How to Round Up GPA on Resume?

round up gpa on resume

“Your resume says a lot about you – it determines whether you will be called IN for an interview or NOT.” Author Unknown.

Adding your Grade Point Average to your resume is optional. It’s a good way to highlight your performance or a way to ruin your chance of landing the job you want. Making this decision is tricky, especially if your GPA is not good. Maybe the employer will leave you no choice and specifically ask you to include it in your CV.

In the process of exploring whether you can round up your GPA on your resume, it might be beneficial to understand what jobs you can get with a Series 7 . This information could guide your career planning and open up new possibilities.

Applying for a job for the first time? Don’t hesitate and add the grades to your resume. With no prior relevant experience, it might help the employers pick you for the job. High grades portray you as hardworking.

You might also be wondering ‘Can I round my GPA on my resume? Is it legal?’ Yes, you can, and it is if you do it properly! Let’s take a look at how and where you can include it.

How to Include GPA on a Resume?

How to Include GPA on a Resume?

There are several ways and sections where the Grade Point Average should be included . First, consider the section in which you’ll include it.

The education or achievements sections are the right places for it. However, it does matter in which section you include it. Putting the grades in the Achievements Section means that you have very high grades. Present it as one of your achievements.

If however, your grades are not so high, include it in the Education Section or simply leave it out.

There are three types to choose from.

  • Major GPA – refers to the average grades on the courses required by your major.
  • Cumulative – refers to the average grade of a certain semester from one institute.
  • Overall – refers to the average of all cumulative grades.

How do you decide which one of the above to choose? Generally, companies want to know your overall grades, which is the one you should use.

The major option should be used if it’s higher than the overall or if the major is relevant to the position you’ve applied for. It will be good to show the employer that your Grade Point Average is high for your major.

Should You Round Your GPA on Resume?

In general, the grades you include in your CV should reflect the one on your transcript. A 3.5 always looks better on a CV than a 3.45. However, do you round GPA up on resume?

Some experts explain that a small rounding doesn’t make much difference. Rounding your GPA to a one decimal point is acceptable.

A problem occurs if you round it from 3.90 to 4.00. The 4.00 GPA should truly be that as it is referred to as the “perfect Grade Point Average.”

If the employer asks for a minimum Grade Point Average requirement, then avoid rounding it. At the same time, some recruiters check transcripts to verify the grades. So if you know they’ll be checking, leave it as it is.

How to Round GPA on Resume

There are several ways that a GPA may be tuned-up. The method you use may be significant whether the recruiter will consider you dishonest or not.

The grades may be rounded to the hundredth or by rounding only one decimal place. Rounding to the nearest hundredth doesn’t make much of a difference. If your actual GPA is 3.44, a possible rounding will be 3.45. The one-decimal round-up means that a Grand Point Average of 3.49 becomes a 3.5.

So next time you think ‘ Should I put 3.3 GPA on resume , or 3.4’, read our articles on how to round it up properly. And if you need help finding the best resume writers , we got you covered as well!

How NOT to Round GPA on Resume

There’s also a rounding GPA on resume to the nearest tenth; however, it is not recommended as it may seem dishonest. This will especially be an issue if the employer asks to see transcripts and compares the grades.

Tuning up the grades to the nearest tenth means rounding a 3.35 Grade Point Average to a 3.4, and the difference is much bigger. Additionally, if you have a 3.5, you cannot round it up to a 4 as that is considered lying rather than simple rounding up.

Be Careful When Rounding Up GPA on Resume

Tuning the Grade Point Average on a resume is a debatable issue. Employers would tell you not to do it. Why put your integrity on the line when they will check the transcript and realize that you have misrepresented yourself.

On the other hand, the best resume writers say that modifying it doesn’t affect your reputation. Many job applicants before you have done it.

Think about the worth of risking your reputation for a GPA before doing anything. Make sure you round it up the right way if you decide to do it. Avoid creating a major difference between the resume and transcript information.

Inclusion of Grade Point Average in a CV has to be done professionally. Think twice if you need to include your grades in your resume but have decided to fool the company.

Companies very often check students’ transcripts, so why be remembered as a liar. You can check our other articles if you want to learn why you should not lie about GPA – if you want to know more.

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When to Include GPA on Your Resume (With Examples)

7 min read · Updated on December 07, 2023

Marsha Hebert

Your GPA probably isn't a deciding factor in winning an interview or getting hired, but you'll sometimes need to include it

You already know how important a well-crafted resume is in your search for a new job. There are many things to consider – what skills you have, your career achievements, and how your background aligns with the requirements of the position you want. Another question that people often ask is, “Should I put my GPA on my resume?” In fact, there are a host of questions that people ask surrounding including GPA on their resume:

Do employers check GPA?

Should I put 2.7 GPA on my resume?

What GPA is too low for a resume?

Can I get a job with a 2.0 GPA?

Does a 3.99 GPA round up?

In the grand scheme of getting a job, your GPA isn't likely to be THE thing that secures an interview or job offer; however, there are some instances when you should include your GPA on your resume. This article is going to dive into some different scenarios and give you some examples, so that you get your GPA on your resume the right way without raising any red flags. 

Ready? Let's do this!

Your GPA is one ingredient

If you've ever baked a cake, you know that you need flour, eggs, butter, and sugar. No one ingredient is more important than the other because everything has to work together to give you a nice sponge that is worthy of that glass of milk you've been eyeballing. 

The same is true for your GPA. Sure, telling an employer that you maintained a 4.0 GPA is great, but they're also interested in how your qualifications can be used within their team and company to boost productivity, efficiency, and profits. Just saying you had a 4.0 doesn't let them know any of that, because you could've been staying at Mom and Dad's house with no other concerns in life than doing schoolwork. 

Basically, your GPA alone doesn't tell the whole story.

You must pair that GPA with experiences and accomplishments , too, even if those accomplishments are academic.

Academic achievements + GPA for recent graduates 

Everyone everywhere started as a new graduate. When you apply for an entry-level position , you may have a limited amount of experience to draw from. 

How do you prove to future employers that you have what it takes to succeed in the role they have open?

Many job seekers who are fresh out of school will turn to their GPA. Of course, including your GPA on your resume can certainly help your application to stand out from the crowd, but you should also showcase achievements you had during your time in college. 

Some examples of academic achievements include:

Being on a fundraising committee for your fraternity

Helping students in the placement office at school

Working on marketing campaigns for recruiting new students

Completing a capstone project

Acting as a Resident Assistant in the dorm

Accepting and completing an internship

From here, your GPA becomes an ingredient in the recipe of your job search. It, along with your  other achievements, can work together to tell a story – “Look, I know how to get things done!"

That seems like a lot to include in the Education section of your resume, but it's really not. In the end, when you're leveraging things you accomplished in school and your GPA, your Education section starts to look more like a Work History listing on your resume.

Here's an example of academic achievements and GPA on your resume:

Bachelor of Arts in Communications | ABC College | 2024

GPA: 3.9/4.0

Relevant coursework : Public Speaking, Intercultural Communication, Public Relations, Mass Media, Communication, and Public Decision Making

Major Capstone Project:  

Communication Campaign for XYZ Nonprofit

Applied comprehensive research to identify the target audience

Analyzed current communication strategies

Crafted new messages and a multi-channel communication plan that improved engagement

Performed A/B testing on audience perception

Affiliations and Activities:

  • Semester Abroad - Immersed in French language and culture, expanding on international communication perspectives
  • Tutor - Supported over 5 communications students in passing the final Mass Media exam
  • President, Marketing Club - Directed marketing strategy discussions, organized workshops, and built relationships with industry partners.

Now, having your GPA on your resume is more impressive because prospective employers can see everything else you were doing in school while still maintaining a high GPA. 

Experienced professionals + GPA on resume

Once you get some professional experience under your belt, your GPA becomes less important because your experience trumps what you did in school. Some jobs will require you to include your GPA on your resume, even after you have some professional experience, but those are usually academic positions or roles that require specialized education. 

For the most part, if you're approaching five years of experience, you share your GPA only if they ask.

At this point in your career, your accomplishments and professional skills should do most of the talking on your resume. Your education section should be at the bottom and take up very minimal space. 

