles, book chapters, etc.

  • “Frank Gehry’s non-trivial drawings as gestures” drawdlings and kinaesthetic approach to architecture” (journal article title)
  • “The Saka ‘Animal Style’ in Context: Material, Technology, Form and Use” (journal article title)
  • “An Abandoned, Industrial Ruin Bursts With New Life in Delaware” (magazine article title)
  • “The Unfinished Business of International Business Tax Reform” (news article title)
  • “The Technologies Behind Bitcoin” (book chapter title)

On a Final Note!

You now know how to format standalone and shorter works in APA, MLA, Harvard, and Chicago. Therefore, when asked to write an essay following any of these formatting styles, you should be able to correctly mention or talk about any article or larger work in your essay.

Try our paper editing service if you need help editing your essay to conform to APA, MLA, Harvard, or Chicago standards. We offer essay editing services at affordable rates. We can edit any work to meet any academic requirements. Check out our other writing and homework help services .

Contact us today for fast and professional assistance.

how to add an article in an essay

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How to Add an Article Title Into the Text Using APA Format

Catherine bowers.

Including an article title in your text with APA format is easy.

Including an article title in the text of your writing serves a different purpose than including it in the Works Cited section of a paper. You may want to include the title of an article in your paper when it is the main subject you’re writing about, a subject you’re discussing that you’re referring to simply as an example, or if the research for your writing isn’t extensive enough to require a citation page. The American Psychological Association (APA) has specific guidelines on how to include an article title in the text of your writing.

Consider section 4.21 of the APA Publication Manual "Use of Italics;" according to it, italics should be used for titles of books, periodicals, films, videos, television shows, and microfilm. Make an exception if words in the title are usually italicized and set them in normal type instead; this is called reverse italicization.

Consider section 4.07 of the APA Publication Manual, “Quotation Marks;” according to it, quotes should be used to set off the title of books, articles, and chapters when you are including it in the text.

Check your writing to make sure you’re following the previous two guidelines; the article you mention in your text should be formatted as follows:

Ms. Bond published her controversial piece, “Housebreaking the Habit” in (italics)Dogfancy(/italics) magazine in June of 2010.

  • 1 “Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed.”; American Psychological Association; 2010

About the Author

In 1998 Catherine Bowers began writing articles for newspapers, including "The Daily Collegian" at Pennsylvania State University. She also edited a Spanish-language journal and wrote product and patent descriptions for inventors. Bowers assists with the Gutenberg Project and graduated from Pennsylvania State with a Bachelor of Arts in English.

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How are the titles of longer works written in mla style, the disadvantages of apa, how to acknowledge poetry in apa references.

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Citing scholarly sources in your writing can help you to support your argument or to tackle counterarguments. Not only do you have to create a page of works cited, but you also have to properly cite those sources in your text by following formatting guides. Modern Language Association and American Psychological Association guidelines are the most-used formatting styles in academic writing, and both have the same rules regarding how to write an article title in a paper: Put quote marks around the title and capitalize the first and last words in the title as well as all other words except articles and prepositions shorter than four letters.

Title Rules

All shorter works such as articles, book chapters, essays and even songs should be in quotation marks when cited in a paper in MLA and APA styles. An example would be: "Article Discussing Effects of Climate Change on Monkeys." If you must include the book or journal where the article is found in your paper, italicize it in both styles. In-text citations are also necessary when listing an article in your paper. For MLA style, an in-text citation includes the author's last name and the page number in parentheses, such as (Bedford 4). For APA style, the in-text citation includes the author's last name, year of publication and page number also in parentheses, such as (Bedford, 1990, p. 4).

  • Purdue Online Writing Lab: MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics
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  • Purdue Online Writing Lab: Reference List: Articles in Periodicals
  • Carson-Newman University: Punctuating Titles: When to Use Italics, Underlining, and Quotation Marks
  • American Psychological Association: How to Capitalize and Format Reference Titles in APA Style

Maria Magher has been working as a professional writer since 2001. She has worked as an ESL teacher, a freshman composition teacher and an education reporter, writing for regional newspapers and online publications. She has written about parenting for Pampers and other websites. She has a Master's degree in English and creative writing.

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How do I actually write the names of the article and the journal/magazine in my paper?

To write the name of a journal/magazine title in the body of your paper:

  • The title of the journal should be in italics - Example:  Journal of the American Medical Association
  • Capitalize all of the major words.

To write the the name of an article title in the body of your paper:

  • The title of the article should be in quotation marks - E xample: "Tiger Woman on Wall Street"

For more information, please see the following pages on the APA Style Blog :

  • Title Case Capitalization
  • Use of Italics
  • Use of Quotation Marks

Thank you for using ASK US.  For more information, please contact your Baker librarians .

