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How To Present With A Group: 14 Expert Tips

Hrideep barot.

  • Presentation

group work

If we consider the research and writing part of a presentation, then a group presentation doesn’t seem that different from a single-person presentation. 

If you wish to deliver a successful presentation, you still need to put in a fair deal of individual research, writing, and practice. Even for the presenting bit: when you speak, the onus of delivering a great speech, as well as the audience’s attention, is going to be on you. 

However, a group presentation is significantly different from a normal presentation. 

While you’ll still have to do your own research, the amount of research you’ll have to do will probably be decreased, as the research material will be divided amongst all the members. Practice and delivery of the speech will not be merely an individual thing: you’ll have to work and synch it with the rest of the group.

Moreover, while it might seem that the individual responsibility is going to reduce if you’re delivering a presentation with more than one person, often the case is quite the opposite. This is because if a single person messes up–or simply doesn’t wish to put in as much effort as the others–the repercussions are going to be faced by the entire group. 

However, group presentations don’t necessarily have to be a difficult thing. Think of your most favorite sports team: what makes the team the best? What makes them stand out from other teams? How are they successful?

The answer for what makes a sports team the best isn’t much different from what makes a group presentation the best: 

Advance planning and division of work, having a strong leader, fostering a sense of comariderie between group members, as well as staying vigilant and supportive on the big day are the key to delivering an awesome group presentation.  

And the goal isn’t as tough to achieve as you might think. 

Stick till the end of this article to find out! 

What Is A Group Presentation?

A group presentation is a collaborative exercise in which a team of speakers works together to create and deliver a presentation on a given topic. The number of members in a group presentation can range from anything between two to over ten! Group presentations are used in a variety of settings like school, workplace, colleges, seminars, etc. 

While the task of presenting with a group of people might feel daunting, especially if you identify as a lone wolf, group presentations can be a great learning experience and teach you how to better navigate the task of dealing with a multitude of people with a multitude of opinions and experiences. 

By keeping in mind a few things, group presentations can be delivered just as efficiently as single-speaker presentations.

Is A Group Presentation For You? 

To decide whether you should deliver a group presentation or not, you need to decide whether the pros of a group presentation outweigh the cons for you. 

Group presentations are great because they decrease workload, increase efficiency, improve the quantity and quality of ideas, and also provide you with experience to work in a group setting. 

However, there are a few fall-backs to group presentation as well. 

Sometimes, a few group members might not work as hard as the other ones, thus increasing the workload on the other members. Also, group members might have different ideas and opinions, which can cause clashes within the group. Coordinating between the group members might be a problem. And if you’re a shy person, you might find it difficult to speak out and voice your opinion in front of other group members. 

So, there is no single answer to whether you should do a group presentation or not. Weigh in the pros and cons of doing one before making your decision. 

Tips For Delivering A Group Presentation: The Preparation Stage 

working with a group

1. Decide On The Purpose Of Your Presentation

First and foremost, you must determine what is the purpose of your presentation. It might seem like a redundant step, but trust me: it’s not. You’ll be surprised by how different people perceive and understand the same topic.

So, say you’re delivering a research paper on the topic “The Effect Of The Coronavirus Pandemic On Street Animals”, sit down together and ask your group members what each individual person thinks the topic is about and the points they feel we need to include in it.

If possible, one member can jot down all the points that the other speakers make, and once all the members are done talking, you can come to a consensus about what to and what not to include in the presentation. 

2. Choose A Presentation Moderator 

In the simplest terms, the presentation moderator is the designated “leader” of a group. That is, they’re the one responsible for the effective functioning of the group, and to make sure that the group achieves their shared purpose i.e giving the presentation.

They sort out any potential conflicts in the group, help out other members when they ask for guidance, and also have the final say on important decisions that the group makes. The best and the simplest way to select the presentation moderator is by vote. This will ensure that every member has a say, and avoid any potential conflicts in the future. 

3. Divide The Work Fairly  

The next step is to divide the work. The best way to do this is to break your presentation into equal parts, and then to assign them to group members. While doing so, you can keep in mind individuals’ preferences, experience, and expertise. For example, if there are three people, you can divide your presentation into three sections: the beginning, the middle, and the end.

Then you can ask which member would feel more comfortable with a particular section, and assign the sections accordingly. In case of any overlap, the individual members can be asked to decide themselves who’s the better fit for the part. Alternatively, if the situation doesn’t seem to resolve, the presentation moderator can step in and assign parts randomly to the members; the members can do this themselves, too. 

4 . Do A Member Analysis 

To know the individual strengths and weaknesses of group members, it’s important to carry out a member analysis. Not everyone feels comfortable in front of a crowd. Or, someone could be great at building presentations, but not so good with speaking into a mic. On the contrary, a member might be an excellent orator but terrible with technology.

So, in order to efficiently divide the work and to have a seamless presentation, carry out a member analysis beforehand. 

5. Individual And Group Practice Are Equally Important 

Individual practice is important as it helps you prepare the presentation in solitude, as you would if you were the only speaker. Practicing alone is generally more comfortable, as you do not have to worry about other people watching or judging you.

It also allows you to prepare at your own convenience and time, while for group practice you’ll have to adjust to when it’s convenient for the other members to practice, as well.

Besides, the individual practice also saves the group’s time as each member can simultaneously but separately prep their own part, while group practice sessions are often longer as the other members generally have to pay attention to the speaking member instead of their own bit.

However, it’s essential to do group practice at least three to four times before delivering your presentation. This is important not just for the smooth delivery of the presentation, but also for the group members to grow comfortable with each other.

Group practice sessions also help you time out the total duration of the presentation, have smooth transitions between speakers, avoid repetitions, and also sort out any potential hiccups or fallbacks in the presentation. 

6. Perfect The Transitions 

A common fallback of group presentations is having awkward transitions between members. Not only will this be an unpleasant experience for the audience, but it might also make you waste precious time.

So, make sure you practice and perfect the transitions before the big day. It doesn’t have to be too long–even a single line will do. What matters is how well you execute it. 

7. Bond With The Group Members 

Bonding with the group is a great way to enhance the overall presentation experience; both, for yourself as well as the audience. This is because a better bond between the group members will make for the smoother functioning of the group, reduce potential conflicts, make decisions quickly and more easily, and also make the presentation fun!

The audience will also be able to sense, maybe even witness, this camaraderie between the members. They will thus have a better viewing experience.

There are many ways to improve the bonding between group members. Before the presentation, you could go out for dinner, a movie, or even meet up at one location–like somebody’s house–to get to know each other better. Group calls are another option. You could also play an ice-breaker if you’re up for some fun games!

8. Watch Other Group Presentations Together 

This is another great way of bonding with the team and also improving your presentation skills as you do so. By listening to other group presentations, you will be able to glean a better idea of how you can better strategize your own presentation. As you watch the presentation, make note of things like the time division, the way the topics are divided, the transition between speakers, etc. 

A few presentations you could watch are: 

Delivering A Successful Team Presentation 

Takeaway: This is a great video to learn how to deliver a  great group presentation. As you watch the video, make note of all the different tips that each speaker gives, and also how they incorporate  them in their own presentation, which goes on simulatenously with the tips. 

Sample Group Presentation: Non-Verbal Communication

Takeaway: This is another great video that depicts how you can deliver a presentation with a group. Notice how the topics are divided, the transition between different speakers, and also the use of visuals in the presentation. 

AthleteTranx Team Presentation- 2012 Business Plan Competition

Takeaway: Another great example of a group presentation that you can watch with your own group. In this video, keep a lookout for how the different speakers smoothly transition, their body language, and the way the presentation itself is organized to make it an amazing audience experience. 

Tips For Delivering A Group Presentation: The Presentation Stage  

presenting with people

1.Introduce All Members 

A good idea to keep in mind while delivering a group presentation is to introduce all members at the onset of the presentation. This will familiarize the audience with them, and also work to ease the member’s nerves.

Besides, an introduction will make the members feel more included, and if done correctly, can also give a more shy member a confidence boost. The simplest way of introducing members is to have the person beginning the speech do it. Alternatively, the presentation moderator could do it. 

Need some tips on how to introduce people? Check out our article on How To Introduce A Speaker In Any Setting (And Amaze Your Audience).

2. Coordinate Your Dressing 

What better way to make people believe that you’re a team than dressing up as one? 

Coordinated dressing not only makes the group stand out from the audience, but it can also make the group members feel more like one team. 

A general rule of thumb is to dress one level more formally than your audience. Don’t wear your casual clothes: remember that it’s a formal event and your clothing must reflect that. Also, keep in mind individual preferences and beliefs while choosing the clothing.

This is important as if a person is uncomfortably dressed, it can have a negative impact on their performance, which will eventually be detrimental to the group performance. 

Confused about what to wear on the presentation day? Check out our article on Guide: Colors To Wear During A Presentation.

3. Make Sure To Incorporate Visual & Audio Aids

Visual elements like photographs, videos, graphs, etc. Are a must in all presentations, group or otherwise. This is because visual aids help the audience better understand the topic, besides making the presentation a better experience overall. Same goes with audio elements, which include things like audio clips, music, background sounds etc. 

So, if you wish to have your audience’s attention, make sure to incorporate tons of visual and audio elements in your presentation. You could also divide the kind of visual elements you use between different members: for example, one person could show a short documentary to expand on their point, and the other could make use of memes and animation to add a dose of fun to their part. 

4. Pay Attention To What Others Are Saying 

Another thing to keep in mind while delivering your speech is to pay attention to what the other speakers are saying. While it might be tempting to tune out others and use the extra time to rehearse your own presentation, it’s not a good idea to do so.

Remember that the audience can see each speaker on the stage. If you don’t look interested, then why should they pay attention? Besides, your lack of attention can make the speaker feel bad: if their own team members aren’t listening to them speaking, does that mean they’re doing a bad job? So, make sure to keep your eyes and ears on your teammate as they deliver their speech.

5. Remember All Speech Parts By Heart 

This is a great way to ensure that you have a seamless presentation. One of the primary benefits of having a team to work with is knowing that you can turn to them for help if something goes wrong.

So, it’s important to not just practice and work together but to also be well-versed in what other group members are going to be saying. This will make it easier for you to cue or help someone if they forget their part. Also, if there’s an emergency or if a member is not able to make it to the speech, the other members can easily take their place.

6. Work Together For A Question And Answer Session 

Q & A sessions are a common element in most presentations. They might seem daunting to an individual speaker, however, a group setting makes the session much easier. This is because an individual speaker doesn’t have to know everything about the topic.

The presentation moderator can simply refer to the speaker who is the most well-versed about the topic or is best able to answer the question from the group, and they can answer it. 

Creative Ideas To Make Use Of Multiple Presenters! 

teamwork

There are many ways by which you can use the fact that there’s not just one single presentator but many to your advantage. A few of them are: 

1. Add A Dose Of Fun With Skits! 

Adding a dose of creativity to your presentation will greatly enhance its appeal to the audience, and make it more likely that they will remember your presentation in the future! 

One way of doing this is by having a short skirt in the opening. This is another great way of introducing the members, and of warming up the audience to them.

A fun skit can not only expand on the topic you’re about to present but will also elevate the audience’s mood, which will improve their attention span as well as their opinion of you! What else could you ask for?

2. Make Them Engage With Cosplay! 

Cosplay is another great way of making your presentation stand apart! This can make the presentation more interactive for the audience, as well, and earn you that sought-after dose of chuckling.

It’s not necessary to buy the most expensive costumes or be perfect in your cosplay, either. You can pick an outfit that’s easy to drape over your other outfit, and pick props that are easy to carry as well as versatile so that you can use them in other parts of your presentation as well. 

3. Write & Sing A Song Together!

Listen, you don’t have to be a professional singer or composer to do this. You’re not trying to sell a studio album. All you need is a little dose of creativity and some brainstorming, and you can write a song that helps you explain a component of your speech better.

You could even summarize the entire topic in that song, and sing it in the end as a sort of post-credits scene (thank you, Marvel). Alternatively, the song doesn’t necessarily have to explain your speech, but can simply be a surprise element after you’re done with the main part of your speech! 

4. Record A Short Film!

If you don’t want to have a live skit, another creative way to add fun to your skit is by recording a short film beforehand and playing it during your presentation. The film doesn’t have to be very long–even a few minutes work.

What matters is the content of the film, and how well-made it is. If not all members wish to act or record themselves, the ones that are not up for it can do the editing and compilation, or even write the script! After all, it’s not just actors that make a film successful: a strong director and writer are just as important! 

5. Have A Continuous Story 

Another great way to make the presentation seem more connected and seamless is by incorporating a continuous story. You can pick a story–or even make one up–related to your topic and break it up in sections.

Then, assign a section to each speaker. This will not only make the presentation more intriguing but if done right will also hook your audience’s attention and make them anticipate what comes next. Awesome, right? 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q. how do i begin a group presentation.

To begin a group presentation, have the moderator or any other group member introduce all other members and the topic that they’ll be speaking on. This might seem like a redundancy, however it is anything but useless.

This gives the chance to the audience to become familiar with the speakers, which is necessary if you want them to grow comfortable with you. Also, prior introduction of members saves the audience’s time, as each speaker will not have to re-introduce themself before driving into their topic. 

If each member wishes to individually introduce themselves, then that can be done too. However, make sure that you’ve practiced transitioning between members smoothly, so as to avoid making the switch look awkward.

Next, share a brief summary of what you’re going to be talking about. Like the introduction, you could even split the summary among yourselves, with each speaker describing briefly what they’re going to be talking about. Tell the audience why it’s relevant, and how you’re planning to go about giving the speech. Incorporating attention-grabbing statements is another good idea.

This could be a sneak peek into what’s going to be coming in your presentation, or simply a relevant statement, fact or statistic. Make sure the introduction doesn’t last too long, as you want to keep the audience fresh and primed for the main content of your speech. 

For some awesome opening lines, check out our article on 15 Powerful Speech Opening Lines (And How To Create Your Own).

Q. HOW DO I TRANSITION BETWEEN DIFFERENT SPEAKERS?

As mentioned before, having a smooth transition between speakers in the group is imperative to provide the audience with a seamless experience. The abrupt way of doing this would be to simply have the first speaker stop and for the other speaker to begin speaking.

However, a better way to transition would be by using transitional phrases. Pass the baton to the next speaker by introducing them. You could do this by saying something like, “To talk about the next topic we have…” Or something like, “Now I would like to invite…” 

After verbally introducing them, it’s also a good idea to motion towards or look towards the new speaker. Also, if you’re the next speaker, it’s always good manners to thank the previous one. 