Here's an example of a resume Education section for an experienced professional:

Bachelor of Arts in Communications | ABC College | 2022

With that said, if you've completed any certifications or professional development courses, then you can add them. This is an example of what that would look like:

EDUCATION & CREDENTIALS

Academic Qualifications

Certifications :

Certification #1 | Certification #2 | Certification #3

Professional Development:

Professional Development Class #1 | Professional Development Class #2 | Professional Development Class #3 

Frequently asked questions about including GPA on your resume

1. should you always include your gpa on your resume.

Not necessarily – you should only include your GPA on your resume if you're a recent graduate and it's higher than 3.5/4.0. If you have some experience under your belt, exclude it unless the job posting specifically requests it.

2. Do employers really check GPA or is it just a formality?

Most employers don't check GPAs unless the job requires that you have a specific result. Entry-level positions and roles requiring specialized knowledge may check your GPA, but those are generally the only times it'll be checked.

3. Can you round up your GPA when adding it to your resume?

Being transparent and honest on your resume is always going to serve you better than rounding up a few decimal places. Employers are less concerned about your adult report card than they are about being certain that they can trust you. Never lie about your GPA on your resume. 

4. Should I include my high school GPA on my resume if I didn't go to college?

You should never include high school on your resume at all unless you're still in high school and applying for a part-time role. If you've begun college, there's definitely no need to include high school, as it's obvious that you did well or you wouldn't be in college. Plus, keep in mind that adding high school doesn't say, “I finished high school.” Rather, it says, “I didn't go to college.”

5. What should you do if your GPA is low, but you have relevant experience?

Your experience, qualifications, and career achievements will always trump what you did in school. Because of this, once you have experience, you can – and should – exclude your GPA from your resume. 

Employers want the full package

At the end of the day, the question isn't really, “Should I include my GPA on my resume?” Instead, you should be more focused on crafting a compelling resume that is tailored to a specific job description and shows that you're the best candidate for an open position. 

Employers are more concerned about what you can do and how your skills and experiences are in line with the position they have open. It doesn't matter if you're a new graduate or an experienced professional, accomplishments win the day every time.

TopResume specializes in crafting resumes that go above and beyond to demonstrate that your skills, qualifications, and achievements match the job you want. Your career journey is unique and, whether you include your GPA on your resume or not, it needs to tell your story in a way that will impress hiring managers. Why not submit your resume for a free resume review to ensure it hits the mark?

Recommended reading:

5 Things You Must Not Include on Your Resume

How to Make a Great Resume With No Experience

What Should I Say About My Education On My Resume?

Related Articles:

Do Hiring Managers Actually Read Cover Letters?

How to Create a Resume With No Education

Why You Lose When You Lie on Your Resume: Learning From Mina Chang

See how your resume stacks up.

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Should You Include GPA on Your Resume? (Tips & Examples)

  • Klara Cervenanska , 
  • Updated November 10, 2023 9 min read

To include your GPA on resume or not to include it — that is the question.

When you're in school, your GPA seems like the single most important estimate of your success. But is it really that important for your potential employer?

In order to create a killer resume you have to carefully pick which components are relevant and important enough to include in your resume. 

To help you make the right decision, we’ve created a short guide to everything you need to know regarding GPA on resume!

Table of Contents

Click on a section to skip

What is a GPA?

Should you put a gpa on your resume, do employers check your gpa and how important is it, really, how to put a gpa on you resume, should i mention a gpa on my linkedin profile.

Your GPA, which is short for Grade Point Average, is a number that evaluates how well you did during the entirety of your degree program. It’s meant to place you on a GPA scale between 1.0 and 4.0 — with 4.0 being the perfect score. 

Average GPA is 2.8 , however, only a value higher than 3.5 on a 4.0 scale is impressive enough to include on your resume.

There are a few different types of GPAs, however, only two of them are relevant to your resume — Overall GPA and Major GPA.

  • Overall GPA refers to the overall grade from all the courses you took in college.
  • Major GPA considers only the grades you got in your declared major.

Simply pick the one that is higher . Additionally, you should go for your Major GPA when it is more relevant to the job you’re applying for. 

Impressive GPA?

Make sure your resume is just as breathtaking.

The truth is that adding this component to your resume is optional. Because of that, it can be a little tricky to decide whether to include your GPA on resume or not.

In some cases yes, it can be a nice way of highlighting your good performance, however, in other cases it can actually harm your chances of getting a job.

When to include a GPA on your resume

Generally, you should include your GPA on resume if:

  • Your potential employer requests GPA on resume
  • You're applying for your first job
  • You've been out of school for under 3 years
  • Your GPA is 3.5 and higher

This goes without saying, but if an employer requests that you include a GPA in your resume, then you have to respect that no matter what score your GPA is.

If you're still in college or this is one of the first jobs you're applying for , naturally, you have little to no relevant work experience . This is when your GPA can be regarded as an indicator of your performance. But remember, only if your GPA is higher than 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.

A score lower than 3.5 is not particularly noteworthy and can actually decrease the chances of you being hired. 

When not to include GPA on a resume

In some cases, including a GPA score on your resume can also be a pretty bad decision.

Avoid listing your GPA on resume if:

  • Your GPA is lower than 3.5
  • You've been out of school for more than 3 years
  • This is not your first job application

Score lower than 3.5 is not bad, however, it's not really worth mentioning either. Many people have an average GPA, which means you won't stand out. Instead you'll blend with everyone else.

Additionally, your potential employer can regard a lower GPA as an indicator of weak work ethic. 

There's a point when your GPA simply becomes less important. Trust us, you don't want to be the 36-year old still flaunting their GPA at every chance they get.

So, when you're out of school for more than 3 years or you've had a job before — relevant work experience and professional achievements matter a lot more.

The truth is that many small companies don't care about your GPA, and therefore, they'll probably not check the validity of the score.

However, large companies often expect to see your GPA — In fact, 67% of companies said they screened candidates by their GPA , according to a survey.

Similarly, in 2018 when the National Association of Colleges and Employers asked employers about the influence of the attributes employers seek on a candidates resume — a high GPA was rated 3.4 on a 5-point scale, which accounts to a moderately high influence:

As you can see from the chart above, your GPA influences employers’ opinions even more than your extracurricular activities, studies abroad, or your volunteer work .

Also, in a Forbes interview with Dan Black, the director of recruiting for the Americas at Ernst & Young, he says about GPA: “It’s really one of the only indications we have of a student’s technical ability or competence to do the job.”

So, do employers check your GPA? As you can see, very often they do.

It's important to be honest, as employers normally request a copy of a student's transcript in one third of cases. After all, you don't want to be remembered for lying on your resume, do you?

If you decide to include GPA on your resume, you need consider a few things.

Where do I list it? Should I round it up? If so, do I round up or round down? What's the difference between cumulative and overall GPA? Or should I use my major GPA instead? 

Don't worry — keep on reading to get all the answers.

Where do I put my GPA on resume?

Firstly, it's important to know where to place your GPA on your resume. You have two options:

1. Education section

Put your GPA directly in your resume education section . Which should look something like this:

2. Achievements section

Alternatively, you can include your GPA in your resume achievements section . However, when you decide to opt for this option — your GPA score should be very high.

What about rounding up your GPA?

Yes, you can round up your GPA on resume. However, you should only round up to one decimal place . In some cases, you shouldn't be rounding up at all. And finally, you may even have to round down. 

How many decimals should a GPA score have? The standard is one decimal place. 

Here are some examples:

  • 3.49 GPA would round up to 3.5
  • 3.43 GPA would round down to 3.4 
  • 3.98 GPA would round down to 3.9 — this is because 4.0 GPA is reserved for the perfect score, which is not rounded and is truly 4.0 (consider leaving it at 3.98 in such case)

A correct rounding of a GPA on your resume is particularly important in areas such as banking, investment and finance. Learn how to make your banking resume stand out.

Cumulative GPA? Major GPA? Overall GPA?

It can seem a bit confusing. But here's a simple table of differences:

  • Cumulative GPA: An average grade of a particular semester or term from one particular institute.
  • Overall GPA: An average of all the cumulative GPAs.
  • Major GPA: An average based on all upper division courses attempted in the major department or required by the major.

Basically, your potential employer doesn't care about the GPA you got during a particular semester or term. They care about your absolute performance which is judged on the basis of overall GPA.

Therefore, use overall GPA on your resume.