  • Last Updated May 05, 2023
  • Views 537497
  • Answered By Baker Librarians

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Comments (8)

  • Do articles contain address? by Danny on Mar 20, 2017
  • On the APA References page add Retrieved from and the website address at the end of the citation. See the APA Help page for examples-https://guides.baker.edu/apahelp by ASK US on Mar 20, 2017
  • Is this information the same for scientific research journals and articles (still within APA)? by Haley on Apr 03, 2017
  • Yes, it is. See the APA Help guide for examples. guides.baker.edu/apahelp by ASK US on Apr 03, 2017
  • Do I have to put the name of the author of the article or website the article was from? by Hailee on May 01, 2017
  • The answer given was for the body of your paper. Here's how to cite an article both on the References page and in-text: Author Last Name, First & Middle Initials. (Date). Title of article: Subtitle of article. Title of Source, Volume(Issue), Page numbers. Retrieved from... In-text: Paraphrase: (Author Last Name, Year). Quotation: (Author Last Name, Year, p. Page Number). by ASK US on May 02, 2017
  • Do I put the title of essay in single quotation marks if I write in UK English (APA)? by joseph on Mar 25, 2019
  • See the APA Style Blog's post on How to Capitalize and Format Reference Titles in APA Style: https://blog.apastyle.org/apastyle/2012/03/how-to-capitalize-and-format-reference-titles-in-apa-style.html by Patrick Mullane on Mar 25, 2019

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When you directly quote the works of others in your paper, you will format quotations differently depending on their length. Below are some basic guidelines for incorporating quotations into your paper. Please note that all pages in MLA should be double-spaced .

Short quotations

To indicate short quotations (four typed lines or fewer of prose or three lines of verse) in your text, enclose the quotation within double quotation marks. Provide the author and specific page number (in the case of verse, provide line numbers) in the in-text citation, and include a complete reference on the Works Cited page. Punctuation marks such as periods, commas, and semicolons should appear after the parenthetical citation.

Question marks and exclamation points should appear within the quotation marks if they are a part of the quoted passage, but after the parenthetical citation if they are a part of your text.

For example, when quoting short passages of prose, use the following examples:

When using short (fewer than three lines of verse) quotations from poetry, mark breaks in verse with a slash, ( / ), at the end of each line of verse (a space should precede and follow the slash). If a stanza break occurs during the quotation, use a double slash ( // ).

Long quotations

For quotations that are more than four lines of prose or three lines of verse, place quotations in a free-standing block of text and omit quotation marks. Start the quotation on a new line, with the entire quote indented 1/2   inch  from the left margin while maintaining double-spacing. Your parenthetical citation should come  after the closing punctuation mark . When quoting verse, maintain original line breaks. (You should maintain double-spacing throughout your essay.)

For example, when citing more than four lines of prose, use the following examples :

Nelly Dean treats Heathcliff poorly and dehumanizes him throughout her narration: They entirely refused to have it in bed with them, or even in their room, and I had no more sense, so, I put it on the landing of the stairs, hoping it would be gone on the morrow. By chance, or else attracted by hearing his voice, it crept to Mr. Earnshaw's door, and there he found it on quitting his chamber. Inquiries were made as to how it got there; I was obliged to confess, and in recompense for my cowardice and inhumanity was sent out of the house. (Bronte 78)

When citing long sections of poetry (four lines of verse or more), keep formatting as close to the original as possible.

In his poem "My Papa's Waltz," Theodore Roethke explores his childhood with his father:

The whiskey on your breath Could make a small boy dizzy; But I hung on like death: Such waltzing was not easy. We Romped until the pans Slid from the kitchen shelf; My mother's countenance Could not unfrown itself. (qtd. in Shrodes, Finestone, Shugrue 202)

When citing two or more paragraphs, use block quotation format, even if the passage from the paragraphs is less than four lines. If you cite more than one paragraph, the first line of the second paragraph should be indented an extra 1/4 inch to denote a new paragraph:

In "American Origins of the Writing-across-the-Curriculum Movement," David Russell argues,

Writing has been an issue in American secondary and higher education since papers and examinations came into wide use in the 1870s, eventually driving out formal recitation and oral examination. . . .

From its birth in the late nineteenth century, progressive education has wrestled with the conflict within industrial society between pressure to increase specialization of knowledge and of professional work (upholding disciplinary standards) and pressure to integrate more fully an ever-widening number of citizens into intellectually meaningful activity within mass society (promoting social equity). . . . (3)

Adding or omitting words in quotations

If you add a word or words in a quotation, you should put brackets around the words to indicate that they are not part of the original text:

If you omit a word or words from a quotation, you should indicate the deleted word or words by using ellipses, which are three periods ( . . . ) preceded and followed by a space. For example:

Please note that brackets are not needed around ellipses unless they would add clarity.