Transitioning is one place where many presentations go wrong. Practicing the transition might seem redundant, but it’s anything but that. In fact, it’s as necessary as the practice of the other elements of your speech. Also, make sure to incorporate both, verbal and non-verbal cues while moving to the next speaker. That is, don’t just say that ‘A’ is going to be speaking now and then walk away.

Make eye contact with the speaker, motion for them towards the podium, or smile at them. That is, both speakers should acknowledge the presence of each other.

Make sure to practice this beforehand too. If you want, you could also have the moderator do the transitioning and introduce all speakers. However, make sure that your transitions are brief, as you don’t want to take up too much time from the main presentation.

Q. HOW DO I END A GROUP PRESENTATION? 

For the ending of the presentation, have the moderator or any other group member step forward again. They can provide a quick summary of the presentation, before thanking the audience and asking them if they have any questions.

The moderator doesn’t have to answer all the questions by themselves: the members can pitch in to answer the question that relates to their individual part. If there’s another group presenting after you, the moderator can conclude by verbally introducing them or saying that the next group will take over now. 

During the end, you could have all the presenters on the stage together, as this will provide a united front to your audience. If you don’t wish to finish the presentation with a Q & A, you could also end it by a call to action.

Or, you could loop back and make a reference to the opening of your presentation, or the main part of your speech. If you’d set up a question at the beginning, now would be a good time to answer it. This will increase the impact of your speech.

Make sure that the closing words aren’t vague. The audience should know it’s the end of the presentation, and not like you’re keeping them hanging for something more. Make sure to thank and acknowledge your audience, and any other speakers or dignitaries present. Lastly, just like the opening and the transitioning, practice the ending before you step onto the stage!  

Want some inspiration for closing lines? Check out our article on 15 Powerful Speech Ending Lines (And Tips To Create Your Own).

Q. HOW DO I INTRODUCE THE NEXT SPEAKER IN A GROUP PRESENTATION? 

There are many ways by which you can introduce the next speaker in the presentation. For starters, you could wrap up your presentation by simply summarizing what you said (make sure it’s a brief summary) and then saying the other speaker will take over from this point.

Or, you could finish with your topic and then give a brief introduction of the next speaker and what they’re going to be talking about. The introduction can be simply the name of the speaker, or you could also provide a brief description of them and their achievements if any.

To lighten the mood, you could even add a fun fact about the speaker in your introduction–this is, of course, provided that you’re both comfortable with it. You could also ask for a round of applause to welcome them onto the stage.

However you choose to approach the transition, make sure that your introduction is short, and not more than two minutes at the maximum. Remember that it’s the next speaker’s turn to speak–not yours. If you’re the incoming speaker, make sure to thank the speaker who introduced you. You could also respond to their description or fun fact about you. A smile doesn’t hurt, either!

Conclusion 

To sum up, while group presentations might seem daunting at first, if planned and executed properly, they don’t have to be difficult at all! On the contrary, they can make the presentation a more seamless and fun experience overall. By doing thorough preparation in advance, dividing the work properly, as well as staying vigilant and supportive during the presentation, you can execute your next group presentation as easily as an individual project! 

Hrideep Barot

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5 Powerful Group Presentation Examples + Guide to Nail Your Next Talk

5 Powerful Group Presentation Examples + Guide to Nail Your Next Talk

Leah Nguyen • 27 Jan 2024 • 5 min read

A group presentation is a chance to combine your superpowers, brainstorm like mad geniuses, and deliver a presentation that’ll have your audience begging for an encore.

That’s the gist of it.

It can also be a disaster if it’s not done right. Fortunately, we have awesome group presentation examples to help you get the hang of it💪.

Table of Contents

What is a good group presentation, #1. delivering a successful team presentation, #2. athletetrax team presentation, #3. bumble – 1st place – 2017 national business plan competition, #4. 2019 final round yonsei university, #5. 1st place | macy’s case competition, bottom line, frequently asked questions, tips for audience engagement.

  • 💡 10 Interactive Presentation Techniques for Engagement
  • 💡 220++ Easy Topics for Presentation of all Ages
  • 💡 Complete Guide to Interactive Presentations
  • Time management presentation
  • Introduce team member

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Group presentation example

Here are some key aspects of a good group presentation:

• Organisation – The presentation should follow a logical flow, with a clear introduction, body, and conclusion. An outline or roadmap shown upfront helps guide the audience.

• Visual aids – Use slides, videos, diagrams, etc. to enhance the presentation and keep it engaging. But avoid overly packed slides with too much text. For the sake of convenience of quickly sharing the content, you can attach a QR code directly in your presentation using slides QR code generator for this goal.

• Speaking skills – Speak clearly, at an appropriate pace and volume. Make eye contact with the audience. Limit filler words and verbal tics.

• Participation – All group members should contribute to the presentation in an active and balanced way. They should speak in an integrated, conversational manner.

• Content – The material should be relevant, informative, and at an appropriate level for the audience. Good research and preparation ensure accuracy.

• Interaction – Involve the audience through questions, demonstrations, polls, or activities. This helps keep their attention and facilitates learning.

• Time management – Stay within the allotted time through careful planning and time checks. Have someone in the group monitor the clock.

• Audience focus – Consider the audience’s needs and perspective. Frame the material in a way that is relevant and valuable to them.

• Conclusion – Provide a strong summary of the main points and takeaways. Leave the audience with key messages they’ll remember from your presentation.

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Engage your audience in real-time. Let them imprint your presentation in their head with revolutionising interactive slides!

Best Group Presentation Examples

To give you a good idea of what a good group presentation is, here are some specific examples for you to learn from.

The video provides helpful examples and recommendations to illustrate each of these tips for improving team presentations.

The speaker recommends preparing thoroughly as a team, assigning clear roles to each member, and rehearsing multiple times to deliver an effective team presentation that engages the audience.

They speak loudly and clearly, make eye contact with the audience, and avoid reading slides word for word.

The visuals are done properly, with limited text on slides, and relevant images and graphics are used to support key points.

The presentation follows a logical structure, covering the company overview, the problem they are solving, the proposed solution, business model, competition, marketing strategy, finances, and next steps. This makes it easy to follow.

The presenters speak clearly and confidently, make good eye contact with the audience, and avoid simply reading the slides. Their professional demeanor creates a good impression.

They provide a cogent and concise answer to the one question they receive at the end, demonstrating a good understanding of their business plan.

This group nails it with a positive attitude throughout the presentation . Smiles show warmness in opposition to blank stares.

The team cites relevant usage statistics and financial metrics to demonstrate Bumble’s growth potential. This lends credibility to their pitch.

All points are elaborated well, and they switch between members harmoniously.

This group presentation shows that a little stutter initially doesn’t mean it’s the end of the world. They keep going with confidence and carry out the plan flawlessly, which impresses the judging panel.

The team provides clear, supported responses that demonstrate their knowledge and thoughtfulness.

When answering the questions from the judge, they exchange frequent eye contact with them, showing confident manners.

In this video , we can see instantly that each member of the group takes control of the stage they present naturally. They move around, exuding an aura of confidence in what they’re saying.

For an intricate topic like diversity and inclusion, they made their points well-put by backing them up with figures and data.

We hope these group presentation examples will help you and your team members achieve clear communication, organisation, and preparation, along with the ability to deliver the message in an engaging and compelling manner. These factors all contribute to a good group presentation that wow the audience.

What is a group presentation?

A group presentation is a presentation given by multiple people, typically two or more, to an audience. Group presentations are common in academic, business, and organisational settings.

How do you make a group presentation?

To make an effective group presentation, clearly define the objective, assign roles among group members for researching, creating slides, and rehearsing, create an outline with an introduction, 3-5 key points, and a conclusion, and gather relevant facts and examples to support each point, include meaningful visual aids on slides while limiting text, practice your full presentation together and provide each other with feedback, conclude strongly by summarising key takeaways.

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Leah Nguyen

Words that convert, stories that stick. I turn complex ideas into engaging narratives - helping audiences learn, remember, and take action.

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3 Group Presentation Pitfalls — and How to Avoid Them

  • Allison Shapira

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Strategies for a polished, unified final product.

Putting together an effective group presentation takes teamwork and coordination so it doesn’t look like a patchwork quilt. And yet, many of us never budget the time to fully prepare. The author outlines some of the common mistakes people make in group presentations and offers best practices to keep you on track. 

Many of us have experienced poor group presentations. If you’re giving one, it’s the last-minute scramble the night before to decide who is presenting which part of the presentation. If you’re observing one, it’s the chaos of hearing multiple people talking over one another or, even worse, simply reading their slides word-for-word and ignoring their audience. 

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  • Allison Shapira teaches “The Arts of Communication” at the Harvard Kennedy School and is the Founder/CEO of Global Public Speaking, a training firm that helps emerging and established leaders to speak clearly, concisely, and confidently. She is the author of the new book, Speak with Impact: How to Command the Room and Influence Others (HarperCollins Leadership).

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Guide for Giving a Group Presentation

February 21, 2018 - Dom Barnard

In certain academic and business situations, it is more valuable to deliver a group presentation than a solo one. Many people prefer group presentations because there is less pressure on the individual. However there are also unique challenges, such as having to ensure multiple individuals collaborate in order to produce a cohesive piece of work.

Preparing for the group presentation

As with any presentation, there is a significant amount of work during the preparation stage. The group must be well organised because there are multiple individuals, and therefore multiple personalities involved.

Presentation moderator

To assist with organisation, the group should first decide on a presentation moderator – this is essentially the “leader”. The presentation moderator can have the final say when decision-making is needed and, during the Q&A portion of the presentation, can decide which speakers will answer certain questions.

Understanding the audience

To make your presentation engaging you need to  think about the audience  so you can tailor it towards their needs. How much will the audience already know about this topic? What will they want to get from this presentation?

For example, if you are presenting the topic of building a bridge to a group of civil engineers, you can confidently use technical language. However, if you are presenting to secondary school students, you would need to use simpler language and not explain the methods in as much detail.

The presentation’s purpose

As a group, ensure you agree on the purpose of the presentation so that you all understand the message that needs to be conveyed e.g. “We want to find out which treatment works best for social anxiety.” Deciding on your message means that the group can start building key points around this – just keep in mind that each subtopic must contribute to the presentation’s aim.

Divide the presentation

The presentation needs to be  divided into main areas  so there is a clear beginning, middle and end. This is where can you decide on the order of the subtopics. Presentations usually follow this structure:

1. Introduction:

  • It is useful to agree on the first minute of the presentation as a team. This is because the audience should be interested from the start and convinced to listen.
  • The presentation’s aims are also discussed and an overview of the presentation’s structure is provided. For example, “We set out to explore the effectiveness of different treatments for social anxiety. We will first cover the symptoms and prevalence of social anxiety, before explaining the different treatments. This will then lead into a discussion about the pros and cons of each treatment route. Finally, we will explain which treatment route we decided was the most effective for this disorder.”

2. One or two middle sections:

  • These sections consist of providing the information that addresses your presentation’s aim.
  • There can be more of these sections depending on your topic.

3. Conclusion:

  • After summarising all of the key points, there must be a clear conclusion. It is beneficial to appoint the conclusion to the best speaker as this is where all the information is pooled together.

After segmenting the presentation, a time sequence can be created so the group understands the order in which tasks must be completed. It is important to set deadlines for this.

Share responsibility

A frequent problem when working within a group is unequal participation as this can subsequently cause disharmony.

But this is easily avoidable by assigning each speaker a section of the presentation to work on depending on their interests. This means that each speaker should be doing the research for their section and putting together a speech and slides (if being used).

  • It is important to specify exactly what each group member should be doing with their time.
  • Make sure the length of time per speaker is agreed on.
  • Do not change speakers more than necessary because this can reduce the coherency of the presentation.

Build the presentation together

For an audience to follow and enjoy a presentation, it must flow together. Meeting up and building the presentation helps with this because:

  • This prevents the duplication of content.
  • You can put the slides together, although only one individual should be responsible for merging the slides so there is consistency within the presentation.
  • It is useful to receive feedback on the speeches before presenting to an audience.
  • The team can agree on any edits.
  • The team can agree on the conclusion.
  • You can make sure that each speaker will talk for the same amount of time and cover a similar amount of information.
  • The team can come up with the first minute of the presentation together.

Business people giving a group presentation

Use stories to engage the audience

A good presentation opening could  start with a story  to highlight why your topic is significant. For example, if the topic is on the benefits of pets on physical and psychological health, you could present a story or a study about an individual whose quality of life significantly improved after being given a dog.

The audience is more likely to remember this story than a list of facts and statistics so try and incorporate relevant stories into presentations.

Know what each speaker will say

Each speaker must know what the other group members will say as this prevents repetition and it may be useful to refer to a previous speaker to assist in explaining your own section.

Also, if a team member is unable to attend on the day it will be easier to find cover within the group.

Write and practice transitions

Clean transitioning between speakers can also assist in producing a presentation that flows well. One way of doing this is:

  • Briefly recap on what you covered in your section: “So that was a brief introduction on what social anxiety is and how it can affect somebody”
  • Introduce the next speaker in the team and explain what they will discuss: “Now Sarah will talk about the prevalence of social anxiety.”
  • Then end by looking at the next speaker, gesturing towards them and saying their name: “Sarah”.
  • The next speaker should acknowledge this with a quick: “Thank you Nick.”

From this example you can see how the different sections of the presentations link which makes it easier for the audience to follow and remain engaged.

Practice the presentation

Rehearse with the group multiple times to make sure:

  • The structure works
  • Everyone is sticking to their timing.
  • To see if any edits are needed.

The more you  rehearse a presentation  the more you will feel comfortable presenting the material and answering questions as your familiarity with the content increases.

Handling nerves before the presentation

It is  natural to feel nervous  when presenting in front of others, regardless of the size of the audience. Here are some tips:

  • Remind yourself that the audience is there to listen to you and wants you to do well; there is no need to be afraid of them.
  • Remember that the audience members will have to present their projects later and are almost certainly feeling just as nervous.
  • Practicing with your group and practicing your section at home will make you more comfortable and familiar with the material and increase your confidence.
  • Practice pauses  – when people feel nervous they tend to find silences uncomfortable and try to fill gaps, such as using “um” multiple times (filler words). Practicing pauses will help the silences feel less unnatural when you present therefore reducing the need for filler words.
  • When we are nervous we often begin breathing quickly and this in turn can increase our anxiety. Controlled breathing is a common technique that helps slow down your breathing to normal thus reducing your anxiety.