Major GPA is okay to use on your resume as well. Sometimes it's even better to use major GPA rather than overall GPA. This is either when your major GPA is higher than overall GPA or —  when your major is very relevant to the job you're applying for.

Well, basically all we've mentioned regarding GPA on resumes applies for LinkedIn as well. Do put your GPA on LinkedIn if you're still a student or you've recently graduated and your GPA is impressive — 3.5 GPA and higher on a 4.0 scale.

Don't put GPA on your resume if it's lower than 3.5 on a 4.0 scale and you have had some work experience after graduating from university. As you acquire work experience, GPA becomes less important for your potential employer.

Christy's word of advice

If you’re a recent graduate, a good GPA is definitely worth including, as it gives potential employers insight into how well you’ve mastered the academic side of a particular subject. If it’s lower than you’d hoped, just leave it off and focus on other details such as final year modules (which can be great ATS keywords), thesis title, and any academic societies you were involved in. After you build up some work experience — let’s say a year or two — your GPA will be less important anyway, so you can simply leave it off.

Christy Morgan, Resident HR Expert

Key takeaways

Here's everything you need to know regarding a GPA on a resume:

  • You're applying for your first job or you've been out of school for under 3 years
  • It's not your first job application
  • Large companies often expect to see your GPA because it's one of the only indications of a student's ability and performance — And yes, they do check it.
  • When you decide to include your GPA in your resume, place it either in the education section or the achievement section.
  • You should round up or round down your GPA score so that it only has one decimal place. Do this with caution.
  • Use overall GPA or major GPA depending on which one is higher.
  • You can put GPA on your LinkedIn profile too — it's optional and same rules apply.

You should carefully select which components are relevant and important enough to include in your resume in order to create a great resume . We've got you covered with these resume and cover letter guides:

  • A Step-by-Step Guide: How to Write a Professional Resume in 2020
  • 7 Quick Tips to Prepare Your Resume for World with Coronavirus [Infographic]
  • How to Prepare Your Resume for Job Search During the Coronavirus Outbreak

Go beyond your GPA.

Stand out from the crowd with a killer resume.

Got the inside scoop on including GPA on your resume? That's a great start! Now, bring your resume game up a notch by taking inspiration from our professionally curated resume samples .

Klara graduated from the University of St Andrews in Scotland. After having written resumes for many of her fellow students, she began writing full-time for Kickresume. Klara is our go-to person for all things related to student or 'no experience resumes'. At the same time, she has written some of the most popular resume advice articles on this blog. Her pieces were featured in multiple CNBC articles. When she's not writing, you'll probably find her chasing dogs or people-watching while sipping on a cup of coffee.

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Should You Put Your GPA on Your Resume?

When to put your GPA on your resume and how to do it strategically. And when to avoid putting your GPA on your resume altogether.

a year ago   •   4 min read

Whether you've spent countless nights studying, sacrificing social time, and meeting deadlines to earn a high GPA, or you've faced challenges that may have impacted your academic performance, you're now faced with a common question: should you include your GPA on your resume?

We completely understand the pressure and uncertainty that comes with this decision, no matter what your GPA is.

So, let's explore the pros and cons of including your GPA on your resume, and help you make the best decision for your career goals and aspirations.

If you don’t have a ton of time, here’s a TLDR that answers 50% of your questions. We’ll go into more detail about specific situations in the rest of the article.

Include your GPA only if you’re a student or recent graduate and your GPA is 3.5 or higher. If you have a low GPA or have been out of school for a while, your GPA does not belong on your resume. If this is the case, no problem — we’ll cover alternative ways to highlight your incredible skill set.

When to put your GPA on your resume

You’ve worked hard, and you want potential employers to know it. An impressive GPA can draw attention to your credentials and academic achievements.

If you are a recent grad, you probably don’t have a ton of work experience. Your high GPA will show how qualified you are for the position anyway, especially if you’re applying for a job within your field of study. If you were a marketing major and you’re now applying for a role at an advertising agency, for instance, your high GPA will be an asset.

We’ve identified some general rules to help you decide whether or not to include your GPA in your resume.

Add your GPA to your resume if:

  • Your potential employer specifically requests it.
  • You have a GPA of 3.5 or higher.
  • You are still in school.
  • You are applying for your first job after graduating.
  • You have graduated within the last 2 or 3 years.
  • You are applying for an entry-level job.
  • You did not graduate with the Latin honors title (which already implies a high GPA).

Where to put your GPA on your resume

If you’ve decided that putting your GPA on your resume is the right move, do it strategically:

Here’s an example of a GPA on a resume:

Example of a GPA on a resume

Add it in the education section, right under your degree. As universities sometimes use different grading systems, use a backslash (/) to specify what your GPA score is ‘out of.’ The denominator can make a difference because in some schools, for instance, an A+ is a GPA score of 4.5.

Under your GPA, list your awards,relevant coursework, major projects, extracurriculars and practicums.

Overall, deciding how to format your GPA on your resume can be tricky. To elevate your education section and tackle any unanswered questions, check out our recent post The Must-Haves When Writing Your Education on Your Resume .

When not to put your GPA on your resume

So, while a GPA on your resume could work to your advantage, sometimes it’s better to leave it out completely.

If your GPA is below 3.5, you may feel disheartened now that you are unable to include. We promise — years from now your GPA will never come up.

Plus, if you don’t have an impressive GPA, you can still stand out as the talented and hardworking candidate that you are.

How to highlight your education without a high GPA

You passed the courses and gained all the skills that come along with them, which you can highlight without mentioning your grade.

Let’s say, for instance, you just finished a degree in computer science and are looking for a job in the field. List coursework that showcases your relevant skills — UX design? Data analysis? Technical writing?

Insert keywords that will really make your resume stand out from the crowd. Take advantage of our Application Tracking Systems keyword search tool to make sure you're using the right language for your industry.

Use the tool below to get a list of skills and keywords relevant to the industry or role you're interested in.

Getting started

Again, if you are a current student or recent graduate with a high GPA, do it!

If you’ve been out of school for a while, and/or have a GPA under 3.5, don’t do it!

We hope that this post has been helpful. Once you’ve put our advice into action, we’re happy to review it for you. In fact, you can even put it to the test using our free Score My Resume tool below :

Frequently Asked Questions:

We’ll leave you with some FAQs about GPAs on resumes.

Will employers hire candidates with low GPAs?

Yes and no.

Some companies will actually ask candidates for their GPAs. This could be due to GPA cutoffs, which means that they will only consider candidates with a certain GPA or higher.

Also, certain industries place a higher emphasis on academic achievements than others, such as engineering and finance.

On the other hand, if the role you are applying for involves creative or hands-on work, your GPA may not be as relevant as your performance and portfolio.

How do you format your GPA on your resume?

Write your GPA as shown in the above example, with two decimal places.

If you earned a spot on the Dean’s list , put it on the same line as your GPA. Indicate which academic year(s) you received the title.

If you achieved honors, write summa cum laude in place of a GPA score.

Should you list your major or cumulative GPA?

It depends.

Your major GPA is your average grade earned in the courses related to your major. Your cumulative GPA is the average of all your courses combined.

If they are both higher than 3.5, list them both. If your major GPA is much higher than your cumulative GPA, or vice versa, only list one.

Can you round up your GPA on your resume?

Instead of rounding up, use the first two decimal places..

Rounding up your GPA would be lying . Instead, focus on your other projects and experiences that got you where you are today.

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round up gpa on resume

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How to List GPA on Your Resume

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Should you put your GPA on your resume?

Is rounding up your gpa on your resume acceptable.

  • Overall GPA versus Major GPA

How to correctly put your GPA on your resume

What to put on your resume instead of your gpa, key takeaways.

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If you’re feeling  unsure if you should put your GPA on your resume, don’t worry! You aren’t alone. So, the first thing you need to do is to make sure that it’s even necessary  in relation to the job you’re applying for.

In this article, we’ll look at some of the more common issues surrounding the inclusion of your GPA on a resume. We’ll cover:

  • Why you should or shouldn’t include your GPA on a resume.
  • If rounding up your GPA is advisable.
  • How to put it in your resume effectively and show you a couple of examples.
  • Which is better - Cumulative GPA vs. major GPA.
  • What to put on your resume instead of your GPA.

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This is the million-dollar question. But first, you need to answer a few other questions:

  • Have you recently graduated?
  • Are you lacking in professional work experience?
  • Is your GPA over 3.5?
  • Is a GPA relevant to the position you’re applying for?