When omitting words from poetry quotations, use a standard three-period ellipses; however, when omitting one or more full lines of poetry, space several periods to about the length of a complete line in the poem:

Examples

Article Writing for Students

how to add an article in an essay

It is quite a common activity for students to write something intended for publication. That task can mean writing an article , an entry for a competition, and a review, and all possible write-ups that can be published in an English magazine. It is a good activity to harness the students’ writing skills, creativity, attention to details, and many other skills related to writing that can be beneficial to them with any career they decide to pursue.

You may think that writing these kinds of write-ups is simply just a waste of time, but contrary to that belief, this exercise helps your creative juice flowing. Aside from that, it can help improve your techniques and styles when it comes to this activity, it can also help you develop a new approach that will improve your outputs, and overall, it improves your writing skills making you a better writer in the end.

article writing for students

In addition, it can either be formal writing and informal writing depending on the audience. Since the article could possibly be published in a publication, it must be informative writing and must be written in an interesting or entertaining manner in order to captivate the readers’ attention and retain their interest. If you look at it in another perspective, an article is in a less formal style than that of a report since their are no needs for graphs, does not use bullet points and sections.

An article is usually written to spread information, but more than that, it also describes an event, person, experience, etc. It can also be written with the intention of sharing a balanced opinion about a certain topic. Articles are useful sources of information as well as entertainment. In a journalistic point of view, there are quite a few types of articles namely news articles, feature articles, sports articles, editorial articles, and so on. Although these articles use different approaches and have varying standards, the one thing in common about them is that they are based on facts.

Therefore, articles are factual pieces of writing that can inform, entertain, describe, persuade, etc., the readers. As mentioned, the different types of articles may enforce different standards, thus, it can either be a short or lengthy article. In addition to that, articles are the different writings you usually read in a publication.

Structure of Article Writing

An effective article is structured with a captivating introduction that grabs the reader’s attention and briefly introduces the topic. This is followed by detailed body paragraphs that present evidence, examples, and arguments to thoroughly explore the subject. Each section is seamlessly linked with transition words, ensuring a smooth flow. The article concludes with a strong summary that reiterates the key points and reinforces the article’s main message.

Format of Article Writing for Students

Captivating and Relevant: Choose a title that immediately captures the interest of the reader and gives an idea of what the article is about.

Introduction

Hook: Start with an attention-grabbing sentence or question to pique the reader’s interest. Background Information: Provide a brief overview of the topic or issue being discussed. Thesis Statement: Present the main idea or argument of your article, setting the tone for the discussion that follows.

The body is where you delve into the details of your topic. It can be structured in several paragraphs, each with a specific focus.

Subheadings: Use subheadings to break down the article into manageable sections, each addressing a specific aspect of the topic. Supporting Information: Present facts, statistics, examples, or quotes to support your main idea. Ensure the information is accurate and relevant. Visual Elements: Where appropriate, include charts, graphs, or images to complement the text and enhance understanding.

Analysis and Discussion

Personal Insight: Share your analysis or interpretation of the information. This is where you can express opinions or offer a new perspective. Counterarguments: If presenting an argument, acknowledge opposing viewpoints and offer counterarguments to show a balanced understanding of the topic.
Summary: Briefly recap the main points discussed in the article, reinforcing the thesis statement. Call to Action: Encourage the reader to think, act, or further explore the topic. This could be a question, a suggestion, or a directive. Final Thought: Leave the reader with something to ponder, which could be a thought-provoking statement or a rhetorical question.

Example of Article Writing for Students

Introduction Have you ever felt like there are not enough hours in the day? You’re not alone. Many students struggle with balancing schoolwork, extracurricular activities, and personal time. This article delves into the significance of time management for students and offers practical tips to help you make the most of your day. Understanding Time Management Time management refers to the process of organizing and planning how to divide your time between specific activities. Good time management enables students to work smarter, not harder, so that they get more done in less time, even when time is tight and pressures are high. Benefits of Effective Time Management Improved Performance: By organizing your tasks and having a clear plan, you can focus better and achieve higher quality in your work. Reduced Stress: Managing your time well decreases stress levels by removing the pressure of last-minute deadlines and cramming sessions. More Free Time: Efficient scheduling means more leisure time to spend with friends and family, pursuing hobbies, or resting. Strategies for Better Time Management Set Clear Goals: Identify what you want to achieve in your study session. Setting SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Time-bound) goals can help keep you focused. Create a To-Do List: List everything you need to do, and tackle tasks in order of priority. Use a Planner: A planner can help you keep track of deadlines, appointments, and when you plan to complete each task. Break Tasks into Smaller Steps: Large tasks can seem overwhelming, but breaking them down into smaller, manageable steps can make them feel more achievable. Eliminate Distractions: Identify what commonly distracts you in your study environment and try to eliminate or reduce these distractions. Practice Saying No: It’s okay to turn down additional responsibilities if you think it might interfere with your existing commitments and study time. Conclusion Time management is a crucial skill that benefits students not just academically but in all aspects of life. By implementing effective time management strategies, you can improve your productivity, reduce stress, and increase your free time. Start by integrating one or two of the strategies mentioned above and gradually incorporate more as you become comfortable. Remember, the goal is to work smarter, not harder.