Exercises to control your breathing:

  • Sit down in an upright position as it easier for your lungs to fill with air
  • Breathe in through your nose and into your abdomen for four seconds
  • Hold this breathe for two seconds
  • Breathe out through your nose for six seconds
  • Wait a few seconds before inhaling and repeating the cycle

During the group presentation

Introducing the team.

The presentation should begin with the presentation moderator introducing the team. This is smoother than each individual presenting themselves.

Pay attention to the presentation

You may feel nervous as you wait for your turn to speak but try to listen to the presentation. The audience is able to see the whole team so it is important that you look interested in what is being said and react to it, even if you have heard it multiple times.

Body language and eye contact

Body language is a useful tool to engage the audience:

  • If it is your turn to speak then stand slightly in the foreground of the rest of your group.
  • Smile at the audience as this will make you look more confident.
  • Make eye contact  as this helps you engage with the audience.
  • Keep your arms uncrossed so your body language is more open.
  • Do not look down and read from your notes- glancing down occasionally is fine but keep in mind that you are talking to the audience.
  • This is the same for  presenting visual aids ; you may need to glance at the computer slide but make sure you predominantly face the audience as you are still speaking to them.
  • Keep your hands at your sides but use them occasionally to gesture.

Vocal variety

How you say something is just as is important as the content of your speech –  arguably, more so . For example, if an individual presented on a topic very enthusiastically the audience would probably enjoy this compared to someone who covered more points but mumbled into their notes.

Here are some pointers:

  • Adapt your voice depending on what are you saying- if you want to highlight something then raise your voice or lower your voice for intensity.
  • Avoid speaking in monotone.
  • Sound enthusiastic – the more you sound like you care about the topic, the more the audience will listen.
  • Speak loudly and clearly.
  • If you notice that you are speaking quickly, pause and slow down.
  • Warm up your voice  before a speech

Breath deeply for vocal variety

Take short pauses and breath deeply. This will ensure you have more vocal variety.

Handling nerves during the presentation

  • If you find that you are too uncomfortable to give audience members direct eye contact, a helpful technique is to look directly over the heads of the audience as this gives the impression of eye contact.
  • Try not to engage in nervous behaviours e.g. shifting your weight or fidgeting.
  • Remember that it’s unlikely that the audience knows that you are feeling nervous – you do not look as anxious as you feel.
  • Notice whether you are speaking too quickly as this tends to happen when nervousness increases. If you are, pause and then slow down.

Strong conclusion

Since the conclusion is the last section of your presentation the audience is more likely to remember it. Summarise the key points and lead into a clear concluding statement. For example, if your presentation was on the impact of social media on self-esteem you could list all the main points covered in the presentation and conclude “Therefore, from the amount of evidence and also from the quality of evidence, we have decided that social media is negatively/positively impacting self-esteem.”

Questions and answer session

The questions and answers session after the main presentation can be a source of anxiety as it is often difficult to predict what questions will be asked. But working within a group setting means that individually you do not have to know everything about the topic.

When an  audience member asks a question , the presentation moderator can refer a speaker who has the relevant knowledge to provide an answer. This avoids any hesitant pauses.

If you are answering group presentation questions:

  • Pause before answering- take the time to gather your thoughts and think about your answer
  • Make sure you answer the question- sometimes you may start providing more information than necessary. Keeping answers as concise as possible will help with this.
  • Ask the questioner for clarification if you do not understand- it’s better to ask rather than answering in a way that does not address the question.
  • You’re not expected to know everything- challenging questions will emerge and if you do not know the answer you can respond with: “That’s a really good question, I’m not certain so let me look into that.”

Ending the presentation

A good ending usually consists of the presentation moderator thanking the audience. If there is another group afterwards they should transition to the next group.

  • November 2, 2023

Mastering Group Presentations: A Comprehensive Guide

  • Public Speaking

I n certain academic and business situations, delivering a group presentation can be more valuable than a solo one. Not only does it help alleviate the pressure on individuals, but it also promotes collaboration and the production of cohesive work. However, preparing for a group presentation requires careful organization and understanding of the audience . In this comprehensive guide, we will explore the key steps to master group presentations, from preparation to delivery, and provide practical tips for success.

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Preparing for the Group Presentation

Like any presentation, a group presentation requires significant preparation. The key to success lies in organizing the group effectively, considering multiple personalities and ensuring a cohesive final product.

Choosing a Presentation Moderator

To facilitate organization, the group should appoint a presentation moderator, essentially the “leader” of the group. The presentation moderator has the final say in decision-making and can allocate speakers for specific questions during the Q&A session.

Understanding the Audience

To make a presentation engaging, it is crucial to consider the audience and tailor the content to their needs. Assessing the audience’s prior knowledge and expectations of the topic helps determine the appropriate level of technicality and detail. For example, presenting the topic of bridge building to civil engineers allows for the use of technical language, while presenting to secondary school students requires simpler explanations.

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Defining the Presentation’s Purpose

Before diving into the content, the group must agree on the purpose of the presentation. Defining a clear message ensures that all subtopics contribute to the overall aim. For example, if the presentation aims to explore the effectiveness of different treatments for social anxiety, the group can build key points around this central theme.

Dividing the Presentation

A well-structured presentation should have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Divide the content into main sections, carefully considering the order of subtopics. The typical presentation structure includes:

  • Introduction: The first minute of the presentation should capture the audience’s interest and provide an overview of the presentation’s structure. Clearly state the aims and objectives, such as exploring the effectiveness of different treatments for social anxiety.
  • Middle Sections: These sections address the main points of the presentation, providing information that supports the overall aim. Depending on the topic, there can be one or more middle sections.
  • Conclusion : Summarize the key points and present a clear conclusion that ties everything together. Assign this section to the best speaker who can effectively synthesize the information presented.

Establishing a time sequence and setting deadlines for each task within the presentation ensures smooth progress and timely completion.

Sharing Responsibility

Unequal participation within a group can lead to disharmony and reduced cohesion in the presentation. Avoid this by assigning each speaker a specific section to work on based on their interests and expertise. Clear expectations and time management guidelines should be communicated to all group members.

Building the Presentation Together

To ensure a cohesive and seamless presentation, it is crucial to build it together as a group. This collaborative approach offers several benefits:

Avoiding Duplication of Content

By working together, the group can avoid duplicating content and ensure that each speaker’s section seamlessly connects with the others. This prevents confusion and maintains a coherent flow throughout the presentation.

Creating Consistency in Slides

While each speaker can work on their own slides, one individual should be responsible for merging them to ensure consistency in design and formatting. Collaboration enables feedback and edits to be made collectively, resulting in a polished final product.

Receiving Feedback

Meeting up to build the presentation allows for valuable feedback on speeches before presenting to an audience. The group can collectively review and refine each speaker’s content, ensuring clarity and relevance.

Establishing a Unified Conclusion

Building the presentation together enables the group to agree on the concluding section. This ensures that all key points are summarized effectively and the presentation concludes with a strong and cohesive ending.

Maintaining Balanced Speaking Time

By working together, the group can ensure that each speaker talks for a similar amount of time and covers a similar amount of information. This balance enhances the overall flow of the presentation and keeps the audience engaged .

Crafting a Compelling Opening

To captivate the audience from the start, consider opening the presentation with a relevant and engaging story. For example, when discussing the benefits of pets on physical and psychological health, share a story or study about someone whose quality of life significantly improved after getting a pet. Incorporating stories into presentations helps make them more memorable and relatable.

Knowing Each Speaker’s Content

To avoid repetition and promote seamless transitions, each speaker should be aware of what the other group members will say. This knowledge allows for cross-referencing between sections, enhancing the coherence and flow of the presentation. Additionally, if a team member is unable to attend, it becomes easier to find a replacement within the group.

Writing and Practicing Transitions

Smooth transitions between speakers contribute to a well-structured and engaging presentation. When transitioning, briefly recap the previous section, introduce the next speaker and their topic, and gesture towards them to signal the handover. Practice these transitions to ensure a seamless flow and keep the audience engaged throughout the presentation.

Rehearsing the Presentation

Rehearsing the presentation multiple times as a group is essential for success. This practice allows the group to evaluate the structure, timing, and content of the presentation. It also increases familiarity with the material, boosting confidence and improving responses to questions. Regular rehearsal sessions help the group identify any necessary edits and ensure a polished delivery.

Handling Nerves Before the Presentation

Nervousness before a presentation is natural, regardless of the audience size. Here are some tips to manage pre-presentation nerves:

Remind Yourself of the Audience’s Expectations

Remember that the audience is there to listen and wants you to succeed. They are likely to empathize with your nerves, as they may also have their own presentations to deliver. Recognizing this shared experience can help alleviate anxiety.

Practice and Familiarize Yourself with the Material

Practicing with your group and rehearsing your section at home builds familiarity and confidence. It allows you to become comfortable with the content and delivery, reducing anxiety.

Focus on Controlled Breathing

Nervousness can lead to rapid breathing, increasing anxiety levels. Practicing controlled breathing techniques can help regulate your breathing and reduce anxiety. Before the presentation, sit upright and take deep breaths in through your nose, filling your abdomen. Hold the breath for a few seconds, then exhale through your nose for a longer duration. Repeat this cycle to calm your nerves .

Avoid Filler Words

When nervous, people tend to use filler words like “um” and “uh” to fill gaps in their speech. Practice pausing instead of using filler words. Embrace the silence and speak deliberately, allowing your words to convey your message effectively.

During the Group Presentation

Once the presentation begins, there are several key considerations to ensure a confident and engaging delivery.

Introduce the Team

The presentation should start with the presentation moderator introducing the team, rather than each individual introducing themselves. This approach creates a smoother transition into the content and enhances the overall cohesion of the presentation.

Pay Attention to the Presentation

While waiting for your turn to speak, actively listen to your colleagues’ presentations. Display interest and engagement in their content, even if you have heard it before. This non-verbal support contributes to a positive group dynamic and keeps the audience engaged.

Utilize Body Language and Eye Contact

Body language is a powerful tool for engaging the audience. When it’s your turn to speak, stand slightly in the foreground of the group, smile at the audience, and make eye contact. Keep your arms uncrossed and avoid looking down at your notes or slides. Instead, face the audience and maintain eye contact as you speak.

Vocal Variety

How you deliver your speech is just as important as the content itself. Adapt your voice to emphasize important points, raise or lower your voice for intensity, and avoid speaking in a monotone manner. Sound enthusiastic and confident, as your tone can significantly impact audience engagement. Speak loudly and clearly, ensuring that everyone can hear you. If you notice yourself speaking too quickly, pause and slow down to maintain clarity.

Warm Up Your Voice

Before starting the presentation, warm up your voice by taking short pauses and breathing deeply. This exercise helps you achieve vocal variety and ensures that your voice remains clear and strong throughout the presentation.

Managing Nervous Behaviors

It’s natural to feel nervous during a presentation, but it’s important to manage nervous behaviors. Avoid shifting your weight or fidgeting, as these actions can distract the audience. Remember that the audience is unlikely to perceive your anxiety as strongly as you feel it.

Delivering a Strong Conclusion

The conclusion is a critical part of the presentation, as it is the last section the audience will remember. Summarize the key points and lead into a clear concluding statement that reinforces the main message. For example, when discussing the impact of social media on self-esteem, list the main points covered and conclude with a definitive statement based on the evidence presented.

Handling Questions and Answer Sessions

The Q&A session after the main presentation can be challenging, as the questions asked may be unpredictable. However, working as a group allows for a distributed knowledge base and ensures that each question is addressed by the most knowledgeable speaker. When answering questions:

  • Pause before responding to gather your thoughts.
  • Focus on directly answering the question without providing unnecessary information.
  • If you don’t understand a question, ask for clarification to avoid providing irrelevant answers.
  • It’s okay not to have all the answers. If you’re unsure, acknowledge it and offer to follow up with additional research.

Ending the Presentation

A strong ending is crucial to leave a lasting impression. The presentation moderator should thank the audience and, if applicable, smoothly transition to the next group or topic. This final gesture provides closure and ensures a professional conclusion to the presentation.

Mastering group presentations requires effective organization, collaboration, and preparation. By following the steps outlined in this comprehensive guide, you can confidently navigate the process from start to finish. Remember to choose a presentation moderator, understand your audience , divide the presentation into sections, share responsibilities, build the presentation together, utilize stories to engage the audience , practice transitions, manage nerves, and deliver a strong conclusion. With practice and a collaborative mindset, you can excel in group presentations and effectively communicate your message to diverse audiences . So, embrace the opportunity to work as a team, learn from one another, and grow your public speaking skills through group presentations .

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Key Takeaways

I. Introduction A. Importance of group presentations in academic and business contexts B. Benefits of group presentations, including pressure alleviation, collaboration, and cohesive work C. Overview of the comprehensive guide

II. Preparing for the Group Presentation A. Choosing a Presentation Moderator B. Understanding the Audience C. Defining the Presentation’s Purpose D. Dividing the Presentation E. Sharing Responsibility F. Building the Presentation Together G. Crafting a Compelling Opening H. Knowing Each Speaker’s Content I. Writing and Practicing Transitions J. Rehearsing the Presentation K. Handling Nerves Before the Presentation

III. During the Group Presentation A. Introduce the Team B. Pay Attention to the Presentation C. Utilize Body Language and Eye Contact D. Vocal Variety and Warm-Up Exercises E. Managing Nervous Behaviors F. Delivering a Strong Conclusion G. Handling Questions and Answer Sessions H. Ending the Presentation

IV. Conclusion A. Recap of key points in mastering group presentations B. Encouragement to embrace teamwork and collaborative learning C. Call to action: Build career skills online with public speaking classes and executive coaching

V. Call to Action A. Invitation to start a free trial for online public speaking classes and courses B. Information on how to access executive coaching and business coaching services

This comprehensive guide provides a step-by-step approach to mastering group presentations, emphasizing the importance of organization, collaboration, and preparation. By following the outlined strategies, individuals can confidently deliver engaging and impactful presentations, enhancing their public speaking skills and professional development.

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How to Give a Great Group Presentation

A Little Preparation Can Go a Long Way

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Whether for an introductory course, internship, or senior seminar, group presentations are part of everyone's college experience and can be a source of very real anxiety. Next time you are assigned a group presentation, don't panic—instead, embrace the opportunity to learn and demonstrate your abilities. Read to find out what you can do to make your next group presentation memorable.