If you answered yes to all of these, then it’s likely you should include your GPA on your resume. However, if you answered no to any of them, it might be better to go ahead and leave it out.

When not to include your GPA

  • Leave out your GPA if you've worked over five years, focusing instead on professional experience.
  • Exclude any lower GPAs ( below 3. 5 or the employer's specified threshold). Instead, highlight skills and achievements.
  • For mid to senior-level roles, GPA relevance decreases in favor of showcasing work accomplishments and capabilities.

Rounding your GPA up can be a delicate issue, and opinions can vary among employers and career advisors. Keep these points in mind:

Honesty and integrity:  Your resume should accurately reflect your qualifications and achievements. Misrepresenting your GPA, even by rounding up, can be seen by many as dishonest. Employers value integrity, and any indication that you’re not being completely honest can be a red flag.

Rounding norms:  If you do choose to round your GPA, it's generally acceptable to round to the nearest tenth (e.g., 3.56 to 3.6). However, rounding up a 3.45 to 3.5, for example, might be seen as misleading. It's important to note that there's a difference between rounding * and inflating  your GPA .

Transcripts and verification: Remember that many employers may request a copy of your transcripts for verification purposes, especially if your academic background is a key factor in the hiring process. Any discrepancies between your resume and your official transcripts can lead to questions about your honesty.

So, rounding your GPA may be a bad idea if it’s going to mislead your potential employer. Take caution and only do so to the nearest tenth.

Rounding is a legitimate mathematical practice that makes your GPA easier to read and understand, without significantly altering the information it conveys - GPA 3.58 > 3.60

Inflating is a deceptive practice aimed at creating a false impression of your academic performance. GPA 3.20 > 3.60

Overall  GPA versus Major GPA

As a student you have two different Grade Point Averages - your overall GPA and your major GPA.

  • Overall GPA: Takes into consideration all the grades you have received throughout your college or university studies, across all courses. Overall GPA provides a comprehensive view of your academic abilities and work ethic.
  • Major GPA: This refers to the grades you received in courses specifically related to your major area of study. Major GPA can be particularly relevant if the courses are closely related to the job or industry you're targeting.

Which One to Include on Your Resume?

  • If your overall GPA is strong : Include your overall GPA if it's strong (3.5 or above) and reflects well on your overall academic performance. It's a good indicator of your work ethic and ability to perform across a range of subjects.
  • If your major GPA is higher: If your major GPA is significantly higher than your overall GPA and relevant to the job you're applying for, consider including it either instead of or alongside your overall GPA.

You have a couple of options when listing them, you can:

  • Include both: Include both to showcase your academic achievements fully. For example, "Overall GPA: 3.6, Major GPA: 3.8".
  • Choose the best one: Choose the one that is most relevant and favorable to your job application. For instance, if applying for a technical job related to your major, your major GPA (if higher) would be more relevant.

If you have decided to include your GPA, let’s make sure to do it the right way! It’s going to go in the education section on your resume , but here are a few more things you should NOT overlook:

Where to Place Your GPA:

  • Place it near your degree and the name of your institution.

How to Format Your GPA:

  • Keep your resume GPA to two decimal places (e.g., 3.67). This is precise without being overly detailed.
  • You may round your GPA to the nearest tenth (e.g., 3.7) for simplicity, but make sure this does not significantly misrepresent your actual performance.
  • Label it clearly by writing "GPA" followed by the score, such as "GPA: 3.67."

Additional Tips:

  • If your major GPA is significantly higher than your overall GPA, and it's relevant to the job, you might choose to include it as well. Clearly label it as "Major GPA" to avoid confusion.

Here’s a basic example with GPA:

*Note: For the above GPA of 3.68, it would be acceptable to round it up to 3.7.

Here’s another example. However, this time we include both the overall GPA and the major GPA:

  • • Major GPA: 3.68

round up gpa on resume

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If you happen to not have an extremely strong GPA , there are still many things you can add to your resume to make yourself stand out to employers! Focusing on these aspects can illustrate your skills, experiences, and achievements that happen to be more relevant to the job you’re applying for:

  • Relevant work experience
  • Projects and portfolio  
  • Certifications and courses
  • Awards and honors
  • Extracurricular activities
  • Volunteer work
  • Professional memberships
  • Publications and presentations
  • Relevant coursework

By emphasizing these elements, you can create a compelling resume that highlights your strengths and abilities beyond your GPA. Tailor your resume to each job application, focusing on the experiences and skills most relevant to the job description to make the strongest impact.

Including your GPA is a nuanced topic that depends on several things. However, it can be pretty cut and dry if you make your decision based on just a few points. Here are the main points to take away from this article::

  • If your GPA is lower than 3.5, don’t even bother including it.
  • Before listing it, make sure it’s even relevant to the position you’re applying for.
  • In general, rounding up your GPA by more than a tenth is looked down upon as it can be construed as dishonest.
  • Your overall GPA (the average grade throughout all university over all subjects) and your major GPA (the average grade of courses specifically related to your major area of study) can either be listed together or alone.
  • Your GPA needs to go into your education section and be written using only two decimal places max (e.g. 3.72)
  • There are tons of other things you can include on your resume that more than compensate for not listing your GPA.

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How to Write Your GPA on a Resume

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Should you write your resume with a GPA?

How to write your gpa on your resume, faqs about adding your gpa to your resume, template for including gpa on a resume, example of gpa with academic achievements on a resume.

Your resume is a formal representation of yourself. Your employer is likely to base their recruitment decision on the information you provide in your resume. Thus, it is crucial to add all the relevant material in your resume to create a positive impression. You can follow these steps to determine whether you should add your GPA to your resume.

Here are some situations in which you should include your GPA on your resume:

The employer requests it

Adding your GPA to your resume is usually optional. Sometimes, however, the employer may explicitly ask you to add GPA on your resume.

You have a high GPA

You may mention your GPA if it is at least 3.5, as it can help demonstrate that you value high quality in your work. Employers may also consider a high GPA as a sign that you can handle work pressure and succeed at multiple tasks.

You’re new to the workforce

Fresh graduates may include their GPA within two to three years of their graduation. Your GPA can be helpful if you haven’t yet gained much work experience. It can also give the employer insight into your field interests and work ethic. Be prepared to have transcripts or test scores available if the employer ask for them. 

Follow these steps to write your GPA on your resume:

1. Firstly, consider the placement of the GPA

Your GPA’s placement on the resume can have an impact on what type of impression you want to make on an employer. You may mention your GPA at the start of your education section if you have graduated with a particular honor. You can also specify the GPA in front of your majors. However, it may be beneficial to mention your GPA in a separate section than your academic honors, giving you the opportunity to create a more comprehensive achievements section.

2. Secondly, format your GPA appropriately

Formatting is crucial when creating a professional and formal look for your resume. Clearly label the GPA wherever you place it. Writing random numbers may confuse the hiring manager, so you can create a separate list of your major’s and overall GPA. Putting your GPA in parentheses is also an effective method to make it prominent.

3. Thirdly, emphasize your academic accomplishments

You don’t need to focus solely on your GPA when discussing your education. Support your GPA with other academic achievements that are related to the job. For example, if you are applying for a copywriting position, you may mention any national or international writing contests you won in addition to your GPA.

4. Next, only include your real GPA 

Only include your real GPA if it is exceptional. If your overall GPA is lower than 3.5, it may be better to leave it out. However, you could also add a specific GPA to create a better impression. For example, if your overall grades are lower, but the GPA in your job-related subjects is high, you may mention this GPA on your resume instead.

5. Then, round off to two decimal places

It’s usually recommended to round off your GPA to a maximum of two decimal places. For example, if you graduated with a GPA of 3.449, you would round it up to a 3.45.

6. After that, make sure you add the type of GPA the employer prefers

Some employers have specific guidelines on the type of GPA they prefer to see on resumes. For example, the employer may either ask for your overall GPA or the GPA in your major. If this isn’t mentioned in the job posting, opt to include your overall GPA.

7. Next, always emphasize relevant experience along with GPA

You should include any relevant job experience to your resume before adding your GPA. Your job experience creates a professional impression on employers. Add your GPA after mentioning the job experiences to improve the image it creates of you.