Article Writing for Students Samples to Edit & Download

  • Mental health awareness
  • Technology in education
  • Climate change action
  • Diversity in schools
  • Social media impact
  • Study techniques
  • Youth activism
  • Remote learning
  • Financial literacy
  • Extracurricular benefits
  • Arts in education
  • Cyberbullying prevention
  • Career exploration
  • Community service
  • Gender equality
  • Peer pressure effects
  • Mental health stigma
  • Sustainable living
  • Youth representation in media
  • Critical thinking skills.

Article Writing for Students Examples & Templates

1. article review template.

Article Review Template

2. Article Summary Template

Article Summary Template

3. Magazine Article Writing Exercises Example

Magazine Article Writing Exercises Example

4. Article Writing Worksheet Example

Article Writing Worksheet Example1

5. Article Examples for Students

Article Examples for Students

tea.texas.gov

6. Newspaper Article Example

Newspaper Article Example

7. Feature Article Writing Worksheet Example

Feature Article Writing Worksheet Example1

8. Short Editorial Article Example

Editorial Article Example

9. Newspaper Article Format Example

Newspaper Article Format Example

10. Persuasive Article Example

Persuasive Article Example

11. Article for School Magazine Example

Article for School Magazine Example

12. College Newspaper/Online Article Example

College Newspaper Online Article Example

13. Sports and Academic Performance Article Example

Sports and Academic Performance Article Example

14. Current Events Article Worksheet Example

Current Events Article Worksheet Example

Essential Information About Writing Articles for Students

Before you proceed in writing articles , you need to understand what makes it different from other forms of writing first. If you are not able to determine and understand what makes an article an article , you may end writing an essay or another form of writing instead. To help you with that, listed below are essential information about writing articles:

1. The reader is identified

An article is basically a direct conversation with your reader. If a portion in an exam is for you to write an article, the reader may be identified or specified as part of the instructions. That way you can write your article as if you are directly discussing your topic with them. In this sense, the tone, sentences, and words you use in your article must be conversational and easy to understand for your readers. More importantly, you need to remember that the main goal is to cater to your readers; you need to be able to spark their interest and sustain in all throughout the article.

2. It needs to be attention-getting

The main thing that sparks you readers’ interest is your title. Since the title is the first few descriptive writing words your readers will be able to read before the content of the article, it must be attention-getting, meaning, it must be catchy but still has substance. The title of your article must represent the entirety of your article, therefore, it must be accurate but at the same time interesting. After establishing a good title for your article, the content should definitely match what is in the title; it must be accurate and at the same time factual.

3. It has to be interesting

Similarly to what has been discussed above, an article needs to be interesting. Aside from being informative and factual, another goal should be to be able to maintain the readers’ interest in your content. The article must be engaging from start to finish. If you are writing an article for an exam, you must remember that your teacher has to read quite a few articles of the same main topic. You have to think of a way to make your article interesting and memorable, maybe try a new approach, use more engaging sentences; you have to find a way to make you reader want to read your article up to the last word. For example, you can add humor (if appropriate), real-life or made-up examples, or make up quotes.

4. It should be easy to read

One common mistake when writing articles is being overwhelmed by the topic and writing an entire page of monotonous rambles. Although in some cases it is necessary, like in a news or editorial article. However, there are ways when you can make it a breeze to read for your readers; for example, you can use subheadings to break up the text and make clear paragraphs. Make sure that your ideas are organized in a way that your readers can easily comprehend, you can write in a semi-informal, conversational style; however, you may want to abide to the instructions that you will be given. Remember that in an article, there is no need to reiterate the issue or topic, you really only have to explore and expand the topic to encourage your reader to read on.

5. There should be a good ending

The difference with an essay and an article is that in an essay you need to sum up the point you have made in the entire write-up in your conclusion while in an article, there is no need for that; the best way to end your article is to give the reader something to ponder even after reading the entirety of the article. Most of the time, the best endings link back to the starting point in some way. You can ask a question or some powerful or impactful sentence that will make your readers think about what they have read.