Distribute the Work Evenly

The first step to planning an A-worthy presentation is to make sure everyone carries their own weight, though this is easier said than done. This step will set your presentation up for success but can be challenging to pull off. It is likely that at least some of the people in your group will have unmatched academic abilities and work ethics, but this problem can be overcome.

Outline the work that needs to be done for the whole project and divvy up roles based on what people are comfortable doing. Make the expectations of each person clear so that there is accountability from start to finish—if something gets sloppily finished or is left entirely undone, the issue can be traced back to whatever group member is responsible and handled accordingly. If necessary, discuss problems with the professor . Don't let one person's laziness sabotage your entire group's work.

Schedule Deadlines and Rehearsals in Advance

As a college student, it can be incredibly difficult to manage your own time let alone synchronize the schedules of several different group members. Planning to get together as far in advance as possible makes it less likely that other commitments are prioritized over important group planning time.

At your first group meeting, set a timeline for when things need to be done. Schedule meetings, deadlines, and rehearsals as far into the future as the assignment allows. Never plan to cram at an all-night stress fest the night before—tired and over-extended group members will have a hard time executing even the most well-planned presentation.

Present Together

Just as you should use the strengths and weaknesses of group members to assign planning roles before the presentation, you should consider the abilities of every group member when deciding how the presentation itself should actually be delivered. Cohesion is crucial to a great presentation. People will notice if one or more group members do not speak or the presentation gets off-topic each time a new person takes over, and weak delivery does not bode well for your grade.

When you are planning how you will present, ask yourself and your group members the following questions:

  • What is the best way to deliver this material?
  • What presenting strengths does each group member have?
  • What goals must be met during the presentation?
  • How will we divide and conquer scripting the presentation?
  • What will we do if the presentation gets off-topic or a member forgets their part?

Prepare for Emergencies

Hopefully, you have put the time into creating an outstanding presentation, so don't let small hiccups derail it. Make sure that you know each other's responsibilities well enough to take over for them in times of crisis.

You never know when someone will get unexpectedly sick , face a family emergency, or be otherwise unable to show up for a presentation. Have a system in place where one group member can serve as an understudy for another group member so that your presentation does not crash and burn if someone is not there. Make the most of your preparations by planning for any scenario and remember to work as a team when things go wrong.

For a crisp presentation that leaves a strong impression on your professor and classmates, you need to rehearse. At least one run-through from beginning to end can smooth out any wrinkles, help nervous members overcome their fear, and ensure that you haven't left anything out.

Go through your parts as planned and offer each other constructive feedback immediately after. This may be uncomfortable, but helpful peer feedback can prevent negative feedback and bad grades from professors. Frame comments to members positively with a "glow and a grow": one thing they did really well and one area for improvement.

You should also discuss a dress code right before you rehearse so that all group members don the appropriate attire for the occasion. Lend each other clothes to help each other out if needed.

Stay Present During the Presentation

As long as your group is up there presenting, you need to be giving the presentation your all. This means that, even if your part is over, you should remain alert, engaged, and undistracted. This will make your presentation look and sound better while also enabling seamless emergency transitions. If you pay attention to your whole presentation, you will be much better prepared to step in for someone that needs rescuing—also, odds are that everyone else (professor included) will be more likely to pay attention if they see you paying attention.

Group presentations can be very effortful and time-consuming, so celebration is definitely in order once it's over. Reward yourself as a team for a job well done to bond after the potentially traumatizing experience you have shared.

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Tips for Presenting with a Group

Group Presentations: 7 Tips for Presenting With a Group

Presenting as a team is a complex exercise that requires diplomacy, respect, and many human qualities. A group team is composed of individuals where each one has a character and history.

The role of the leader within it is decisive. Each team member must feel in their place and work not only for their own interests but also for a common goal; they must adhere to values to succeed in the work.

Working alone is an opportunity that requires discipline; however, working as a group requires twice of it; all members must be aware of their limitations so that they do not hold them back.

Group Presentations: 7 Tips for Presenting With a Grou p

1. set a criteria to select the members.

Choose your partners and form a balanced group of up to four people, with about the same level, to avoid wasting time on adjustments. Don’t forget to cross-check experiences and personalities so that everyone can help and be helped in turn.

Do not choose only close friends, and surround yourself with motivated and serious people who know each other a minimum.

2. BE ORGANIZED!

Be clear about the work objectives and how they are distributed. Similarly, give yourself a time limit. Each person must ensure that they have a clear understanding of their missions and what role the group expects from them.

Assign individual tasks based on their skills. Also, set meeting rules to improve efficiency, such as turning off laptops, taking notes, scheduling, preparing for meetings, etc.

For successful group presentation, each team member needs to know their role and what they can bring; the objectives to be achieved must therefore be clearly defined, precisely defined, and must, of course, be achievable. Having common objectives clearly stated and well understood helps increase motivation and build a strong team spirit.

But the ultimate goal of the project towards which teamwork must aim may sometimes seem distant and less concrete. In this case, it is crucial to define steps to be achieved gradually, with always clear and precise goals.

3. Outstanding performance is linked to a great leader.

The leader holds an essential role, and it can be a demanding one since he must be firm without being authoritarian. Within the team, he defines the objectives and sets the limits for the smooth functioning of the group.

The leader ensures the project as all tasks are distributed between all teammates; a fantastic group also clarifies mutual respect’s needs and boundaries. 

Excellent teamwork and leadership ensure outstanding performance because work can be a source of conflict, and the team can go through tensions. However, in a project, the group’s cohesion and teamwork often make a difference.

4. Communication: the key to performance

Communication and teamwork are inseparable; internal communication is one of the basic rules of cooperation. Once again, everyone needs to know what their mission and objectives are.

This makes it easier to help solve a potential problem or to know who to ask for help when needed.

It is essential to listen to others and not make judgments. Everyone works and thinks differently, even if the team uses standard tools and references.

By knowing how to listen, it is possible to learn from others and find together the best solution to achieve the goal. So don’t just focus on how you would have done this or that and consider all the ideas, even the craziest sometimes.

5. Start with individual work

As soon as you find out what the subject of the presentation is, it is appropriate to start with individual work; this lends itself, for example, to the reading of texts to be discussed by the group. Unique work upstream is a fundamental principle of collaborative learning.

This allows intense exchanges in the group because each student can bring the result of an individual’s work and reflection. 

Group work is particularly effective when group members have worked previously on documents that complement each other. The group work then begins with a debriefing of participants.

Mutual listening, cooperation, and integration of all take place spontaneously and without a long start-up time.

6. Set a time to deliberate with your group

Group work is less rentable if time is too short; groups need time to organize their work, interact and prepare their presentation. Time certainly decreases with routine practice, but it is essential when groups are formed randomly.

A reasonable minimum time is obtained by multiplying the time by the number of participants. Groups of three should have at least 9 minutes available.

7. Prioritize rehearsal presentations

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10 Public Speaking Tips for First-Timers

10 Public Speaking Tips for First-Timers

Presenting in-group makes it possible to confront ideas. Teamwork also helps to foster the development of team skills, limit risks in the event of absence, and develop collective intelligence.

Reference and Further Reading

AcethePresentation. AmadeBai, Emidio. 14 Types of Speech and Easy Tips to Master Them.

AcethePresentation. AmadeBai, Emidio. What Makes A Bad Public Speaker? Top 10 Worst Traits To Avoid

JUPILLE, Rémy. Business Secrets Podcast.

Top Tips for Effective Presentations. Skills you need.

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16 Presenting as a Group

Learning Objectives

  • List the four common types of group presentations
  • Discuss techniques for coordinating a group assignment
  • Plan speech organization for the intended audience
  • Practice effective group delivery

Imagine you have been assigned to a group for a project requiring a presentation at the end. “Now is the busiest time in my schedule and I do not have time to fit all these people into it,” the voice in your head reminds you. Then you ask the question: “Is there ever a non-busy time for assembling a group together for a presentation ?” These thoughts are a part of a group presentation assignment. The combined expertise of several individuals is becoming increasingly necessary in many vocational (related to a specific occupation) and avocational (outside a specific occupation) presentations.

Group presentations in business may range from a business team exchanging sales data; research and development teams discussing business expansion ideas; to annual report presentations by boards of directors. Also, the government, private, and public sectors have many committees that participate in briefings, conference presentations, and other formal presentations. It is common for group presentations to be requested, created, and delivered to bring together the expertise of several people in one presentation. Thus, the task of deciding the most valuable information for audience members has become a coordination task involving several individuals. All group members are responsible for coordinating things such as themes, strong support/evidence, and different personalities and approaches in a specified time period. Coordination is defined in the dictionary as harmonious combination or interaction, as of functions or parts.

This chapter focuses on how the group, the speech assignment, the audience, and the presentation design play a role in the harmonious combination of planning, organization, and delivery for group presentations.

Preparing All Parts of the Assignment

In group presentations, you are working to coordinate one or two outcomes—outcomes related to the content (product outcomes) and/or outcomes related to the group skills and participation (process outcomes). Therefore, it is important to carefully review and outline the prescribed assignment of the group before you get large quantities of data, spreadsheets, interview notes, and other research materials.

Types of Group Presentations

A key component of a preparation plan is the type of group presentation. Not all group presentations require a format of standing in front of an audience and presenting. According to Sprague and Stuart (2005), there are four common types of group presentations:

  • A structured argument in which participants speak for or against a pre-announced proposition is called a debate . The proposition is worded so that one side has the burden of proof, and that same side has the benefit of speaking first and last. Speakers assume an advocacy role and attempt to persuade the audience, not each other.
  • The forum is essentially a question-and-answer session. One or more experts may be questioned by a panel of other experts, journalists, and/or the audience.
  • A panel consists of a group of experts publicly discussing a topic among themselves. Individually prepared speeches, if any, are limited to very brief opening statements.
  • Finally, the symposium is a series of short speeches, usually informative, on various aspects of the same general topic. Audience questions often follow (p. 318).

These four types of presentations, along with the traditional group presentation in front of an audience or on-the-job speaking, typically have pre-assigned parameters. Therefore, all group members must be clear about the assignment request.

A man stands at a microphone while moderating a panel discussion of four peoiple who are seated at a table

Establishing Clear Objectives

For the group to accurately summarize for themselves who is the audience, what is the situation/occasion, and what supporting materials need to be located and selected, the group should establish clear objectives about both the process and the product being assessed.

Assessment plays a central role in optimizing the quality of group interaction. Thus, it is important to be clear whether the group is being assessed on the product(s) or outcome(s) only or will the processes within the group—such as equity of contribution, individual interaction with group members, and meeting deadlines—also be assessed. Kowitz and Knutson (1980) argue that three dimensions for group evaluation include (1) informational —dealing with the group’s designated tasks; (2) procedural —referring to how the group coordinates its activities and communication; and (3) interpersonal —focusing on the relationships that exist among members while the task is being accomplished. Groups without a pre-assigned assessment rubric may use the three dimensions to effectively create a group evaluation instrument.

The group should determine if the product includes both a written document and an oral presentation. The written document and oral presentation format may have been pre-assigned with an expectation behind the requested informative and/or persuasive content. Although the two should complement each other, the audience, message, and format for each should be clearly outlined. The group may create a product assessment guide (see Table 1) . Additionally, each group member should uniformly write down the purpose of the assignment. You may think you can keep the purpose in your head without any problem. Yet the goal is for each member to consistently have the same outcome in front of them. This will bring your research, writing, and thinking back to focus after engaging in a variety of resources or conversations.

Once the assignment has been coordinated in terms of the product and process objectives, type of presentation, and logistics, it is important for the group to clearly write down the agreed outcomes. Agreed outcomes about the product include a purpose statemen t that reflects an agreement with the prescribed assignment (i.e. “at the end of our group presentation the audience will be informed or persuaded about the prescribed assignment”). It also includes the key message or thesis to be developed through a presentation outline , a full-sentence outline of virtually everything the speaker intends to say. The outline allows the speakers to test the structure, the logic, and persuasive appeals in the speech (DiSanza & Legge, 2011, p. 131).

Logistics for Group Members

As a group, be very clear about the length of your presentation and its preparation. The length of the presentation refers to your time limit, and whether there is a question and answer period involved. Assignment preparation may or may not have a prescribed deadline. If the assignment does not have a deadline, then set one as a group. If there is a deadline, then the group begins by creating a schedule from the final deadline. As a group, create an action timetable explicitly listing all processes and outputs, as well as communication update points.

As a group, decide the best way to leave enough time in the end to put all the pieces together and make sure everything is complete. If there is a written document, it should be completed prior to the oral presentation rather than at the same time. As a group, realize not everyone may work off a physical calendar. Thus, do not hesitate to require each member to write down all deadlines.

Next, the group can strategically add meeting dates, times, and venues to the action timetable. A meeting is a structured conversation among a small group of people who gather to accomplish a specific task (Beebe & Mottet, 2010). For group presentations, meetings do not always include the entire group. So a schedule of who meets with whom and when is useful for planning work and agendas. In addition, all meetings do not serve the same purpose. For example, informational meetings may be called simply to update all group members; solicitation meetings are called to solicit opinions or request guidance from group members; group-building meetings are designed to promote unity and cohesiveness among group members; and problem-solving meetings result in making decisions or recommendations by the time the meeting convenes.

Once the group is unified about the assignment objectives and time frame, it is vital to predetermine the type of note-taking required of each group member (which may vary) and the variety of information exchange. The more systematic a group is in these two areas, the more unified the process and the product. The system begins with each group member writing down the message, specific purpose, and central ideas for the group presentation. If these are still to be determined, then have each group member identify the areas of background information needed and basic information gathering. Next, simply create a general format for note-taking—whether typed or handwritten and what types of details should be included especially sources. Also with the increasing use of electronic databases be very clear on when related articles should be forwarded to group members. The email inbox flooded with PDF files is not always a welcome situation.

The group should be clear on the explicit requirements for locating recent, relevant, and audience-appropriate source material for the presentation. All of this leads to the foundation of clearly defining the responsibilities of each group member. All tasks should be listed, given deadlines, and assigned people. A means for tracking the progress of each task should be outlined. The group should be clear on what are individual, joint (involving more than one group member), and entire group tasks. Throughout the entire process, all group members should be supportive and helpful but should not offer to do other people’s work.

Organizing for Your Audience

Organizing for your audience relates to how the gathered content can be best arranged for them. According to Patricia Fripp (2011), a Hall of Fame keynote speaker and executive speech coach, any presentation can be intimidating but the key is to remember “your goal is to present the most valuable information possible to the members of the audience” (p. 16). Now what you think is most valuable and what the audience thinks is most valuable must be coordinated because of differences in perception (the process by which we give meaning to our experience). Therefore, organizing for your audience is focused on content, structure, packaging, and human element—not for you, not for the assignment, but for the audience. A customized plan of organization will assist your group in creating relevant messages that satisfy others’ personal needs and goals (Keller, 1983).