8. Finally, understand your strengths and priorities

If you have mentioned your GPA while considering all the other aspects of your resume, make sure you feel confident about it. Your GPA can be a useful addition to your resume, but only if it complements the other information you provide. Once you’ve been in the workforce for a few years, your GPA is generally less important than the experience you’ve gained in your field. An exception would be if you’ve gone back to school to pursue a different career path. Once you rejoin the workforce in a different field, it may help to add your GPA after the first couple of years.

Here are some of the questions and answers related to adding GPA in a resume:

Should I add a GPA that’s lower than 3.5?

It’s usually recommended to add your GPA only if it is 3.5 or higher since this can show an employer that you highly value hard work and quality. You may prefer including related job or internship experiences if your GPA is lower than 3.5.

My employer asked for my GPA. Which one should I include?

If an employer mentions that you must include your GPA on the resume, be sure to check the guidelines to make sure you add the right one. If there is some sort of confusion, you may add both your overall and your major GPA. Another approach is to consult the employer regarding their exact GPA requirements.

I have a strong resume, but my low GPA may cost me a job opportunity. Should I lie about my GPA?

A strong resume with relevant work experience and achievements can help you get the job, regardless of your GPA. You must only include your real GPA on the resume. If the actual GPA is low, use your cover letter or interview to highlight your other strengths or achievements.

Is my GPA significant to the employer?

Most employers are looking for practical experience compared to academic excellence. They may be interested in your GPA if you’re new to the workforce. However, if you’ve already gained a few years of professional experience, employers are typically more interested in your past positions.

Here’s a template you can use when including your GPA on your resume:

[Years attended] 

[Name of Degree]

[School attended]

[Numerical GPA]

Here’s an example of how to list your GPA along with your academic achievements on your resume:

Overall GPA 3.7| Major GPA 3.9

  • Dean’s list from 2010 to 2014
  • Student of the Year 2012
  • The Young Literature Prize – International Literature Association
  • Active member of student government from 2010 to 2012

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Can You Round Up GPA on Resume?

can you round up gpa on resume

Crafting an appealing resume is crucial to securing job interviews, and many wonder if rounding their GPA is a viable option. While this may seem harmless, it’s essential to understand the potential implications and alternatives before deciding whether to round up your GPA on a resume.

GPA, or grade point average, is a widely recognized benchmark of academic performance. Employers may use GPA as a screening tool in the hiring process to assess an applicant’s ability, dedication, and potential for success. Given its significance, the approach to presenting your GPA on a resume can leave a lasting impression on recruiters and impact your chances of being selected for an interview.

There’s considerable debate on whether rounding up a GPA on resumes is ethical, and doing so can pose risks to your professional reputation if it is deemed dishonest by potential employers. With that in mind, it’s helpful to explore alternative means to highlight your skills and accomplishments that align with the job requirements while avoiding compromising your integrity on your resume.

Key Takeaways

  • Rounding up GPA on a resume is a topic of debate and may lead to ethical concerns
  • Misrepresenting your GPA can negatively impact your professional reputation
  • Consider showcasing your skills and accomplishments in alternative ways to embody your potential for success.

A poster stating 'Rounding the GPA for resumes' with a picture of a wizard holding a magic wand

Understanding GPA

GPA, or Grade Point Average, is a crucial metric that represents a student’s academic performance during their time at an educational institution. It is calculated by taking the average of a student’s grades for all courses, weighted by the number of credits for each course. In this section, we will explore the two main types of GPA: Major GPA and Overall GPA .

A student’s Major GPA is calculated by using only the courses relevant to their chosen major or program. This GPA emphasizes one’s core knowledge in their specific field of study. Some employers may value the Major GPA more, as it provides a better understanding of a candidate’s proficiency in their chosen area of expertise.

Here’s a summary of Major GPA:

  • Comprises only courses related to the major
  • Emphasizes core knowledge in a specific field
  • May be valued more by employers in field-specific roles

Female student holding her resume, presumably with a GPA section. This visually represents the concept of GPA and its significance.

Overall GPA

In contrast, the Overall GPA is a cumulative metric that includes all courses taken by the student, regardless of whether they are related to the major or not. This GPA gives an accurate representation of a student’s overall academic performance across all subject areas.

Characteristics of Overall GPA:

  • Includes all courses taken during college
  • Showcases a student’s broader academic performance
  • May be valued more highly by employers seeking well-rounded candidates

When considering whether to round up a GPA on a resume, it is essential to understand the differences between Major GPA and Overall GPA, as well as how each one could impact a candidate’s chances of being considered for a role.

The Great GPA Debate

When crafting a resume, many job seekers wonder whether or not to include their GPA. If you have a high GPA, such as 3.5 or above, it’s generally an attractive element to showcase on your resume. In this case, mentioning your GPA can demonstrate your hard work and academic prowess.

However, the question remains: should you round up your GPA on your resume? Rounding up a GPA is not a universally accepted practice. Some employers may see it as dishonest or misleading since it doesn’t accurately represent your academic performance. As a result, it’s better to be transparent and list your exact GPA rather than rounding it up.

In some cases, if you have a GPA lower than 3.5, it may not be necessary to mention it on your resume at all. This is because employers in certain industries may place minimal emphasis on GPA, focusing instead on relevant job experience, skills, and certifications.

That being said, certain fields and organizations hold GPA in high regard. For example, competitive industries like finance and consulting tend to value high GPA scores. In these cases, listing your GPA becomes paramount, especially if you know the company has a specific GPA cutoff.

Rounding the GPA

When including your GPA on your resume, it’s important to remain truthful and accurate while also presenting the most favorable depiction of your academic performance. Rounding your GPA can be an effective way to accomplish this objective. There are three common methods for rounding GPAs: rounding to the nearest tenth, rounding to the nearest hundredth, and rounding up to one decimal place.

Man trying to calculate his GPA by rounding to nearest tenth, hundredth or one-decimal round-up.

Nearest Tenth

Rounding your GPA to the nearest tenth is a simple and widely accepted method. To do this, you will round your GPA to one decimal place, using standard rounding rules (e.g., 3.77 becomes 3.8 and 3.74 would be 3.7). This method provides a clean and concise representation of your GPA without straying too far from the precise value.

Nearest Hundredth

Another approach to rounding your GPA is by rounding to the nearest hundredth. This method retains a more accurate representation of your GPA, as it includes two decimal places. With this method, you will round your GPA to the second decimal place (e.g., 3.764 becomes 3.76 and 3.765 becomes 3.77). This level of precision may be particularly useful if your GPA falls very close to a specific benchmark that you want to emphasize on your resume.

One-Decimal Round-Up

Lastly, some individuals might choose to round their GPA up to the nearest whole number or one decimal place (e.g., 3.5 becomes 4.0). While this method does provide a potentially more impressive representation of your academic performance, it is crucial to note that this approach can be considered deceptive or misleading by employers. It is generally not recommended to round up your GPA to such an extent, as it may negatively impact your credibility during the hiring process.

By using the proper method of rounding your GPA on your resume, you can ensure that you are presenting an accurate, yet flattering, depiction of your academic achievements. In doing so, you can maintain your credibility while showcasing your performance in the best possible light.

Ethics of Rounding GPA

When deciding whether to round up a GPA on a resume, it is important to consider the ethical implications. Honesty is a key component of any job application, as employers value truthfulness and integrity in their employees. Deliberately misrepresenting information on a resume can be seen as dishonest and may cause potential employers to question the candidate’s character.

A student in graduation robes, looking contemplative or reflective, representing the ethical considerations of the decision.

From an ethical standpoint, rounding a GPA can be a gray area. Some may argue that rounding up a GPA by a small margin is acceptable, while others believe it compromises the individual’s integrity . The key factor to consider is the degree to which the GPA is being rounded. Falsifying information by significantly rounding up a GPA may lead to repercussions and damage an applicant’s credibility.

To maintain a transparent and ethical application process, it is advisable for candidates to check with their academic institution about GPA rounding policies. Some schools may provide guidelines for rounding GPAs on resumes and job applications, while others may not.

Risks of Rounding Up

Rounding up a GPA on a resume may initially seem like a harmless and even smart tactic to present oneself as a stronger candidate. However, there are risks associated with this decision, which can potentially harm a job seeker’s reputation and future employment prospects.

A job interviewer examining a resume closely with a magnifying glass, suggesting the scrutiny that resumes may undergo.