Tips to Write Good Articles for Students

By now, you basically have an idea how to write an article. However, there is quite a distinction between a mediocre and good article. To help you produce a good and effective article, listed below are some useful tips in writing good articles:

  • Your opening or lead should be easy to read. Meaning it should be simple and short, but at the same time, it should also be able to provide a good overview of the article.
  • Keep your paragraphs short and your text visually appealing.
  • Provide context on the 5 Ws: Who, What, Where, When, and Why. Occasionally, there might be room for the How provide insightful context.
  • Give meaningful substance.
  • Show then tell. State or present your main goal, then explain and expand it.
  • Learn to quote properly.
  • Research, research, research! If there is an opportunity or the topic is already given, always do advance research.
  • It’s acceptable to use semi-formal language unlike in an essay.
  • Always be accurate and factual.
  • Proofread and edit. Always.

Article writing is an exercise commonly practiced by students; it may not be as easy as it sounds, the skills developed with this exercise is as useful as any other skills. It has the ability to help students develop and improve their communication skills as well as harness their creativity. It may even be the starting point of a student in deciding to pursue journalism or any other course that offers the opportunity to write about significant matters. Although it is quite similar to essay writing, it is still different in a way topics are discussed and presented. We hope that you have learned something about article writing especially when this is a reoccurring exercise in your classes. The examples given above are for your own use. May it give you more knowledge about the fact and inspiration.

  • Clearly defined subject matter or theme that unifies the photographs and tells a cohesive story.
  • An intentional narrative structure that guides the viewer through the photo essay, whether chronological, thematic, or conceptual.
  • A strong introduction that captures the viewer’s attention and sets the tone for the photo essay.
  • A series of high-quality and visually compelling images that effectively convey the chosen theme or story.
  • A variety of shots, including wide-angle, close-ups, detail shots, and different perspectives, to add visual interest and depth.
  • Careful sequencing of images to create a logical flow and emotional impact, guiding the viewer through the narrative.
  • Thoughtful captions or accompanying text that provide context, additional information, or insights, enhancing the viewer’s understanding.
  • A concluding section that brings the photo essay to a satisfying close, leaving a lasting impression on the viewer.
  • The incorporation of images that evoke emotions and connect with the viewer on a personal or empathetic level.
  • Consideration of the audience, aiming to engage and connect with viewers by addressing universal themes or issues.

How  to Write an Article for Students

1. understand your audience:.

  • Consider the age group and educational level of your target audience.
  • Identify their interests, concerns, and common challenges.

2. Choose a Relevant Topic:

  • Select a topic that resonates with students’ experiences or addresses their needs.
  • Make it interesting and relevant to their daily lives.

3. Create a Catchy Title:

  • Craft a title that grabs attention and gives a clear idea of the article’s content.
  • Keep it concise but intriguing.

4. Introduction:

  • Start with a hook to capture the reader’s interest.
  • Provide background information on the topic.
  • Clearly state the purpose or main idea of the article.

5. Body Paragraphs:

  • Organize your content into logical paragraphs.
  • Each paragraph should focus on a specific point or subtopic.
  • Use clear and simple language.
  • Support your ideas with examples, anecdotes, or relevant information.
  • Consider incorporating bullet points or lists for easy readability.

6. Use Student-Friendly Language:

  • Avoid jargon and complex vocabulary unless necessary.
  • Define any technical terms or concepts to ensure understanding.

7. Include Visuals:

  • If applicable, add images, graphs, or infographics to enhance understanding.
  • Break up long paragraphs with visuals for better engagement.

8. Encourage Interaction:

  • Pose questions or prompts that encourage students to think or share their experiences.
  • Consider including a call-to-action, such as inviting comments or discussions.

9. Be Concise and Clear:

  • Keep sentences and paragraphs short and to the point.
  • Ensure clarity in your explanations.

10. Conclusion:

  • Summarize key points.
  • End with a strong concluding statement or a call to action.
  • Consider suggesting further reading or resources for interested students.

How do you Start an Article for Student Example?

Certainly! The beginning of your article, often referred to as the introduction, should captivate your readers and set the tone for the rest of the piece. Here’s an example of how you might start an article:

Title: “The Power of Curiosity: Unlocking Your Learning Potential”

Introduction:

In a world brimming with information, curiosity acts as the key to unlocking the doors of knowledge. As students, you’re on a perpetual quest for understanding, seeking answers to questions that pique your interest and spark your imagination. Have you ever wondered, though, about the profound impact curiosity can have on your learning journey?

Picture this: You’re sitting in a classroom, the hum of fluorescent lights overhead, and your teacher begins a lesson on a subject that’s not just part of the curriculum, but a gateway to a world of possibilities. It’s in these moments that the flame of curiosity can either flicker or blaze, shaping the way you absorb and apply knowledge. In this article, we’ll delve into the significance of curiosity in the realm of education and explore how nurturing this innate quality can transform your academic experience.

Join me as we embark on a journey to unravel the mysteries of curiosity, discovering its role in fostering a love for learning and its potential to open doors you might not have even known existed.

What is the easiest way to write an article for Students?

1. choose a familiar topic:.