Audience members are interested in your expertise that has been developed from solid research and preparation. Audience members may have expectations about what foundational literature and key sources should be contained within your presentation. Therefore as a group, you need to go beyond providing a variety of supporting material within your presentation to considering who will be present, levels of expertise, and their expectations. In general, organizing the content should be focused on usage, knowledge levels, and objectives. First, usage refers to how audience members expect to use your presentational content which will help the group transform ideas into audience-centered speech points. Second, knowledge level means the audience’s knowledge level about the topic within the audience which assists the group in developing supporting material for the entire audience. Third, the objectives are linked to how the content serves the audience’s needs and assists the group in being intentional about helping the audience see the reason for their involvement and receive value for the time they devoted to attend. Overall, the content is coordinated in a way that keeps at the forefront who the decision-makers are and what specifics they need to know, would be nice to know, and do not need to know.

Next professionally packaging a presentation for the audience deals with the structure or how you arrange points. The structure takes into consideration a strong opening, logical order, relevant key points, conciseness, and use of supplementary visual aids. In addition, the linking of points involves conversational language and the appropriate use of acronyms and technical jargon for inclusion or exclusion. The focus is geared to the perception of trustworthiness. Three strategic questions to answer include:

  • What qualities as a group will demonstrate your trustworthiness to this audience?
  • What content order needs to be achieved to give a consistent perception of fairness?
  • What content requires repeating and how should that be achieved—through comparisons, examples, illustrations, etc.?

The packaging of successful group presentations revolves around the type of relationship with the audience, the division of time, and enthusiasm. An important dynamic of group presentations is for your group to know if audience members will be required to give an internal presentation or briefing from your presentation. As a group, know if you are packaging a one-time presentation, bidding for a long-term relationship, continuing a relationship for offering expertise, or if the presentation is tied to internal pressures to performance appraisals. Such knowledge will aid your group in developing talking points which can be re-presented with accuracy.

The type of presentation will help you divide the time for your presentation. The majority of the time is always spent on the body of the speech. A typical 30-minute speech might be divided into four minutes for the introduction, ten minutes for the body, and four minutes for the conclusion. The remaining 12 minutes is for the audience to ask questions, offer objections, or simply to become part of the discussion. It is important to leave enough time for the audience to contribute to the intellectual content. Therefore, always design group presentations with the intent not to run out of time before the audience can participate. All group presentations should have enthusiasm. Group members should be enthusiastic about the audience, message, and occasion. Planned enthusiasm should play a role in creating the introduction, conclusion, and body of your presentations. The consistent use of enthusiasm can be planned throughout the speech outline.

Human Element

Now it is time to focus on compatibility. As a group, consider what will it take to get this audience to pay attention to your presentation. Answer questions such as:

  • What can your group do to develop an introduction, transitions, and conclusions in a way to connect with this audience?
  • What types of stories are common or relatable to this audience?
  • What are the attitudes, beliefs, and values of this audience?

Delivering Your Presentation as One

By completing the other levels of coordination, the group will have decided on the key message, thoroughly researched the supporting material, developed logical conclusions, and created realistic recommendations. Therefore all that stands between you and success is the actual presentation—the vehicle that carries the facts and the ideas to your audience. Here it is important to recognize that if an assignment required both a written document and an oral presentation then be sure one effectively complements the other. Although you can reference the written document during the oral presentation, the oral presentation should be planned with the thought in mind that not everyone is given the written document. Therefore, the oral presentation may be the only content they receive. Since you will not always know who receives the written document, it is best to coordinate the presentation as if no one has the full written document, which can serve as a reference tool for gaining content requiring further explanation or accessibility to detailed information. At the same time, if the entire audience is provided written material keep in mind different decision-makers may be in the audience. For example, the creative director may be only interested in your creative concepts, whereas a vice president of finance may be only interested in figures.

The presentation preparation primarily focuses on your group’s ability to develop a clear plan and execution of delivery. A delivery plan includes essential elements such as (1) purpose, (2) oral content, (3) dress, (4) room, (5) visuals, (6) delivery, and (7) rehearsal to ensure that the group presentation is both captivating and useful to your audience, as well as worth their time.

Group members should keep at the forefront of their minds the answer to the question “Was the general purpose—to inform or to persuade—achieved?” As a group, practice keeping the purpose of the presentation explicit for the audience. The purpose should never become hidden during the presentation. Each group member’s awareness of the purpose is important in maintaining the right kind of delivery. It is possible to have great content for a presentation and miss the entire purpose of the presentation. For example, say your group had been asked to do a presentation about Facebook and how it could be used in the financial industry. You could take an informative or persuasive approach. However, if the audience—banking professionals—attends a presentation where the content is focused on Facebook rather than having a focus on its use in the financial industry, then the purpose was not achieved.

The delivery plan will help you evaluate if the purpose of the presentation is clearly aimed at the primary audience. In addition, the group can determine when and how clearly they are articulating the explicit purpose of the presentation. The purpose is complemented by a clear preview, the audience members’ awareness of what decisions are at issue, and the audience’s desire to get important information first.

Oral Content

Up to this point the majority of the group’s engagement with the content has been in terms of reading and writing. It is time to orally interact with the selected content to ensure that it has been developed for this audience, properly structured, and clearly articulated. The delivery plan is a time to evaluate word choice, idioms, and antidotes. When working with this content, make sure that it is suited to the purpose, and that the key message is explicit so the audience remembers it well.

The introduction of group members, transitions, and internal summaries are all important elements of the delivery plan. A proper introduction of group members and the content will not happen automatically. Therefore, it is important to practice it to determine if introductions fit better at the beginning of the presentation, if names need to be emphasized through the wearing of name tags, or if names are better used as a part of transition content. The use of name only may not be effective in some speaking situations. Therefore, the group needs to determine what a proper group member introduction includes beyond the name. Plus, be consistent; that is, determine if everyone is using first name only or full name, do they need to know your positions, some background, or can you simply state it in a written format such as a team resume. Speech content is not useful if the audience does not accept your credibility.

As in all presentations, an awareness of your physical appearance is an important element in complementing the content of your speech. Do not hesitate to talk about and practice appropriate dress as a group. It is important to look like a group. Really consider defining a group’s speaking uniform by deciding how formal or informal the dress code is.

As a group, the overall question you want to be able to answer is: Did our dress provide an accurate first impression not distracting from the content? So what kinds of things can be distracting? The most common are colors, busy patterns, and large or clinking jewelry. As a group determine what type of dress is effective in coordinating your group’s credibility. It is important to take into consideration cultural, occupational, and regional norms. In addition, it is important to think about branding choices. Often groups want to brand themselves for the audience. It is not necessary to mimic your audience. For example, a sales presentation to cranberry association members may entice a group to wear red. However, the cranberry association may not be the only sale your group needs to make so you will be forced to ask the question: Will each sales presentation audience determine the color we accent in dress? In short, do not let the speaking occasion brand you. Simply know what is considered professional for this presentation. You have spent a lot of time on preparing the content for this audience so do not detract from it.

It is not always feasible to practice your delivery in the actual room where you will deliver your speech. However, it is extremely important that you actively plan your delivery for the room by recreating the speaking environment. If prior access to the room is not available, then you will need to do your planning by asking a series of questions of the presentation planner. Some common things to find out include the size of the room; if a projector is available and its location within the room; is there a platform and/or a stationary lectern; is there a sound system and how many microphones; where the group will be seated before being introduced; will the presentation be recorded; what is the availability of the room in advance of the presentation; and what is the number of seats and seating arrangement so the group can plan for the zone of interaction.

Three people sit on stools on a stage before an audience with a screen with a visual aid behind them

The term visuals refers to both non-technology visual aids (handouts, posters, charts, etc.) and presentation technology. Visuals should not appear as though several individuals made them but rather as uniform to the group’s presentation. All visuals should blend smoothly into the speech. All group members should be clear on what visuals or documents were pre-requested (so you do not eliminate them as unnecessary during rehearsal). Many times it is better to simply project or display visuals. At other times, visuals may need to be assembled in a presentation packet for all audience members. Bohn & Jabusch (1982) suggest that there are several researched-based reasons why visual aids enhance presentations including (a) enhanced understanding —helps audience comprehend what they hear and see; (b) enhanced memory —serves as a visual reinforcement; (c) enhanced organization—visually displays your organizational strategy; (d) enhanced attention —grabs and maintains audience interest; and (e) enhanced sequencing —shows rather than describes.

The four modes of delivery—memorized, impromptu, manuscript, and extemporaneous—are all valuable in group presentations. However, the most common mode of delivery is extemporaneous. Earlier in the chapter, developing a script was discussed. The step of transforming the script into a delivery outline —an abbreviated version of the preparation outline (DiSanza & Legge, 2011)—is a significant part of planning delivery. The ultimate goal is to figure out how the group can be confident that the entire presentation stays together and does not just exist in pieces. The delivery outline may go as far as to stipulate vocal and gesture instructions. The delivery outline is not created to be read from, therefore, the group also should determine how speaker notes will be used. The delivery outline should be provided to every group member so everyone is familiar with the entire presentation. It is important to set up contingency plans for who will present content if someone is absent on the day of the presentation—the presenter who gets stuck in morning traffic or the professional who had a flight delay.

The key is for all group members to remain conversational in their delivery style. This may be best achieved by utilizing effective delivery strategies such as appropriate gestures, movement, and posture; appropriate facial expressions including eye contact; and appropriate vocal delivery—articulation, dialect, pitch, pronunciation, rate, and volume. Group members should evaluate each other on audibility and fluency.

Rehearsals are for the final polishing of your presentations. It is a time to solidify logistics of how many group members are presenting, where they will stand, and the most appropriate transitions between each speaker. Group members should grow more comfortable with each other through rehearsals. A key aspect of polishing involves identifying gaps in content and gaining feedback on content (oral and visual), style, and delivery. The rehearsals are a good time to refine speaker notes and to practice the time limit. The number of scheduled rehearsals is dependent on your group and the amount of preparation time provided. The most important element for the group is to adapt their rehearsal timetable based on an honest evaluation of the speaking skills represented within the group.

The only part of a group presentation that you may not be able to rehearse is responding to the actual audience members’ questions and objections. However, you can anticipate the types of questions and practice a simple strategy of how you will respond—repeating the question, stating who from the group will respond, and answering succinctly. Four of the most common types of questions are follow-up questions; action-oriented questions focused on what would you do if; hypothetical questions focused on different scenarios; and information-seeking questions. A primary way to practice is to think of at least three questions you would like to answer, prepare the answer, and practice it during rehearsal(s).

The foundation of a group presentation is constructed from all the guidelines you use in an individual presentation coupled with additional strategies for working effectively with others. Group presentations primarily entail group communication, planning, organization, and delivery. Effective groups communicate about interaction roles, decision-making, and conflict resolution. Such communication helps the group reflect on group dynamics, customize communication for this speaking group, and establish a unified commitment and collaborative climate.

Review & Reflection Questions

  • How might a group presentation be different than presenting individually?
  • In preparing for a group presentation, what are some key questions and considerations for your group?
  • How can you ensure your group presentation is effective and appears ‘as one’?
  • Beebe, S.A. & Mottet, T.P. (2010). Business and professional communication: Principles and skills for leadership . Allyn & Bacon.
  • Bohn, E. & Jabusch, D. (1982). The effect of four methods of instruction on the use of visual aids in speeches. Western Journal of Speech Communication, 46 , 253-265.
  • DiSanza, J.R., & Legge, N. J. (2011). Business and professional communication: Plans, processes, and performance (5th ed.). Pearson.
  • Fripp. P. (2011). 9 timely tips for pre-presentation preparation. American Salesman, 56 , 13- 16.
  • Keller, J.M. (1983). Motivational design of instruction. In C.M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional design theories: An overview of their current status (pp. 383-434). Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Kowitz, A.C. & Knutson., T.J. (1980). Decision making in small groups: The search for alternatives . Allyn and Bacon.
  • Sprague, J. & Stuart D. (2005). The speaker’s handbook (7th ed. ) . Thomson Wadsworth.

Authors & Attribution

This content comes from the introduction, “Preparing All Parts of the Assignment” and “Delivering Your Presentation as One” written by Jennifer F. Wood, Ph.D., in Chapter 18 Group Presentations . from the Public Speaking Project . This content is licensed under a CC BY-NC-ND: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License.

harmonious combination or interaction, as of functions or parts

a structured argument in which participants speak for or against a pre-announced proposition

a presentation in which one or more experts may be questioned by a panel of other experts, journalists, and/or the audience

a presentation format that consists of a group of experts publicly discussing a topic among themselves

a presentation format that involves a series of short speeches, usually informative, on various aspects of the same general topic

a clear, agreed outcome for the presentation

a full-sentence outline of virtually everything the speaker intends to say. The outline allows the speakers to test the structure, the logic, and persuasive appeals in the speech

an abbreviated version of the preparation outline

Presenting as a Group Copyright © 2020 by Jasmine R. Linabary, Ph.D. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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How to Deliver Group Presentations: The Unified Team Approach

When you’re asked to present as part of a panel of experts or a team making a sales pitch, you might think that there is safety in numbers and that you need to prepare less than if you were speaking on your own.

The truth is that, for your audience, a group presentation is only as strong as its weakest presenter. Here’s how to help your team create a strong and unified group presentation .

3 Ingredients of Great Group Presentations

The three ingredients to develop and deliver a unified group presentation are clarity, control, and commitment.

Clarity of Purpose

Clarity of roles, clarity of message, control introductions, control transitions, control time and space, commit to a schedule, commit to rehearsing.

  • Commit to Answering Your Audience’s Questions

Incorporating these elements will give your audience a “seamless” message.

Ingredient #1: Clarity

Just as your presentation will have a clear purpose, expressed in a thesis statement, your group should create a Charter Statement that explicitly captures the group’s desired outcome.

The charter is different from a thesis statement. The thesis specifically frames the presentation message whereas the charter frames your group’s purpose. This Charter Statement becomes the test of everything that will go into the presentation and help guide the efforts of the team. The charter and the thesis may overlap, but even your thesis statement must be tested against the group’s Charter.