One significant risk is that potential employers may run a background check to verify the information provided on a resume . These checks often include a review of an applicant’s academic credentials, such as their GPA. Should discrepancies be found between the submitted resume and the actual GPA, employers may perceive this as dishonesty and question the applicant’s integrity. This can result in a damaged professional reputation and even disqualification from the job opportunity.

Another potential risk of rounding up a GPA is that it might lead to unrealistic expectations from employers. Employers may have specific GPA standards for certain positions or industries, and candidates presenting a higher GPA may be expected to perform at that higher level. If the candidate is unable to meet these expectations, it could reflect poorly on their job performance and future growth within the company.

Additionally, rounding up a GPA might raise red flags during the interview process. Interviewers may ask specific questions related to the candidate’s academic performance or projects to assess their problem-solving abilities and subject-matter expertise. If the candidate is unable to provide satisfactory answers, it might lead the interviewer to question the legitimacy of the presented GPA.

While rounding up a GPA on a resume might be tempting, the risks far outweigh the potential benefits. It is crucial to maintain honesty and integrity when presenting one’s skills and qualifications to potential employers. This approach will help job seekers build trust, prevent potential disqualifications, and ultimately result in long-term career success.

GPA and Your Resume

The education section.

When crafting a resume, the education section plays a significant role in showcasing a candidate’s academic accomplishments. In this section, including a GPA can help demonstrate a strong academic record. For instance, a candidate with a 3.44 GPA can feature it on their resume as a testament to their dedication and hard work. However, it’s essential to know when and how to round up a GPA accurately.

When rounding up, follow the commonly accepted rule: round to the nearest tenth (for example, 3.44 would round to 3.4). Be cautious about rounding up too much, as this may not accurately represent a candidate’s true academic performance.

Work Experience

While the education section is essential, work experience can also play a crucial role in shaping a candidate’s resume. An individual with a solid work history may choose not to prioritize their GPA and focus on highlighting their professional achievements instead. However, recent graduates and those with limited work experience may still wish to emphasize their GPA, especially if it’s strong.

Awards and Achievements

Awards and achievements can bolster a resume, providing further evidence of a candidate’s skills and commitment to excellence. Including accomplishments such as dean’s list recognition, scholarships, honors, and extracurricular activities can accentuate a candidate’s overall qualifications.

In this case, mentioning a specific GPA—rounded up, but still accurate—can offer context for the significance of one’s academic accolades.

Impressions on Recruiters

When it comes to resumes, recruiters and employers pay close attention to the GPA of applicants, especially for entry-level positions. Many companies have specific GPA thresholds they use to screen candidates, making it essential for candidates to be transparent and honest about their GPA.

A recruiter reviewing a stack of resumes at a desk, with a focused expression, emphasizing the critical role of GPA in the recruitment process.

rounding up a candidate’s GPA on their resume might seem like a small detail, but it can have a significant impact on the impression they leave on recruiters. Even a slight increase in the GPA can be viewed as dishonest or unethical by a potential employer. This raises concerns about the candidate’s integrity and credibility, which are essential traits for a successful professional in any industry.

On the other hand, some recruiters may not be too concerned with whether or not the GPA is rounded up, as long as it meets a company’s minimum requirement. They may be more focused on other aspects of the resume, such as relevant experience and skill sets. However, misrepresenting the GPA can still be a risky move for candidates, as they must be prepared to explain the discrepancy if questioned.

In some cases, it may be permissible to round up GPA to a single decimal point (e.g., 3.4 instead of 3.397). However, it is always advisable to check the company’s policies regarding GPA rounding, as different employers may have different tolerances for rounding.

Alternative Ways to Showcase Your Skills

When it comes to showcasing your skills on a resume, there are several alternative approaches for students and experts alike. These alternatives can highlight your experience and abilities without the need to round up your GPA.

One effective method is to focus on specific courses or projects that demonstrate your expertise in a particular area. List these courses or projects in a dedicated section, detailing the skills you acquired and the outcomes you achieved. This will help potential employers understand the depth of your knowledge and its practical application.

Another strategy is to emphasize your work experience, internships, or part-time jobs. By showcasing your hands-on experience, you can demonstrate your ability to apply your education in real-world settings. Include a description of your roles, responsibilities, and accomplishments, which will provide context for the skills you possess.

Volunteer experience can also be a great way to emphasize your skills. Participation in community projects, non-profit organizations, or student clubs can demonstrate your commitment to your chosen field and your ability to work in a team or take on leadership roles. Be sure to include your involvement, accomplishments, and any relevant skills you gained throughout these experiences.

Lastly, don’t forget to highlight any additional certifications, training, or workshops you may have attended. By listing relevant professional development experiences, you can show your commitment to staying current with industry trends and advancements. This can be particularly beneficial for experts looking to maintain a competitive edge in their field.

Remember, even without a high GPA, there are plenty of ways to effectively showcase your skills and experience on your resume. By focusing on alternative methods, you can confidently present yourself as a strong candidate to potential employers.

While including a GPA on a resume can be beneficial, it is essential to be honest and accurate when rounding it up. Many recruiters and employers may perceive any inaccuracy as dishonesty or lack of attention to detail. To maintain a confident and knowledgeable image, it is advisable to round the GPA to one or two decimal places.

A hopeful graduate or job seeker holding their resume, looking towards the future.

In a job application, presenting a clear and well-structured CV is crucial. When deciding whether to round up the GPA, consider the context and the specific requirements for the position. Highlighting relevant skills, achievements, and experiences can often be more important than the exact GPA figure.

It is acceptable to round up the GPA on a resume, provided it is done reasonably and fairly. Maintain a neutral and transparent approach to showcasing your academic achievements, and remember that a strong CV has a balance between education, professional experience, and other relevant qualifications.

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When to Include a GPA on Your Resume

round up gpa on resume

  • When to Include a GPA
  • When Not to Include a GPA
  • How to List Your GPA on a Resume
  • Examples of Ways to Include Your GPA

Do you need to include your high school or college grade point average (GPA) on your resume ? When can you leave it off, and when should you leave it off?

In high school and college, job seekers tend to include their GPAs on their resumes, particularly if those GPAs are strong (generally above a 3.5). However, after graduating from college, it can be difficult to know when to remove that decimal number from your resume. If you have a good GPA, it's an asset on your resume.

If not, it could hurt your candidacy. That's especially the case when employers are seeking competitive candidates who have excelled in school.

A GPA listed in the education section of your resume can either help or hurt your chance of getting an interview. Make sure you know when to include this information, and when to leave it out.

When to Include a GPA on Your Resume

There is no specific rule about whether to keep or remove your GPA from your resume after college. However, the general guideline is that, during the first year or two after university, it's fine to keep your GPA on your resume.

This is particularly true if you have a very high GPA—about a 3.5 or above.

As a recent college graduate with limited work experience, your GPA can be a key reflection of your skills, your work ethic, and your personal drive to succeed.

In some cases, an employer might specifically ask for your GPA in the job posting or application. Be sure to list it when it's required, so that your application gets full consideration.

When Not to Include a GPA on Your Resume

Once you have 2-3 years of work experience, it is time to remove your GPA from your resume. At this point in life, your work experience speaks more to your skills than your old GPA. 

Let go of your past academic success, and use that extra space on your resume to provide an example of a more recent work accomplishment. This will demonstrate to employers that you are not “resting on your laurels” after school, but that you have matured into a forward-looking professional who is now fully engaged in your career.

Also be sure to leave out your high school GPA once you have been in college for a year or two. At this point, you have a college GPA you can include instead (unless that is very low). Another time you don’t want to include your GPA is when it is not very high. In particular, leave out your GPA if it is 3.0 or below. You can leave it off your resume even while you are still a student.

Remember to follow the instructions on the job listing. If the employer asks for your GPA, include it regardless of how high or low it is.

Tips for Including (or Not Including) Your GPA on Your Resume

Put it in the education section of your resume. Your GPA should go in the education section of your resume. This section will also include where you went to school and what degrees you received. You can also mention any academic honors and awards in this section.

Consider including your GPA for your major.  If your GPA for your major is higher than your overall GPA (which is common), you can include that instead of your overall GPA. If both are high, you can include both. Just be sure to clarify which is which.