  • Select a topic you are passionate about or have some knowledge in.
  • Familiarity with the subject will make the writing process smoother.

2. Outline Your Ideas:

  • Create a simple outline with key points you want to cover.
  • Organize these points logically to create a flow in your article.

3. Introduction:

  • Start with a hook to grab readers’ attention.
  • Clearly state the purpose or main idea of your article.

4. Body Paragraphs:

  • Each paragraph should cover a specific point from your outline.
  • Use simple language and be concise.
  • Support your ideas with examples or evidence.

5. Use Subheadings:

  • Break your article into sections using subheadings.
  • This helps readers follow your main points easily.

6. Write Simply:

  • Use straightforward language. Avoid unnecessary jargon.
  • Imagine you are explaining your ideas to a friend.

7. Be Concise:

  • Stick to the main points; avoid unnecessary details.
  • Short sentences and paragraphs are often more effective.

8. Conclusion:

  • Summarize your main points.
  • End with a concluding statement or a call to action.

FAQ’s

What does an article look like.

An article typically consists of a title, introduction, body paragraphs with key points, subheadings, and a conclusion. It conveys information, ideas, or opinions in a structured and cohesive manner.

What is the first line of an article?

The first line of an article, known as the hook, aims to capture the reader’s attention. It introduces the topic, sparks interest, and sets the tone for the entire piece.

Twitter

AI Generator

Text prompt

  • Instructive
  • Professional

10 Examples of Public speaking

20 Examples of Gas lighting

Can you trust 2024 election polls on Donald Trump and Joe Biden? Here's how to cut through the noise.

how to add an article in an essay

Love them or hate them, political polls aren’t going anywhere. As the 2024 presidential election kicks into high gear, the internet will be flooded with surveys tracking the horserace between President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump.

Keeping track of the numbers can be daunting: Who's ahead in national polls? Who's ahead in state-level surveys? Figuring out which numbers to pay attention to – and whether any of it actually matters – can be even more challenging.  

Luckily, the USA TODAY Network has got you covered. Here’s a refresher on why polls matter, whether you can trust them and what to look out for this year.  

What do polls tell us about the election?  

Think of polls as quick snapshots rather than crystal ball readings.  

Prep for the polls: See who is running for president and compare where they stand on key issues in our Voter Guide

They don’t necessarily predict the results of an election. Rather, they’re used to gauge how people feel about a race during a specific period. Pollsters may ask questions about the future, but surveys have more to say about the voters' current temperature.

Polls also tend to have a short shelf life. Public opinion can shift quickly, meaning that the results of polls are often only a reliable measure of the state of a race during the time they were taken. 

A survey taken two months ago won’t reflect the state of a race today, and a poll fielded tomorrow won’t tell us who is going to win the presidential election in November.

However, that doesn't mean polls captured at the beginning of a campaign cycle don't matter. The insights from early polls tease out the major issues voters are thinking about that could shape the race.  They also help trace the trendlines of how a candidate is performing – whether they’re gaining traction, stagnating or losing support. 

Pollster John Zogby likened the importance of looking at early polling to checking benchmarks while trying to reach an exercise goal.  

“Am I going to get on the scale the day before to see how I did?” said Zogby. “No, I get on the scale every so often to say what am I doing? How am I doing? What am I doing right?” 

Conducting polls early in a race and often throughout the course of an election allows political scientists, journalists and the public to track trends and spot major inflection points in campaigns.  

Beware of two-candidate polls  

Not all polls are built the same. The way a survey is designed, from how questions are worded to the demographics of the participants chosen, can influence the accuracy of its results.  

David Paleologos , director of the Suffolk University Political Research Center, said political polls are most accurate when they replicate as closely as possible the questions and options voters will see on their ballot.

For instance, he said that polls on the 2024 presidential election should include choices beyond the two major party candidates – Trump and Biden – because most ballots will contain third-party and independent candidates who will garner some support.  

“If the polls only show a binary choice, between Trump or Biden, you're not getting the full picture,” Paleologos said.

He pointed to close margins in critical swing states, including Wisconsin, Arizona and Georgia, during the 2020 election as an example. Trump lost in those states by fewer votes than Libertarian Party candidate Jo Jorgensen received.  

If Jorgensen had not been in the race, the results in those battlegrounds, and possibly the outcome of the election nationally, could have looked markedly different, Paleologos said.

The Libertarian Party hasn’t yet chosen its candidate for the 2024 election. But early polls that include the party and other independent candidates as options are likely to more accurately show how disaffected voters are looking at their options, he explained.

Suffolk University and USA TODAY have a partnership collecting polling data and insights.

Who's being polled?

Another factor that can impact a poll’s accuracy is the sample population surveyed. Polls randomly select a small sample of people designed to represent the broader views and attitudes of a larger population. But every organization uses different methodologies to create their samples.  