For example, if your group agrees that your general purpose is to sell your product, and, more specifically, you know that the key decision maker in the audience is leery about cutting checks to companies like yours, build that into your Charter Statement.

The purpose of our presentation is to sell our Product to ABC Company by overcoming the objections of the company’s Purchasing Officer through clear examples of how our Product provides a fast return on investment.

The Charter Statement will come in handy when you have a team member who may want to go “off track” to tell personal anecdotes that don’t pass the test of the group’s charter.

Personalities come into play when groups meet to develop presentations. Jockeying for position and ego struggles can quickly deplete the group’s momentum, resulting in hurt feelings and, potentially, a weaker presentation. Providing clarity to group roles helps to establish expectations and keep the entire group moving towards a common objective: a great group presentation.

“ Developing clarity within your group will help you develop a clear message for your audience. ”

Identify the roles your group needs during message development. For example, to ensure that team members are meeting assignments, select a Project Manager . This person isn’t the “boss of the presentation”, but rather will focus on schedule and assignments.

Other roles could include a Gap Analyst who is responsible for identifying “gaps” in content and support materials (handouts, graphics, etc.), which in turn could work closely with other roles within the group like the Chief Researcher .

Capitalize on the unique personalities within your group to develop roles that work well for all, but be sure to discuss the roles openly so they are clear to everyone.

Instead of writing “speeches” for each individual speaker , try creating one master presentation , a unified narrative, and then decide who speaks to which points, and when.

This is a shift from the traditional segmented method of group presentations where often group members are directed to “give five minutes of talking” and then are left to develop content independently.

In a master presentation, each speaker may weave in and out at various points during the presentation. When done well, this fluid dynamic can hold an audience’s attention better by offering a regular change in speakers’ voices and presence.

By using a master presentation, your group will ensure that each of the presenters will stay “on script” and use cohesive language, smooth transitions, and (when using visuals) consistent graphics.

Ingredient #2: Control

Your audience notices how your group introduces itself, so plan those introductions with your presentation.

Your presentation may be part of a larger event that includes an emcee who will introduce the team. If so, be sure that you provide pertinent information to the emcee that will allow her/him to generate interest in your presentation even before you begin speaking.

If your group is responsible for making its own introductions, however, you will need to decide if you will introduce your group members in the beginning, or when they first speak. Your group also will need to decide if each member introduces her/himself, or if one member will introduce everyone.

There is no one right way to do introductions, but your group must decide how to do them before the day of the presentation.

Decide how you are going to “hand off” from one speaker to the next. In the “master presentation” approach, you may want to consider simply have speakers pick up a narrative right where the previous speaker left off.

“ Your audience notices how your group introduces itself, so plan those introductions with your presentation. ”

If you use the more traditional segmented approach, each speaker may cue the subsequent speakers by identifying them and their subject matter. For example:

“…and speaking of quality control, no one is more qualified the Bob Johnson. Bob is going to tell us about how this team will deliver a quality project for you.”

Another option is to assign a group emcee who will handle transitions between presentation sections. Your group will need to determine which option makes the most sense based on your presentation style and audience expectations.

Multiple speakers translate to occupying more physical space, and the potential to gobble up more time with introductions and transitions.

If you will be presenting in a small room, consider where each speaker needs to be positioned to quickly reach the speaking area, and whether they will sit or stand when not speaking.

Your presentation must fit within your allotted time, so you will need to time your group’s presentation, including equipment set up, introductions, and transitions.

Ingredient #3: Commitment

Once you know the date of your presentation, create a schedule that includes specific milestones, such as “presentation draft due” and “final rehearsal”. Having a specific schedule allows members either to agree to the group’s expectations or to offer dates that better fit their personal schedules.

Additionally, you can assign specific responsibilities to the scheduled milestones; for example, who is responsible for bringing the handouts, projector, and laptop to the presentation?

“ If you find group members who lack the commitment to rehearse, consider finding group members who will commit. ”

Rehearsing is one of the most important steps for presentation success. Have your team members agree from day one that they will make themselves available to practice with the group.

If you find group members who lack the commitment to rehearse, consider finding group members who will commit. Practice makes perfect, and no rehearsal means your group doesn’t know what will happen to the content, timing, or quality of the presentation. Do those sound like things your group would like to leave to chance?

Commit to Answering Your Audience’s Questions

Once your formal presentation is over, you may see some raised hands in the audience, ready to pepper your group with questions. Your presentation is not over yet. How you handle those questions is as important as the presentation itself. A well-done presentation means nothing if presenters fumble questions so badly that they appear incompetent.

Have each member develop a list of potential questions and then, as a group, review the list. Discuss who will be responsible for handling which types of questions. Are there any questions important enough to build into the presentation?

From a Rag-Tag Group of Speakers to a Dynamic Presenting Team

By incorporating these three ingredients into your next group presentation process, you will find that you not only develop a presentation that your audience loves, but your group will transform from a rag-tag group of speakers into a dynamic presenting team.

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Great article — what I have found over the years with group presentations (2 or more people) is that the transitions are critical for success. Done well, with good chemistry, and a group presentation is fun to watch. Done badly, with awkward moments, and a group presentation becomes a group debacle.

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  • July 25, 2022

Effective group presentation methods

I think we all believe in the miracle of teamwork, but has it ever happened to you that you decide to do teamwork, but you don’t know what to do or what steps to go through? Although effective group presentations usually end with success, we all saw groups that ended up failing, maybe because they didn’t know what presentation skills they needed.

But it can have other reasons as well, read this blog until the end to understand where your strengths and weaknesses are and what can be done to have better teamwork and effective Presentation design services .

presentation methods are most effective for

Table of Contents

What is a group presentation?

When we are having a presentation with a group of people that’s a group presentation. And this group can be made up of friends, classmates, colleagues, or anyone else who is working together on a project. In my view, if you want to involve everyone in the project and to ensure that everyone is on the same page group presentation is the best way.

There are a few things you should keep in mind when it comes to group presentations.

I want to mention a few things plea keep them in your mind about group presentation.

  • First, you should make sure that everyone on the team is prepared.
  • Second, you should make sure that the presentation is focused and on track.
  • Finally, you should make sure that everyone on the team is comfortable with the presentation.

So, here, some have we were learning what is the definition of group presentation after that I’m going to tell you what is important to have it.

Why is it important to have a group presentation?

I’m calling them as reasons, there are the reasons why we need them and why it’s important that much.

  • First: it’s your chance to get everyone on the team involved with the presentation so you can look at it as a chance.
  • Second: it’s an opportunity to ensure that everyone on the team is on the same page.
  • Finally: if you need other people to focus on the project it’s a great chance.

group presentation skills

Effective Group Presentations

Group presentations are a common way for individuals to collaborate and convey information, ideas, or projects to an audience. To ensure about effective group presentations, several key aspects need to be considered:

1-Planning and Organization:

Effective group presentations start with thorough planning. Define the presentation’s purpose, objectives, and target audience. Establish a clear structure, including an introduction, main points, and a conclusion. Divide tasks among group members, assigning roles and responsibilities.

2-Content Development:

Collaboratively develop content that is relevant, clear, and engaging. Ensure that each point is well-researched and supported with evidence. Create a logical flow between topics to maintain the audience’s interest and comprehension.

3-Visual Aids:

Visual aids, such as slides, charts, and graphs, can enhance understanding and retention. Design them to be visually appealing and uncluttered. Visuals should complement the spoken content, not replace it.

4-Practice:

Rehearse the presentation as a group multiple times. This helps improve the flow, timing, and coordination among presenters. The practice also reduces nervousness and builds confidence.

5-Engagement Techniques:

Engage the audience through various means, such as asking questions, providing real-world examples, or using anecdotes. Encourage participation to maintain interest and interaction.

6-Body Language and Delivery:

Effective communication extends beyond words. Pay attention to non-verbal cues like eye contact, gestures, and posture. Maintain a confident and friendly demeanor. Speak clearly and at an appropriate pace, considering the audience’s ability to follow.

7-Time Management:

Keep track of time to ensure the presentation runs smoothly and smoothly. Allocate time for questions and discussion at the end if necessary.

8-Handling Questions:

Anticipate potential questions and prepare answers. When responding to questions from the audience, be concise and, if necessary, defer questions that require more in-depth discussion to a later time.

9-Adaptability:

Be ready to adapt to unexpected situations, technical glitches, or audience response changes. Flexibility and the ability to improvise can make a significant difference.

What is teamwork?

You should not forget about teamwork cause a good team presentation is made of good teamwork. Teamwork is when a group of people comes together to achieve a common goal. There are many benefits to teamwork, including the ability to accomplish more than what one person could do alone, the ability to share knowledge and skills, and the ability to provide support for one another.

So we talked about group presentation and why we are doing it then we had to work on how we could have a better group presentation. One of the greatest factors that are involved in it is teamwork, cause a good team presentation is made of good teamwork. Teamwork is when a group of people comes together to achieve a common goal(i don’t know if have i ever mentioned it on my blogs or not but people with the same goals with a good strategy can change the world) Let back to our topic here are many benefits to teamwork, including the ability to accomplish more than what one person could do alone, the ability to share knowledge and skills, and the ability to provide support for one another.

Why is important to have teamwork?

We worked on the meaning of teamwork is time to say why it is important to have that. There are many reasons why teamwork is important i’m giving you three important reasons to believe that soo is so important.

One of the most important is that it allows for a greater level of productivity. When a team works together, each member can focus on their strengths and contribute to the overall goal. This can help a team to achieve more than what one person working alone could ever hope to achieve.

Another reason teamwork is important is that it allows for the sharing of knowledge and skills. When team members work together, they can share their expertise and learn from one another. This can help to improve the skills of the team as a whole and make them more effective at giving presentations.

Finally, teamwork is important because it provides support for one another. When team members work together, they can offer encouragement and motivation to one another. This can be a great way to keep team members focused and on track during a presentation.

presentation methods are most effective

Choose a team captain

When it comes to giving presentations, one of the most important things you can do is choose a team captain. The team captain is responsible for coordinating the team’s efforts and making sure that everyone is on the same page. They will also be responsible for giving the final presentation, so it is important to choose someone confident and capable of delivering a great presentation.

So, like always we are talking about the most important factors that you should keep in mind and do to improve your chance of success.

The team captain is responsible for coordinating the team’s efforts and making sure that everyone is on the same page and will also be responsible for giving the final presentation, so it is important to choose someone confident and capable of delivering a great presentation, so it’s important to choose a good team captain.

There are a few things you should keep in mind when choosing a team captain.

I’m mentioning a few things to keep in mind when you are choosing a team captain.

  • First, they should be organized and able to keep the team on track.
  • Second, they should be confident and able to deliver a great presentation.
  • Finally, they should be comfortable working with a team.

presentation methods are effective

Know your roles within the team

So why do we use a captain to make everything clear so everyone knows their roles?

In a group presentation, all of the group members need to know their roles so they can do them faster and be prepared for them. There are a few different roles that you can play on a team, and each one has its own set of responsibilities.

  • The first role is that of the presenter . The presenter is responsible for delivering the presentation to the audience.
  • The second role is that of the support staff . The support staff is responsible for helping the presenter with the presentation.
  • The third role is that of the audience . The audience is responsible for listening to the presentation and providing feedback.

group presentation skill

Have a strategy in place for question time

When it comes to giving presentations, one of the most important things you can do is have a strategy in place for question time.

First ill make it clear when is question time. Question time is when the audience gets to ask the team questions about the presentation. You had to look at it as a great opportunity to get feedback from the audience and to clarify any points that they may be confused about.

group presentationneed skills

The team needs a full group rehearsal

If you want to give a great presentation, it is important to have a full group rehearsal. This rehearsal should be done with the entire team, and it should be focused on going over the presentation from start to finish so care about this one cause it’s too important. This rehearsal will help to ensure that everyone on the team is on the same page and that they know what they need to do.

Do a member analysis

So, what to do if we want to have a member analysis you should first make a list of all the members of the group. Then, you should write down the strengths and weaknesses of each member. After you have done the member analysis, you should assign roles for the presentation.

As i told you before it’s one of the ways to go and know your roles.

Make sure everyone is prepared

So, this one is more about the captain i mean the captain should check this but the other members should know too. The captain should make sure that everyone on the team is prepared. 

Individual and group practice are equally important

 it is important to do both individual and group practice. Individual practice will help you to understand your role in the presentation. Group practice will help you to understand how to work with the other members of the group.

Watch other group presentations together

I can mention this one as a hint so that the reason that is at the end of my list so go and watch other group presentations. Cause this will help you to meet the exact mistakes that you may have in your presentation, the other reason that I’m recommending it to you is that it will also help you to understand the different elements of a group presentation.

So as your last job go and see the other group presentation and try to cover their week ness in your own presentation.

Effective Presentation Methods

Choosing effective presentation methods depends on the content, audience, and goals. Presentation methods are most effective for includes:

Lecture-Style Presentations:

Suitable for conveying complex information or educational content. The presenter speaks while using visual aids to support key points.

Interactive Workshops:

Ideal for fostering participation and skill-building. Participants actively engage with the material through exercises, discussions, and group activities.

Panel Discussions:

Effective for presenting multiple perspectives on a topic. Experts or panelists share their insights and engage in a moderated discussion.

Demonstrations and Product Showcases:

Great for showcasing products, software, or tangible items. Demonstrations allow the audience to see how something works in practice.

Storytelling Presentations:

Powerful for connecting with the audience emotionally and making information memorable. Stories engage the audience on a personal level.

Question and Answer (Q&A) Sessions:

These can follow other presentation methods, allowing the audience to seek clarification and dialogue with presenters.

Visual Presentations (e.g., Infographics):

Visual methods effectively convey complex data or statistics in a more digestible format.

Group Presentation Skills

Group presentations require a set of skills beyond individual public speaking abilities. You need to learn crucial group presentation skills, including:

  • Effective communication within the group is vital. Team members should be on the same page regarding content, roles, and timing.
  • Group members should actively listen to each other during rehearsals and the actual presentation. This ensures smooth transitions between speakers and helps address potential issues.
  • Conflicts or disagreements may arise within the group. Skills in negotiation and conflict resolution are essential for maintaining group cohesion.
  • Each member should have a defined role based on their strengths. Roles include the main presenter, content expert, timekeeper, and question-handler.
  • Group presentations may require quick adjustments. Be flexible and ready to adapt if the situation changes.
  • Encourage open and constructive feedback within the group. Use feedback to refine the presentation and enhance group dynamics.
  • Provide support and encouragement to fellow group members. Confidence and motivation are contagious and can boost the overall quality of the presentation.
  • Maintain professionalism during both the preparation and delivery of the presentation. This includes punctuality, deadline adherence, and a respectful attitude toward all team members.