Emphasize other academic accomplishments. Include other academic accomplishments along with your GPA to show that you are a hardworking, well rounded person. For example, mention if you were on the Dean’s List, received any Latin honors (such as cum laude or magna cum laude ), or if you won any academic awards.

If your GPA was not high but you won some other awards, include those awards, but leave out your GPA.

You can put this information in a subsection of your education section, titled “Awards and Honors” or something similar.

Don’t lie. While it is okay to leave your GPA out (unless the employer asks for it), it is not okay to lie about your GPA on your resume. It is very easy for an employer to verify your GPA by looking at your transcript. If you lie, you might lose a chance of getting the job, or (if you are already hired), you risk being fired.

Examples of Ways to Include Your GPA on Your Resume

Check out these four examples of ways to include your GPA in the education section of your resume. Download the resume template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Example of a Resume with GPA Included

EDUCATION Bachelor of Arts, XYZ College Major: Journalism GPA: 3.8 Magna Cum Laude 

Example of a Resume with Overall GPA and Major GPA Included

EDUCATION Bachelor of Science, XYZ College Major: Biology (3.89 Major GPA) Minor: Environmental Science 3.67 Overall GPA Magna Cum Laude

Example of Resume with Major GPA Only

EDUCATION Bachelor of Arts, XYZ University Major: Journalism (Major GPA 3.8) Awards: Outstanding Major in Journalism, Senior Capstone Project Finalist

Example of Resume with No GPA

EDUCATION B.S., XYZ University Major: Exercise Science Minor: Spanish

Resume Sample (Text Version)

Richard Reporter 3453 Overlook Avenue • Seattle, WA 98109 • (123) 456-7890 • rreporter@email.com www.linkedin.com/in/richardreporter

QUALIFICATIONS SUMMARY

Highly creative visual storyteller and photojournalist, demonstrating a powerful “nose for news” in following leads for rising stories. Well-versed in operation of video and microwave equipment, news vans, and cellular and fiber optic remotes; adept in editing and posting digital videos to websites and social media properties including Facebook and Twitter.

Technical Proficiencies : Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook), Adobe Creative Cloud (Premiere Pro, Premiere Rush, Photoshop, After Effects), Sony XpriNS

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE EMERALD CITY NEWS, Seattle, WA News Photographer  (06/2017-Present) Shoot and edit news video for major metropolitan media company. Operate videotape / solid state media cameras and portable microwave equipment; edit news stories with Sony XpriNS. Create digital content and post to social media sites.  Key Achievements:

  • Created compelling news videos that increased digital website traffic by 35%.
  • Meticulously maintained news van and state-of-the-art photographic equipment valued at $425,000.
  • Partnered with local police force, city court officials, and Chamber of Commerce to track and follow rising story leads.

EDUCATION Bachelor of Arts in Journalism; 3.89 Major GPA / 3.62 Overall GPA Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA Staff Writer / Photographer, The Gonzaga Bulletin; Senior Capstone Project Finalist

Member, National Press Photographers Association (NPPA)

Can I Round-Up my GPA?

Is rounding up your GPA allowed? Surprisingly the answer can be yes. We'll walk through the scenarios when this practice is acceptable and when it isn’t.

Let’s face it: your GPA is seen as a reflection of your educational effort and overall work ethic. This makes it an important part of career growth (like it or not.)

A high grade point average is an accomplishment that many new grads use to impress potential employers. The same is true for students applying for scholarships or wanting to be accepted into a certain school.

Many students who are looking for a competitive edge in their field consider rounding up their overall GPA to a higher number before adding it to a resume or job application. But should you do it?

A common question that comes up during all of these scenarios is whether or not it’s okay to round up one’s GPA . It might be tempting to use a GPA calculator and then bump the number a little bit. After all, a 3.0 GPA sounds a lot better than 2.95. This is especially important to students trying to meet a certain minimum GPA requirement.

But is GPA conversion ethical?

Rounding Up Your GPA

A high GPA alone probably won’t get you a job, but it can be the deciding factor between being given (or not given) an interview. If you’re wanting to land a job and are thinking of rounding up your GPA to provide yourself with an edge, you can proceed--but with caution.

Here are some general rules when it comes to GPA conversion :

Rounding up to the nearest tenth is acceptable. (3.68 = 3.7) but not to the nearest whole number. A 2.78 GPA does not round up to a 3.0.

Claiming a 4.0 you haven’t earned is a no-no. If you have a 3.92 and are wanting to convert to a 4.0, reconsider. Because achieving a 4.0 GPA is such a distinguished accomplishment, many career and resume experts advise against rounding in this situation.

Avoiding GPA to letter grade conversion is advised. Changing a 2.95 into a 3.0 might seem like a minor change but it actually alters the letter grade from a C to a B. This is a misrepresentation that could cost you a program spot or job if discovered.

Listing your true GPA is your best bet in some situations. For example, if you are filling out an online application that has two spots after the decimal, you should include all three numbers (3.92 instead of a 3.9).

Applying for a competitive position. When you know that transcripts are likely to be checked is a hard rounding “don’t.” Err on the side of caution and avoid rounding up your grade point average in instances where you know it will be double-checked or questioned.

Achieving a 4.0 GPA is a distinguished accomplishment and considered “perfect” by many institutions. For this reason, you should never round up to reach a 4.0 GPA on a resume or college application.

Proceed with Caution

Being able to do something doesn’t mean that you should. Think of it this way: you could go buy an extra-large pizza right now and eat the entire thing by yourself. But the aftermath would probably make you regret that decision.

Although bumping up your GPA might secure your place in the candidate pool, there is always the chance that someone could catch the discrepancy between the GPA you rounded up and the one on your actual transcripts. This could make you look dishonest or untrustworthy, which is why it is important to recognize the risk.

Consider Other Options

There are other things you can do to stand out during the application process if you decide rounding up your GPA isn’t right for you. These include:

Listing the GPA for your major instead of your overall grade point average (a GPA calculator can help with this)

Focusing on skills and experience instead of your GPA

Leaving it off of your resume all together if it is below a 3.0

Remember this: although future employers and admissions specialists will likely consider your GPA while you are first breaking into your field, it won’t be this way forever.

Once you have some time and experience under your belt, a 3.5 GPA will mean very little. Before rounding up your GPA, examine the pros and cons and look at other alternatives for accomplishing your goals. Your overall GPA doesn’t determine your worth, but your integrity is defined by your choices.

  • Letter A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F Percent 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82 81 80 79 78 77 76 75 74 73 72 71 70 69 68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 60
  • Grade A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F Weight Regular Honors AP / IB College

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How should I round my GPA on my finance resume?

In general, rounding your GPA will not make a huge difference. However, on a resume it almost always looks better to have a 3.3 as opposed to a 3.25 or a 3.5 as opposed to a 3.45.

Can You Round Up Your GPA On Your Resume

If you have a 3.3 or lower, you may have a hard time selling yourself as a 3.5 is generally considered to be the expected minimum GPA (however, this does not make 3.5 the GPA cutoff). If you have 3.35, rounding it up to 3.4 is a wise move. If you are over the cutoff mark, increasing your GPA by 0.1 will not add that much of a difference.

GPA Rounding Rules

Some easy guidelines for rounding include:

  • Never round your GPA to 4.0, even if you have a 3.99. Having a 3.9+ GPA is already very impressive, but rounding it to 4.0 may harm you more than help you. A 3.95 is almost equally as impressive, and someone reviewing your resume and transcripts might wonder what your thought process was in adding the extra five hundredths of a point. If you have a 3.95 or higher and the dropdown box on the application only allows for tenths, follow conventional rounding rules and round up.
  • Make sure you never round up to a quarter or half point . The only rounding that should be done is with hundredths of a point. If you have a 3.24, you may be able to get away with rounding up to a 3.3, but it's not generally advisable. If you have a x.x5 or higher, definitely feel free to round it up to the NEAREST tenth of a point. This topic has been debated heavily by the WSO community, so if you are unsure, please use the links below to get a better grasp on the reasoning behind rounding your GPA.

GPA Rounding Examples

Relevant discussions.

  • Ugh frustrating GPA rounding on resume question ( Note: This person's overall GPA is a 3.9. There is not point in putting the major GPA. If he were to put both on his resume, he should keep them both at the hundredths. If there was a dropdown box on an online application with only tenths, he would only be able to use his overall GPA which is a 3.9.)
  • 3.49 GPA ( Note: Yes, a 3.49 is a 3.5, though on your resume you should leave it to the hundredth. It really won't make a difference.)