For instance, some election polls take the temperature of the general population, while others only include active voters or likely voters. They also may weigh demographic information, such as the ratio of Democrats to Republicans, differently.  

In the 2024 race, Zogby, author of the forthcoming book "Beyond the Horse Race: How to Read Polls and Why We Should," suggested that the most accurate polls include only likely voters, the pool of people already planning to cast a ballot in November.

“A likely voter today may not be a likely voter on October 31,” Zogby said, but capturing these voters allows political scientists to better understand the Americans who will choose the next president.

Should I pay attention to national polls or state surveys?

Pollsters were lambasted in 2016 for projecting that then-Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton would win the election over Trump.

But national polls , which are supposed to reflect the popular vote across all states, were technically right. Overall, Clinton won nearly 2.9 million more votes than Trump.  

So, what went wrong? Many analysts overstated Clinton’s lead in national polls, and few organizations conducted state-specific polls in former Democratic strongholds, such as Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, that Trump was able to capture. His wins in those states ultimately landed him the electoral college victory.  

That’s not to say that national polls are inferior to state polls, but you should think of them differently.

“National polls are more valuable to understand what the issues are impacting likely voters,” Paleologos said, while state polls better represent the horserace.

He and other polling experts told USA TODAY that Biden needs to lead Trump by three to four percentage points in a national poll to be tied with the Republican in the electoral college . That's because large liberal-leaning states like California and New York tend to tilt the results of national polls in Democrats’ favor, whereas the "electoral college these days skews Republican," Zogby said.

In other words, a national poll showing Biden and Trump tied would tell a similar story to a swing state poll that shows Trump leading Biden by a few points.  But generally, experts warn against comparing national and state surveys, which are built off of different methodologies, against one another.

Can you trust the polls?  

Mostly. Because polls are analyzing a myriad of shifting factors, they'll always have some level of uncertainty baked in, regardless of the specific election. Organizations also don’t collaborate on what states they plan to poll, or when, which means there’s always potential for blind spots, like in 2016. 

Some political observers rely on poll averages, such as a tally from Real Clear Politics. These are generally reliable, but they can miss trends.

But when interpreted properly, polls often provide an accurate portrait of the state of an election. 

“There are folks that will say, ‘Oh, you missed the election by two points,’” Zogby said. "Well, two points – that showed the ballpark of what was going to happen.” 

And the more polls there are, the easier it is to evaluate the race.  

IMAGES

  1. How to Introduce a Journal Article in an Essay

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  2. How To Cite An Article In An Essay

    how to add an article in an essay

  3. How to Write an Article for FCE Writing

    how to add an article in an essay

  4. How To Annotate An Article: Learn Annotation Strategies

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  5. How to Write a Research Paper in 11 Easy Steps

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  6. How to cite an article when writing an essay

    how to add an article in an essay

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Introduce a Journal Article in an Essay

    In an academic essay, you typically introduce a journal article in the first sentence of a paragraph. Then, use the sentences that follow to show how the material from the article relates to the rest of your essay. Submit a Tip. All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published. Submit.

  2. How to Cite an Article in an Essay? (APA and MLA)

    The author's name might be unknown. If it's the case, use the first several words from the article's title but omit "A," "An," or "The" at the beginning. It can be written in quotes or italics, depending on how it's written in your list of references. The number of words you pick to use depends on the title.

  3. How to Cite a Journal Article

    In an MLA Works Cited entry for a journal article, the article title appears in quotation marks, the name of the journal in italics—both in title case. List up to two authors in both the in-text citation and the Works Cited entry. For three or more, use "et al.". MLA format. Author last name, First name.

  4. How to Write an Academic Essay with References and Citations

    When learning how to write an academic essay with references, you must identify reliable sources that support your argument. As you read, think critically and evaluate sources for: Accuracy. Objectivity. Currency. Authority. Keep detailed notes on the sources so that you can easily find them again, if needed.

  5. How to Integrate Sources

    Integrating sources means incorporating another scholar's ideas or words into your work. It can be done by: Quoting. Paraphrasing. Summarizing. By integrating sources properly, you can ensure a consistent voice in your writing and ensure your text remains readable and coherent. You can use signal phrases to give credit to outside sources and ...

  6. Quoting and integrating sources into your paper

    Important guidelines. When integrating a source into your paper, remember to use these three important components: Introductory phrase to the source material: mention the author, date, or any other relevant information when introducing a quote or paraphrase. Source material: a direct quote, paraphrase, or summary with proper citation.

  7. How to Cite Sources

    At college level, you must properly cite your sources in all essays, research papers, and other academic texts (except exams and in-class exercises). Add a citation whenever you quote, paraphrase, or summarize information or ideas from a source. You should also give full source details in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your text.