Effective group presentations rely on careful planning, content development, engagement techniques, and delivery skills. The choice of presentation method should align with the content and goals, while group presentation skills, including communication, coordination, and conflict resolution, are essential for successful collaboration. Mastering these aspects will enable groups to deliver impactful and engaging presentations.

How do you structure a group presentation?

A common way to do this is the introduction-body-conclusion format, which consists of three main parts. The introduction should capture the audience’s attention, introduce the topic and main idea, and preview your presentation’s structure and key points.

What are the four common types of group presentations?

Informative, instructional, arousing, and persuasive. Informative presentations briefly educate your audience on a specific topic. Instructional presentations teach your audience more thoroughly and generally include details and directions.

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How to Introduce Group Members in a Presentation Script

How to Introduce Group Members in a Presentation Script

In a presentation script, introduce group members by briefly stating their names and roles. In this introduction, we will discuss the best ways to introduce group members in a presentation script, ensuring clarity and engagement with the audience.

A well-crafted introduction can set the tone for a successful presentation. When introducing group members, it is essential to provide concise information about their names and roles, allowing the audience to understand the expertise each member brings to the table.

By effectively introducing group members, you create a connection between the audience and the presenters, fostering trust and interest in the presentation content. We will explore various strategies and tips for introducing group members in a presentation script while adhering to SEO-friendly writing principles. Let’s dive in and discover how to make impactful introductions for group members in your next presentation script.

Table of Contents

The Importance Of Introducing Group Members In A Presentation Script

Introducing group members in a presentation script holds great importance. It helps establish credibility and build trust. By introducing the team, you create a personal connection with the audience. This allows them to understand the expertise and diversity within the group.

Moreover, it gives each team member a chance to showcase their strengths and contributions. By highlighting individual roles, the audience gains a comprehensive understanding of the presentation’s content. Furthermore, introducing group members fosters a collaborative and professional environment. It shows that the team is well-prepared and unified in their goals.

Overall, introducing group members in a presentation is essential for effective communication and successful outcomes.

Elements Of A Successful Group Member Introduction

Elements of a Successful Group Member Introduction include creating a powerful opening statement, providing background information, and highlighting key skills. Starting with a captivating statement grabs the audience’s attention. Sharing relevant background information about each team member builds credibility. Highlighting key skills and expertise establishes their qualifications.

A concise and engaging introduction sets the tone for the presentation, making it more memorable and impactful. By following these guidelines, you can ensure that your group member introductions are effective and leave a lasting impression on your audience. So, be strategic in your approach and craft introductions that truly showcase the talent and capabilities of your team members.

Crafting An Engaging Presentation Script

Crafting an engaging presentation script involves setting the tone and capturing the audience’s attention from the start. To achieve this, structuring the script for smooth transitions is essential. Rather than simply listing the group members, incorporate storytelling techniques to make the introductions memorable.

By crafting a narrative around each member, you create a connection with the audience, allowing them to relate and engage with the individuals. Use anecdotes, interesting facts, or unique qualities to highlight each person’s contribution. This not only adds a personal touch but also keeps the audience engaged throughout the presentation.

Remember, an effective presentation script is not just about delivering information but also creating a compelling and memorable experience for the listeners. So, take the opportunity to make your introductions stand out and leave a lasting impression on your audience.

Begin With A Captivating Hook

Begin your presentation script with a captivating hook to engage your audience. Capture their attention with a powerful quote or statistic, highlighting the importance of group members in presentations. Share an intriguing anecdote that relates to the topic, sparking curiosity and stimulating their interest.

To provoke thoughtful reflection, ask a question that encourages the audience to consider the significance of working as a team in a presentation setting. By starting strong, you create a compelling opening that sets the tone for an impactful and engaging presentation.

Introducing Each Group Member

Introducing each group member is essential for establishing credibility and expertise. By sharing relevant accomplishments and experiences, you highlight their value to the team. Highlighting their areas of expertise can boost their credibility and gain the audience’s trust. Use concise sentences to mention their key achievements and qualifications.

It is crucial to showcase how each member’s unique skills contribute to the team’s success. By doing so, you ensure that the presentation is informative and engaging. Introducing each group member allows the audience to connect with them on a personal level, making the presentation more relatable and memorable.

Ultimately, effective introductions help establish a strong foundation for a successful presentation.

How to Introduce Group Members in a Presentation Script

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Connecting Group Members To The Presentation Topic

Introducing group members in a presentation script involves connecting them to the topic at hand. By demonstrating how each team member’s expertise aligns with the subject matter, the audience gains insight into their contributions. Additionally, showcasing the unique perspectives of each member enhances the overall presentation, enriching it with diverse viewpoints.

Moreover, emphasizing the collective knowledge and capabilities of the team highlights their collaborative efforts. This approach creates a cohesive and well-rounded presentation, capturing the audience’s attention. It is important to avoid generic and overused phrases while introducing group members in order to maintain the reader’s interest.

By following these guidelines, you can effectively introduce group members in your presentation script while keeping your audience engaged and informed.

Tips For A Fluent And Natural Delivery

Introducing group members in a presentation script can greatly enhance the effectiveness of your delivery. To ensure a fluent and natural delivery, it is important to practice the script beforehand. By using conversational language and tone, you can engage the audience and make them feel more connected to your presentation.

Eye contact and body language also play a crucial role in keeping the audience engaged and interested. Make sure to maintain eye contact with individuals throughout your presentation and use gestures and movements to emphasize key points. This will create a positive and interactive atmosphere, increasing the impact of your presentation.

So remember, practice your script, use conversational language, and engage your audience through eye contact and body language for a successful presentation.

Avoiding Common Mistakes In Group Member Introductions

Group member introductions in a presentation script should be concise and balanced, ensuring that no member is neglected. When introducing each member, avoid using jargon or technical terms that may confuse the audience. It is important not to overwhelm the listeners with excessive information.

Keep it simple and straightforward, providing only relevant details about each member’s role and expertise. By doing so, you can engage the audience and maintain their interest throughout the presentation. Clear and concise introductions create a positive impression and help establish credibility among the group members.

So, remember to be mindful of these common mistakes and deliver effective introductions that leave a lasting impact on your audience.

Frequently Asked Questions On How To Introduce Group Members In A Presentation Script

How do you start a group presentation introduction script.

To start a group presentation introduction, follow these simple steps. Begin with a catchy opening line to grab the audience’s attention. Introduce yourself and your group members briefly, sharing relevant qualifications or expertise. Next, outline the purpose of your presentation and how it will benefit the audience.

Transition into providing an overview of the main topics you will cover, using succinct and engaging language. Lastly, conclude the introduction by highlighting the key takeaways or outcomes your audience can expect. Remember to speak confidently and maintain eye contact with the audience to enhance your delivery.

By following these steps, you can set a strong foundation for a successful group presentation.

How To Introduce Myself And My Group Members In A Presentation Script?

In a presentation script, introducing yourself and your group members can be done in a concise and engaging manner. Begin by stating your name and role within the group. Then, briefly mention the expertise or qualifications that make you suitable for the presentation.

Transition smoothly to introducing each group member by mentioning their names and roles, along with a key attribute or achievement. This will highlight their credibility and relevance to the topic. Remember to focus on the value they bring to the presentation.

By keeping your introductions short and informative, the audience will quickly grasp who you are and why you are qualified to speak on the topic. This establishes credibility and sets the stage for an impactful presentation.

How Do You Introduce Team Members In A Script?

To introduce team members in a script, use concise sentences to keep the information clear and engaging. Start by stating each team member’s name and their role or position within the team. For example, “John Smith is our creative director,” or “Sarah Jones is our marketing specialist.

” Highlight each team member’s expertise and relevant experience, showcasing their unique contributions to the team’s success. Use positive and descriptive language to make their introductions more captivating. Consider adding a personal touch by mentioning their hobbies or interests related to their work.

This will help create a connection between the team members and the audience. Remember to keep the introductions brief to maintain the script’s flow and overall impact.

How Do You Introduce A Team Member In Powerpoint?

To introduce a team member in PowerPoint, follow these simple steps. First, open PowerPoint and navigate to the slide where you want to introduce the team member. Then, click on the “Insert” tab in the top menu and select “Text Box” from the options.

In the text box, type the name and position of the team member. Next, click on the “Design” tab and choose a suitable layout or design for the slide. You can also add a photo of the team member by clicking on the “Insert” tab again and selecting “Picture”.

Once you have entered the necessary information and customized the slide, you can present it by clicking on the “Slide Show” tab and selecting “From Beginning”. This will allow you to introduce your team member to your audience effectively and visually.

Introducing group members in a presentation script is a crucial aspect of delivering a successful presentation. By following a structured approach, you can effectively introduce your team members, create a positive impression, and engage your audience. Start by explaining the purpose and relevance of introducing the group members to establish their credibility.

Be sure to provide essential details like names, roles, and expertise, highlighting their qualifications and achievements. Utilize storytelling techniques and incorporate personal anecdotes to make the introductions more relatable and captivating. Remember to maintain a consistent flow and pace throughout the script, ensuring that each team member’s introduction seamlessly transitions into the next.

By following these guidelines, you can effectively introduce group members in your presentation script, creating a dynamic and engaging experience for your audience.

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Victor Mukhin, Speaker at Chemical Engineering Conferences

Victor M. Mukhin was born in 1946 in the town of Orsk, Russia. In 1970 he graduated the Technological Institute in Leningrad. Victor M. Mukhin was directed to work to the scientific-industrial organization "Neorganika" (Elektrostal, Moscow region) where he is working during 47 years, at present as the head of the laboratory of carbon sorbents.     Victor M. Mukhin defended a Ph. D. thesis and a doctoral thesis at the Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia (in 1979 and 1997 accordingly). Professor of Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia. Scientific interests: production, investigation and application of active carbons, technological and ecological carbon-adsorptive processes, environmental protection, production of ecologically clean food.   

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Common Core Algebra I Math (Worksheets, Homework, Lesson Plans)

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Math Expressions Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Answer Key Make Sense of Two-Step Word Problems

Solve the questions in Math Expressions Grade 3 Homework and Remembering Answer Key Unit 2 Lesson 11 Answer Key Make Sense of Two-Step Word Problems to attempt the exam with higher confidence. https://mathexpressionsanswerkey.com/math-expressions-grade-3-unit-2-lesson-11-answer-key/

Math Expressions Common Core Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Answer Key Make Sense of Two-Step Word Problems

Math Expressions Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Homework

Math Expressions With Answers And Solutions Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11

Write an equation and solve the problem.

Math Expressions With Answers And Solutions Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Question 1. Shamariah collects silk roses. She had 17 silk roses ¡n a vase. Six friends each gave her 3 more roses. How many roses does Shamariah have now? Answer: Number of roses Shamariah have now = 35.

Explanation: Number of silk roses in a vase she had = 17. Number of roses each friend gave her = 3. Number of friends gave her roses = 6. Number of roses Shamariah have now = Number of silk roses in a vase she had + (Number of roses each friend gave her × Number of friends gave her roses) = 17 + (3 × 6) = 17 + 18 = 35.

Make Sense of Two-Step Word Problems Answer Key Grade 3 Unit 2  Question 2. Takala put 9 marbles in the box, Jackie put in 7, and Laird put in 11. Then they divided the marbles evenly among themselves. How many did each person get? Answer: Number of marbles each person got = 9.

Explanation: Number of marbles in the box Takala put = 9. Number of marbles in the box Jackie put = 7. Number of marbles in the box Laird put = 11. Number of marbles each person got = ( Number of marbles in the box Takala put + Number of marbles in the box Jackie put + Number of marbles in the box Laird put ) ÷ 3 = ( 9 + 7 + 11 ) ÷ 3 = ( 16 + 11 ) ÷ 3 = 27 ÷ 3 = 9.

Algebraic Expression Word Problems Examples With Answers Question 3. A pet store had 9 corn snakes. The snakes laid 8 eggs each. All but 5 of the eggs hatched. How many baby corn snakes does the pet store have? Answer: Number of baby corn snakes the pet store has = 5.

Explanation: Number of corn snakes a pet store had = 9. Number of eggs each snake laid = 8. Number of eggs got hatched = 5. Number of baby corn snakes the pet store has = Number of eggs got hatched = 5

Make Sense of Two-Step Word Problemss Grade 3 Unit 2 Answer Key Question 4. In a paper airplane contest, Amanda’s plane flew 19 ft farther than Darren’s plane. Darren’s plane flew twice as far as Rachel’s plane. Rachel’s plane flew 20 ft. How far did Amanda’s plane fly? Answer: Distance of Amanda’s plane flew = 59 ft.

Explanation: Distance of Rachel’s plane flew = 20 ft. Darren’s plane flew twice as far as Rachel’s plane. => Distance of Darren’s plane flew = 2 × Distance of Rachel’s plane flew = 2 × 20 ft = 40 ft. Amanda’s plane flew 19 ft farther than Darren’s plane. => Distance of Amanda’s plane flew = Distance of Darren’s plane flew + 19 = 40 ft + 19 ft = 59 ft.

Math Expressions Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Answer Key Question 5. Jenna divided 120 daisies into 2 equal groups. Then she divided each group equally into 10 small bunches. She gave her grandmother one small bunch. How many daisies did Jenna give her grandmother? Answer: Number of daisies Jenna give her grandmother = 6.

Explanation: Number of daisies Jenna had = 120. Number of equal groups she divided = 2. Number of daisies in each group = Number of daisies Jenna had ÷ Number of equal groups she divided = 120 ÷ 2 = 60. Number of daisies small bunches she divided = 10. Number of daisies each bunch has = Number of daisies in each group ÷ Number of daisies small bunches she divided = 60 ÷ 10 = 6. She gave her grandmother one small bunch. => Number of daisies Jenna give her grandmother = 1 × Number of daisies each bunch has = 1 × 6 = 6.

Math Expressions Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Remembering

Question 1. Lily has 24 classmates. She gives each classmate 1 pencil. How many pencils in all does she give her classmates? Answer: Number of pencils she gives to all her classmates = 24.

Explanation: Number of classmates Lily has = 24. Number of pencils each friend she gives = 1. Number of pencils she gives to all her classmates = Number of classmates Lily has × Number of pencils each friend she gives = 24 × 1 = 24.

Question 2. There are 50 students on a field trip. The tours let 10 students enter at a time. How many tours will be needed for each student to go on a tour? Answer: Number of tours will be needed for each student to go on a tour = 5.