Read More About GPAs on WSO

  • Canadian Grades To GPA?
  • Interview Call Due To Inflated Grades
  • Is This Ethical, Regarding Averaging Grades?

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IMAGES

  1. GPA on Resume

    round up gpa on resume

  2. Should You Include GPA on Your Resume? (Tips & Examples)

    round up gpa on resume

  3. How To Put Your Major Gpa On Resume

    round up gpa on resume

  4. Where To Put Gpa On Resume

    round up gpa on resume

  5. Should You Put Your GPA on Your Resume? (When & How to Include)

    round up gpa on resume

  6. GPA on Resume

    round up gpa on resume

COMMENTS

  1. Can You Round Up GPA on Resume? Not Always

    There's also a rounding GPA on resume to the nearest tenth; however, it is not recommended as it may seem dishonest. This will especially be an issue if the employer asks to see transcripts and compares the grades. Tuning up the grades to the nearest tenth means rounding a 3.35 Grade Point Average to a 3.4, and the difference is much bigger ...

  2. When to Include GPA on Your Resume (With Examples)

    Of course, including your GPA on your resume can certainly help your application to stand out from the crowd, but you should also showcase achievements you had during your time in college. Some examples of academic achievements include: Being on a fundraising committee for your fraternity. Helping students in the placement office at school.

  3. Is it acceptable to round up my GPA on my resume?

    Ethically, it is always best to round down slightly. If your GPA is 3.46251, I would specify it as 3.46. There isn't a big difference between 3.46 and 3.47, but 3.47 would be embellishing slightly, and that is not honorable. It would be honorable to round it down to 3.4, but it has the air of fact falsification to round it up to 3.5.

  4. GPA on Resume

    How to round up GPA on a resume Below is a table that shows examples when to round up and when to round down your GPA. As you can see in the table, you start with your calculated GPA (take the average of all courses) and then take some "action" (e.g. rounding GPA up or down) to arrive at your resume GPA.

  5. Should You Include GPA on Your Resume? (Tips & Examples)

    3.49 GPA would round up to 3.5; 3.43 GPA would round down to 3.4 ; 3.98 GPA would round down to 3.9 — this is because 4.0 GPA is reserved for the perfect score, which is not rounded and is truly 4.0 (consider leaving it at 3.98 in such case) A correct rounding of a GPA on your resume is particularly important in areas such as banking ...

  6. When To Include GPA On Your Resume (With Examples)

    Here are three situations when it might be a good idea to include your GPA on your resume: 1. If you're applying for jobs during school. If you're still in high school or college or recently graduated from one of those institutions, it might be important to include a GPA on your resume. If you have been out of school for three or more years, it ...

  7. Should You Put Your GPA on Your Resume?

    When not to put your GPA on your resume. So, while a GPA on your resume could work to your advantage, sometimes it's better to leave it out completely. If your GPA is below 3.5, you may feel disheartened now that you are unable to include. We promise — years from now your GPA will never come up. Plus, if you don't have an impressive GPA ...

  8. How and When To Include GPA on Your Resume

    There's no clear-cut rule that dictates when to include your GPA, but as we said, you should only keep it in your resume if it's over 3.5. In some cases, it's acceptable to put a rounded GPA on your resume. For example, if your GPA is 3.9, you can round it to 4.0 without any worries.

  9. Should You Put Your GPA on Your Resume?

    However, only include your GPA on your resume if it's 3.5 or above. Anything lower won't work in your favor. 2. You're a recent graduate. If you're writing a recent college graduate resume, your GPA is relevant unless you already have substantial work experience to highlight. Your GPA gives employers a better sense of your abilities ...

  10. When Should You List Your GPA on a Resume?

    So if your GPA is 3.69 or below, leave it off your resume. Not including your GPA won't shut doors that were meant to be open! Just make sure your resume highlights your skills and experience in a way that shows you're an achiever. If your GPA is low, my advice is don't sweat it.

  11. When Should You Include Your GPA on Your Resume?

    You should include your GPA in the education section of your resume, listing that information as close to your degree as possible. It's crucial that you include the accurate number rather than adjust your GPA in the hopes that it will garner more attention. Your resume should tell the truth. Whether you include your GPA or not, add any other ...

  12. Should I Put My GPA on My Resume [When, Where & How]

    Pro Tip: It's better to leave out your GPA entirely than make untrue statements. Don't lie about your GPA on a resume. In fact, lying on a resume is never a good idea. If your GPA is 3.5 or higher (on a 4-point scale), put it on your resume. And when your professional experience is non-existent, your GPA could be seen as a kind of ...

  13. Rounding GPA on a Resume

    Rounding GPA to the nearest tenth: 3.30. This could backfire. If the recruiters have set a minimum GPA score as a requirement and you can only achieve it by rounding, don't do it. The hiring official could ask for transcripts and notice that what you included in your resume is not what it actually is. If you do not meet the minimum GPA ...

  14. Resume with GPA

    5. Then, round off to two decimal places. It's usually recommended to round off your GPA to a maximum of two decimal places. For example, if you graduated with a GPA of 3.449, you would round it up to a 3.45. 6. After that, make sure you add the type of GPA the employer prefers.

  15. Is it ever acceptable to round up my GPA on my resume?

    Rounding 3.99 to 4.0 is rounding to a single decimal place, giving a maximum difference of almost 0.05. On a 4 point scale, that is ±1.25%. No problem on that front. But when you round 3.99 to 4.0, you are increasing the leftmost digit, which is a psychological sucker punch ( "you implied you're perfect, but you're not!

  16. Can You Round Up GPA on Resume?

    One-Decimal Round-Up. Rounds up GPA to the nearest whole number or one decimal place. 3.5 becomes 4.0. Table 2: Rounding the GPA. By using the proper method of rounding your GPA on your resume, you can ensure that you are presenting an accurate, yet flattering, depiction of your academic achievements.

  17. Should I put my GPA on my resume? · Resume.io

    Rounding GPA on resume. We know typing out "3.49" might bring a little tear to your eye, but our advice here is simple: Do not round your GPA up to the nearest decimal place (or round it down) on a resume. It should match precisely to the GPA on your school transcript. Related article. How to write a resume.

  18. When to Include a GPA on Your Resume

    Put it in the education section of your resume. Your GPA should go in the education section of your resume. This section will also include where you went to school and what degrees you received. You can also mention any academic honors and awards in this section. Consider including your GPA for your major.

  19. Can I Round-Up my GPA?

    A 2.78 GPA does not round up to a 3.0. Claiming a 4.0 you haven't earned is a no-no. If you have a 3.92 and are wanting to convert to a 4.0, reconsider. Because achieving a 4.0 GPA is such a distinguished accomplishment, many career and resume experts advise against rounding in this situation. Avoiding GPA to letter grade conversion is advised.

  20. Can You Round Up GPA on Resume?

    If you decide to do this, simply don't include a GPA section on your resume. For example, if you have a GPA of 2.7 and decided to round up it to 3.7, which is obviously a fake number, the employer will eventually find out and think that you`re trying to mislead them. Another issue comes when applicants want to round up their weighted GPAs.

  21. How should I round my GPA on my finance resume?

    However, on a resume it almost always looks better to have a 3.3 as opposed to a 3.25 or a 3.5 as opposed to a 3.45. Can You Round Up Your GPA On Your Resume. If you have a 3.3 or lower, you may have a hard time selling yourself as a 3.5 is generally considered to be the expected minimum GPA (however, this does not make 3.5 the GPA cutoff).

  22. My GPA is 3.57. Is it OK if I round it up to 3.6 on my resume ...

    I'm a recent graduate with little work experience, and I figured it might be a good idea to include my GPA on my resume. My GPA sits at 3.57. Do you guys think it would be wrong if I round it up to 3.6 on my resume? EDIT: I'm applying to internships and entry-level positions.

  23. rounding GPA on resume : r/resumes

    77 votes, 183 comments. true. my college recently registered all students (including me) for an on campus internship drive and asked us to upload our resumes on a college portal. their ats script automatically rejected all the resumes who have less than 7.5 cgpa (out of 10). mine was 6.93 and the only reason my gpa was trash is because of courses like sociology, democracy etc and i am an ...