  8. MLA: Citing Within Your Paper

    An in-text citation can be included in one of two ways as shown below: 1. Put all the citation information at the end of the sentence: 2. Include author name as part of the sentence (if author name unavailable, include title of work): Each source cited in-text must also be listed on your Works Cited page. RefWorks includes a citation builder ...

  9. In-Text Citations: The Basics

    When using APA format, follow the author-date method of in-text citation. This means that the author's last name and the year of publication for the source should appear in the text, like, for example, (Jones, 1998). One complete reference for each source should appear in the reference list at the end of the paper.

  10. Crediting and Citing Your Sources

    In this section, we'll discuss three ways to cite or identify written source materials in your own writing. 1. Introduce the Author and/or the Title of the Source. By introducing the author or the material, you make it clear to the reader that what you're talking about is from a source.

  11. MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics

    In-text citations: Author-page style. MLA format follows the author-page method of in-text citation. This means that the author's last name and the page number (s) from which the quotation or paraphrase is taken must appear in the text, and a complete reference should appear on your Works Cited page. The author's name may appear either in the ...

  12. How to reference an article in Harvard referencing style

    The name of the author in a newspaper article is referred to as a byline. Below are examples for citing an article both with and without a byline. Reference list (print) structure: Last name, F. (Year published). 'Article title', Newspaper name, Day Month, Page (s). Example: Hamilton, J. (2018).

  13. How do I incorporate academic sources into my paper?

    Return to Student Resources Sources are an important part of any paper Whether you are referencing a primary text from your class or a secondary text that supports your argument, sources lend credibility to your ideas and give your reader the impression that you are trustworthy; knowledgeable; and experienced when it comes to your topic. There are a variety of ways to include sources in your ...

  14. The Basics of In-Text Citation

    At college level, you must properly cite your sources in all essays, research papers, and other academic texts (except exams and in-class exercises). Add a citation whenever you quote, paraphrase, or summarize information or ideas from a source. You should also give full source details in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your text.

  15. How to Title an Article in an Essay (A Comprehensive Guide)

    When you mention a large standalone work (a book, a film, a journal, a website, a magazine, or a movie), you must italicize it and then capitalize all major words. (You should capitalize articles in the middle of the title, prepositions, and coordinating conjunctions. Examples showing how to write large works in MLA.

  16. How to Add an Article Title Into the Text Using APA Format

    Including an article title in the text of your writing serves a different purpose than including it in the Works Cited section of a paper. You may want to include the title of an article in your paper when it is the main subject you're writing about, a subject you're discussing that you're referring to ...

  17. Correct Way to Write an Article Title in a Paper

    If you must include the book or journal where the article is found in your paper, italicize it in both styles. In-text citations are also necessary when listing an article in your paper. For MLA style, an in-text citation includes the author's last name and the page number in parentheses, such as (Bedford 4). For APA style, the in-text citation ...

  18. How do I actually write the names of the article and the journal

    Answer. To write the name of a journal/magazine title in the body of your paper: The title of the journal should be in italics - Example: Journal of the American Medical Association. Capitalize all of the major words. To write the the name of an article title in the body of your paper: The title of the article should be in quotation marks - E ...

  19. The Beginner's Guide to Writing an Essay

    Come up with a thesis. Create an essay outline. Write the introduction. Write the main body, organized into paragraphs. Write the conclusion. Evaluate the overall organization. Revise the content of each paragraph. Proofread your essay or use a Grammar Checker for language errors. Use a plagiarism checker.

  20. MLA Formatting Quotations

    Adding or omitting words in quotations. If you add a word or words in a quotation, you should put brackets around the words to indicate that they are not part of the original text: Jan Harold Brunvand, in an essay on urban legends, states, "some individuals [who retell urban legends] make a point of learning every rumor or tale" (78).

  21. Article Writing for Students

    Format of Article Writing for Students Title. Captivating and Relevant: Choose a title that immediately captures the interest of the reader and gives an idea of what the article is about. Introduction. Hook: Start with an attention-grabbing sentence or question to pique the reader's interest. Background Information: Provide a brief overview of the topic or issue being discussed.

  22. How to Structure an Essay

    The basic structure of an essay always consists of an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. But for many students, the most difficult part of structuring an essay is deciding how to organize information within the body. This article provides useful templates and tips to help you outline your essay, make decisions about your structure, and ...

  23. Donald Trump vs. Joe Biden: What to know about 2024 election polls

    Pollster John Zogby likened the importance of looking at early polling to checking benchmarks while trying to reach an exercise goal. "Am I going to get on the scale the day before to see how I ...

  24. How to Quote

    Citing a quote in APA Style. To cite a direct quote in APA, you must include the author's last name, the year, and a page number, all separated by commas. If the quote appears on a single page, use "p."; if it spans a page range, use "pp.". An APA in-text citation can be parenthetical or narrative.