Explanation: Number of students on a field trip = 50. Number of students enter at a time = 10. Number of tours will be needed for each student to go on a tour = Number of students on a field trip ÷ Number of students enter at a time = 50 ÷ 10 = 5.

Write a question to finish the word problem. Then solve the problem.

Question 3. The art teacher has 9 boxes of crayons. There are 8 crayons in each box. Question: _____________ Solution: ________________ Answer: Question: The art teacher has 9 boxes of crayons. There are 8 crayons in each box. How many crayons are in altogether. Solution: Number of crayons in altogether she has = 72.

Explanation: The art teacher has 9 boxes of crayons. There are 8 crayons in each box. How many crayons are in altogether. Number of boxes of crayons the art teacher has = 9. Number of crayons in each box = 8. Number of crayons in altogether she has = Number of boxes of crayons the art teacher has × Number of crayons in each box = 9 × 8 = 72.

Write the first step question and answer. Then solve the problem.

Question 4. Mr. Garcia buys 8 packages of juice. There are 6 juice boxes in each package. On the field trip, 40 students drink a juice box. How many juice boxes are left? Answer: Number of juice boxes left = 47.

Explanation: Number of packages of juice Mr. Garcia buys = 8. Number of juice boxes in each package = 6. Number of juice boxes the students drank = 1. Number of students drank the juice box = 40. Number of juice boxes left = ( Number of packages of juice Mr. Garcia buys × Number of juice boxes in each package) – Number of juice boxes the students drank = ( 8 × 6 ) – 1 = 48 – 1 = 47.

Question 5. Stretch Your Thinking Write a two step word problem that uses multiplication and subtraction. Then solve the two step problem. Answer: Question: Sissy buys 9 boxes of soaps. There are 6 soaps in each box. After opening the boxes, she found 2 soaps broken in all. How many soaps are left? Solution: Number of soaps left with her = 52.

Explanation: Question: Sissy buys 9 boxes of soaps. There are 6 soaps in each box. After opening the boxes, she found 2 soaps broken in all. How many soaps are left?

Solution: Number of boxes of soaps Sissy buys = 9. Number of soaps in each box = 6. Number of soaps got broken = 2. Number of soaps left with her = ( Number of boxes of soaps Sissy buys × Number of soaps in each box ) – Number of soaps got broken = ( 9 × 6 ) – 2 = 54 – 2 = 52.

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common core algebra 2 unit 11 lesson 3 homework answers

Standards Alignment - Powered by EdGate. Table of Contents and Standards Alignment for Common Core Algebra II. Unit 1 - Algebraic Essentials Review. Unit 2 - Functions as the Cornerstones of Algebra II. Unit 3 - Linear Functions, Equations, and Their Algebra. Unit 4 - Exponential and Logarithmic Functions. Unit 5 - Sequences and Series.

Exercise 8. Exercise 9. Exercise 10. Exercise 11. Exercise 12. Exercise 13. Exercise 14. Exercise 15. Find step-by-step solutions and answers to Algebra 2 Common Core - 9780133186024, as well as thousands of textbooks so you can move forward with confidence.

Algebra 2 answers, solutions, and theory for high school math, 10th to 11th grade. Like a math tutor, better than a math calculator or problem solver. Mathleaks. ... Pearson Algebra 2 Common Core, 2011. ISBN: 9780133186024. undefined Textbooks Browse chapters. Pearson Algebra 2 Common Core, 2013. ISBN: 9780133281163.

Exercise 54. Exercise 55. Exercise 56. Exercise 57. Exercise 58a. Exercise 58b. Find step-by-step solutions and answers to Algebra 2 Common Core - 9780547647074, as well as thousands of textbooks so you can move forward with confidence.

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Algebra 2 Common Core Packets and Solutions. Packets contain notes, practice, and application problems for each lesson. Solutions contain worked out answers for all the practice and application problems. The teacher notes are NOT included with the solutions, but you can find them by watching the videos on our ALGEBRA 2 site.

Module 2 Overview. Topic A Overview. Lesson 1: Ferris Wheels—Tracking the Height of a Passenger Car ( Video Lesson) Lesson 2: The Height and Co-Height Functions of a Ferris Wheel ( Video Lesson) Lesson 3: The Motion of the Moon, Sun, and Stars—Motivating Mathematics ( Video Lesson) Lesson 4: From Circle-ometry to Trigonometry ( Video Lesson ...

The following lessons are based on the New York State (NYS) Common Core Math Standards. They consist of lesson plans, worksheets (from the NYSED) and videos to help you prepare to teach Common Core Math in the classroom or at home. There are lots of help for classwork and homework. Each grade is divided into six or seven modules.

Watch Common Core Algebra II.Unit 2.Lesson 3.Function Composition, Math Videos on TeacherTube. X. Find Lessons! Join Free! ... Common Core Algebra II.Unit 2.Lesson 3.Function Composition Math. emathinstruction. Sep 22, 2016. 6431 views. ... -5, 9 -5 equals four, then four gets fed into G of four, two times four plus three. Gives me an 8 plus ...

Home / For Teachers / Common Core Algebra II / Unit 11 - The Circular Functions. Unit 11 - The Circular Functions. Lesson 1 Rotations and Angle Terminology. LESSON/HOMEWORK. LESSON VIDEO. ANSWER KEY. EDITABLE LESSON. EDITABLE KEY. Lesson 2 Radian Angle Measurement ... Unit 11 Mid-Unit Quiz (through Lesson 5) - Form D ASSESSMENT. ANSWER KEY.

Study with Quizlet and memorize flashcards containing terms like Use the formula (x-x1)²+(y-y1)²=r² to determine the center and radius of the circle from the equation. (x-9)² + (y-8)² = 4², Use the formula (x-x1)^2+(y-y1)^2=r^2 to determine the center and radius of the circle from the equation. x² + 2x + y² + 8y + 8 = 0, Given the center and radius, write the standard equation for the ...

CPM homework help. Answers and solutions to CPM Educational textbooks. World class homework help, a private tutor in your pocket. Download for free and get better grades. ... Core Connections Algebra 2, 2013. ISBN: 9781603281157. undefined Textbooks Show chapters. Core Connections Integrated I, 2014. ISBN: 9781603283236.

Lesson 16: Graphing Quadratic Equations From the Vertex Form, y=a (x-h) 2 +k ( Vide0) Lesson 17: Graphing Quadratic Functions From the Standard Form, f (x)=ax 2 +bx+c ( Video Lesson) Function Transformations and Modeling. Topic C Overview. Lesson 18: Graphing Cubic, Square Root, and Cube Root Functions.

3. In which of the following graphs is each input not paired with a unique output? (2 (1) 4. In which of the following formulas is the variable y a one-to-one function of the variable x? (Hint - try generating some values either in your head or using TABLES on your calculator.) (1) yx2 (3) yx2 (2) yx (4) y 5 (4) y x (1) y x (2) y (3) y x (1 ...

Teaching Math Just Got a Whole Lot Easier. FREE Lessons, Homework Sets, and Videos . eMATHinstruction makes teaching math a whole lot easier and learning math a whole lot more fun. We provide FREE lessons, videos and homework sets for middle and high school mathematics courses. Our standards-aligned, scaffolded curricula are easy to use, and save teachers time and energy.

1) Choose the best answer. A (n) _____ is a line that a graph approaches as the value of a variable gets extremely large or extremely small. 2) Choose the best answer. The vertical asymptotes are found from the ____ of the denominator of a rational equation. 3) Choose the best answer.

EDITABLE KEY. Assessment. Unit 6 - Mid-Unit Quiz (Through Lesson #6) - Form D. ASSESSMENT. ANSWER KEY. EDITABLE ASSESSMENT. EDITABLE KEY. Add-on. U06.AO.01 - Lesson 5.4 - Factoring Trinomials Using the AC Method.

In this lesson we see how to use the method of guess and check in order to factor trinomial polynomials.

Quadratic functions and their algebra are explored through a variety of topics. Students use graphing calculator technology to explore the turning points, intercepts, and geometric transformations of parabolas. Fundamental algebra, such as multiplication of polynomials and factoring using primary methods is intelligently drilled.

Common Core Algebra 2 HOMEWORK, Inverses of Linear Functions. Unit 3, Lesson 5

Solve the questions in Math Expressions Grade 3 Homework and Remembering Answer Key Unit 2 Lesson 11 Answer Key Make Sense of Two-Step Word Problems to attempt the exam with higher confidence ... Math Expressions Common Core Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Answer Key Make Sense of Two-Step Word Problems. Math Expressions Grade 3 Unit 2 Lesson 11 Homework.

Piecewise Linear Functions. LESSON/HOMEWORK. LESSON VIDEO. ANSWER KEY. EDITABLE LESSON. EDITABLE KEY. Lesson 7. Systems of Linear Equations (Primarily 3 by 3) LESSON/HOMEWORK.

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INVITATION TO PRESENTATION OF EMBRACER GROUP'S DIVESTMENT OF GEARBOX ENTERTAINMENT

Embracer Group hereby invites you to a presentation on today’s press releases and announcement of the divestment of Gearbox Entertainment.

The presentation will be held in English by CEO Lars Wingefors and Deputy CEO and CFO Johan Ekström. A Q&A session will follow the presentation.

Date:  March 28, 2024

Time:  CET 09:00

Online:  Welcome to participate online by webcast, join here

Questions are welcome by teleconference. If you wish to participate via teleconference please register on the link below. After registration you will be provided phone numbers and a conference ID to access the conference. Link to teleconference here.

For more information, please contact:

Oscar Erixon, Head of Investor Relations Embracer Group AB (publ)

Tel: + 46 730 24 91 42

E-post: [email protected]

Arman Teimouri, Head of External Relations Embracer Group AB (publ)

Tel: +46 793 33 05 60

E-post: [email protected]

About Embracer Group

Embracer Group is a global Group of creative and entrepreneurial businesses in PC, console, mobile and board games and other related media. The Group has an extensive catalog of over 900 owned or controlled franchises. With its head office based in Karlstad, Sweden, Embracer Group has a global presence through its twelve operative groups: THQ Nordic, PLAION, Coffee Stain, Amplifier Game Invest, Saber Interactive, DECA Games, Gearbox Entertainment, Easybrain, Asmodee, Dark Horse, Freemode and Crystal Dynamics – Eidos. The Group has 132 internal game development studios and is engaging more than 15,000 employees in more than 40 countries.

Embracer Group’s shares are publicly listed on Nasdaq Stockholm under the ticker EMBRAC B.

Subscribe to press releases and financial information: https://embracer.com/investors/subscription/

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  • Feb 28, 2023

Russia: Magnit launches its second discount concept B1

Updated: May 5, 2023

Russian largest retail chain Magnit (owned by Marathon Group and list on MCX : MGNT, LSE : MGNT) launches its second discount format B1. The first three pilot stores were opened in Stupino, Elektrostal and Tuchkovo in Moscow region.

For this new discount project, Magnit appointed Anzhela Ryabova who has a wide spread retail experience where off discount retail at the Siberian-based store chain Baton (part of Krasny Yar).

The new format B1 will strengthen the presence of Magnit in the segment of discounters, where Magnit is represented from 2020 by the soft-discount proximity small size concept "My Price", and will allow to cover even more consumer missions. B1 are stores with a focus on a limited quality assortment at attractive prices, covering the basic needs of the consumer.

The new discount format is close to the classic discount concept and is aimed at consumers who do not accept compromises in quality, but strive for rational purchases. The range of B1 with 1,000 SKU is narrower than the soft discounters "My Price" (average of 2,500 SKUs), and own brands (private labels) in the future will occupy about 50% of the B1`s product offer.

B1 will adhere the EDLP (every day low prices) pricing strategy. But the basis of the assortment of the discount format will be products of the middle price segment with a small share of goods of the "first price".

Due to a deeper optimization of operational processes in stores and logistics, prices in B1 will be lower than in "My Price" and in "Magnit" stores. In the B1 assortment emphasis is placed on offering high-quality fresh categories, as well as fruits and vegetables. Another key category of the new format is fresh pastries: in B1 stores there will be bakeries for the production of fresh bread, buns and pies.

Another distinctive feature of B1 will be a wide offer of weight goods such as cereals, confectionery, frozen foods, seafood, etc. At the same time, a significant proportion of goods in B1 will be presented in large packages, which will also help customers optimize their spending.

The store area of B1 stores will be 330 - 400 sqm. Only pallet and boxed goods are presented, which requires additional merchandising space. In addition, the B1 layout provides wide aisles for the convenience of buyers, fast shopping and store productivity.

Another element of B1 will be the use of modern technologies in stores, such as self-service cash registers. It will test the so-called "cold rooms", separate rooms with a special temperature regime for chilled products (meat, fish, salads, dairy products). Cold rooms will allow B1 to reduce operating costs, as well as the time of personnel for laying out goods.

B1 is managed by Angela Ryabova, who joined Magnit in November 2022. Before that Ryabova headed the Krasny Yar group of companies, developing the Baton discounter successfully.

In the future, B1 will set-up a separate logistics, maximally adapted to the needs of the format in terms of speed and cost of operations. It is assumed that the first own B1 distribution center will be opened in the fourth quarter of 2023. In the near future, Magnit will open up to 15 pilot B1 stores in different configurations and types of locations in different cities of the Moscow region to test several hypotheses, operating models and business processes. After that, the company will form the optimal model of the hard discounter and will decide on scaling the format, supported by DRC .

"Discounters remain one of the fastest growing segments of the market and retain high potential for further development. We want to create a standard of "high-quality" hard discounters on the Russian market, a format that is very poorly represented in our country. Our hard discounter is a store for modern consumers who rationally approach their budget and time, but are not ready to sacrifice the quality of life," says Angela Ryabova, Director of B1.

Magnit is presented in all grocery retail formats covering basic consumer missions. The company develops a network of convenience stores for frequent purchases of basic basket goods, large-format stores (supermarkets and superstores) with a wider range for future purchases, drug stores for purchases of non-food products. The new B1 format is focused on purchasing a basic food basket for a few days and daily purchases of fresh goods, while "My Price" covers the wider needs for daily purchases of basic goods on a smaller space.

In 2022, Magnit expanded its network of soft discounters to 700 stores and in 2023 it will continue to expand this format.

Source: retail.ru

#b1 #myprice #magnit #newdiscountformat # smartdiscount #discountfoodretail #discounter #discount #foodretail #retail #drc #discountretailconsulting #retailconsulting #consulting #consultancy

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