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  • Should I write my CV in the...

Should I write my CV in the first person or third person?

3 min read · Updated on January 17, 2023

Laura Slingo

Unsure about current trends in CV writing? The answer is simpler than you think!

Each week, TopCV responds to user questions like the one below. We'll publish those answers here. Have a question for us? Have a look at our career advice or ask a question on our Quora page .

“Do you always write your CV in the third person?” — Martin B.

In short, you don't always have to write your CV in the third person – both the first and the third are acceptable.

However, the secret to great CV writing is removing the use of pronouns entirely; candidates don't need to use "I," "he," or "she," because its use is implied. After all, you're writing a CV about your skills and experience.

Let's take a look at this line from a CV: "I managed a stock room of 10,000+ items." It's a nice line that's written in the first person and displays management skills on a large scale.

You could also write the line in the third person: "He managed a stock room of 10,000+ items."  This does the job, but it sounds a little odd.

However, if you remove the use of pronouns, you get a line that reads: "Managed a stock room of 10,000+ items." This phrasing is more effective, as it is not only more concise, but it also helps you avoid repeating yourself with "I did this" and "I did that."

Job seekers often gravitate towards the use of first-person pronouns in their personal profile. For example: "I am a Stockroom Manager with seven years' experience…" This is acceptable, but the rest of the CV must follow suit and also use first-person pronouns to maintain consistency and professionalism. 

For a stand-out CV, we advise adopting the absent first-person approach and removing all pronouns, both first and third, from every part of your CV. It will keep your CV business-focused (and not too personal) and may free up a bit of space to write about the skills that really matter. This article on the right way to brag on your CV touches on this idea of eliminating pronouns. Read on to learn about how doing so can strengthen your CV.

We'll review your CV for correct pronoun usage. Submit for a free CV review  today!

Recommended reading:

9 Things You Should Always Include in a CV

How to Write a CV With No Work Experience

The Best Skills to Include in a CV, With Examples

Related Articles:

What File Format Is Best for Your CV? Pros + Cons

Best fonts to use for a CV (with examples)

Should you put your address on a CV (with examples)

See how your CV stacks up.

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7 Essential Tips for Writing in the Third Person

7 Essential Tips for Writing in the Third Person

Table of contents

writing cover letter in third person

Alana Chase

Whether you’re a student, business professional, or writer, knowing how to write well in the third person is an essential skill.

But you may not be sure of all the rules or how to make your third-person writing shine.

As an editor and writing coach of 11 years, I’ve taught students and writers at all levels how to master the third-person point of view (POV). All you need to get started is a good understanding of third-person pronouns and a bit of practice for consistency. 

By the end of this article, you’ll know when and how to use third-person perspective. You'll also find helpful tips for taking your third-person writing to the next level.

Key takeaways 

  • In the third-person perspective, the narrator is separate from the story. 
  • Third-person perspective uses he/him/his, she/her/hers, and they/them/their pronouns. 
  • Consistency is key: Don’t switch between perspectives in a single document.
  • Practicing third-person writing and editing your work is vital to improving your skills.

What is third-person point of view (POV)?

In writing, there are three ways to tell a story: first-person, second-person, or third-person POV. 

First-person POV is from the narrator’s perspective: 

“ I saw the bird steal my sandwich, and I ran after it.”

Second-person POV is from the reader’s perspective: 

“ You saw the bird steal your sandwich, and you ran after it.”

Third-person POV, however, separates the narrator from the story and uses third-person pronouns (like he/him, she/her, and they/them) to describe events, actions, thoughts, and emotions. Characters are referred to by name or one of these pronouns: 

“ Alex saw the bird steal his/her/their sandwich, and he/she/they ran after it.”

Third-person POV is used in all kinds of writing — from novels to research papers, journalistic articles, copywriting materials, and more. Check out some examples below.

Examples of third-person perspective

  • In a novel: “Robb and Jon sat tall and still on their horses, with Bran between them on his pony, trying to seem older than seven, trying to pretend that he’d seen all this before.” (From A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin)
  • In a news article : “This weekend, Iceland experienced nearly 2,000 earthquakes within 48 hours. And they’ve kept coming since then – in swarms.” (From “Thousands of earthquakes have scientists watching for a volcanic eruption in Iceland” on NPR’s website )
  • In copywriting : “Balm Dotcom’s formula has antioxidants and natural emollients to nourish dry lips.” (Website copy describing Glossier’s Balm Dotcom lip product )

7 tips for writing in the third person

Just like the first and second person, you’ve probably already written in the third person before. But to do it well , you’ll need some key tips and tricks in your writing toolkit. 

Let’s dive into the seven essentials for third-person writing.

Tip 1: Use third-person determiners and pronouns 

In grammar, determiners introduce and modify nouns. They’re used to specify what a noun refers to (like “ my laptop”) or the quantity of it (like “ many sandwiches”). 

Meanwhile, pronouns are substitutes for nouns, referring to people, places, or things. For example, “Caroline [noun] is a skilled musician, and she [pronoun] especially loves playing the piano.”

When you write in the third person, use only third-person determiners and pronouns. Let’s take a look at the different types of pronouns. 

writing cover letter in third person

Tip 2: Use names for clarity

In third-person writing, using names is crucial for clarity, especially when multiple people/characters share similar pronouns. Strategically incorporate names into your writing to help readers keep track of who’s who. 

For example:

‍ “She submitted the script draft to her, and she made suggestions for changes.”
‍ “Mira submitted the script draft to Lynn, and Lynn made suggestions for changes.”

Tip: Use a character or person’s name when introducing them in your writing. Then, alternate between using pronouns and their name to prevent confusion.

Tip 3: Keep the narration neutral

When you write in the third person, your narrator is an uninvolved observer. They have no opinions on the people, places, things, or events they describe. Their words and tone should be neutral (but not boring).

To achieve this in your writing:

  • Think of your narrator as a reporter. Their job is to detail what’s happening, when and why it’s occurring, who’s involved, and any background information that can give context. They don’t offer a personal interpretation of events. Instead, they provide facts and supporting details.
  • Save the judgment for characters. Rather than having your narrator share their critique of events or individuals, have a character offer their opinion — either through dialogue, actions, or reactions. For instance, instead of writing, “Dr. Shaw was a courageous woman,” let a character convey admiration by telling Dr. Shaw, “I’ve always admired your fearlessness.”
  • Be objective with your descriptions. Avoid subjective adjectives and focus on observable features. For example, instead of describing a landscape as “breathtaking,” write that it’s “marked with snow-capped mountains and patches of tall pine trees.” 

Tip 4: Use descriptive language

Showing — and not just telling — is essential when writing in the third person. Instead of stating emotions and experiences outright, immerse your reader in your character’s reality. Create vivid descriptions of their thoughts, feelings, and surroundings. Use language that engages the senses: sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste. 

For example: 

“Aisha was nervous.”
‍ “Aisha’s hands trembled, and her tongue felt dry against the roof of her mouth. The spotlight above the stage shone white-hot, causing beads of sweat to form along Aisha’s hairline.”

Tip 5: Be consistent

Once you establish a third-person POV, stick to it . Avoid switching from the third person to the first or second person. Otherwise, you’ll confuse the reader and disrupt the flow of your writing.

“Hannah felt a surge of excitement when her telephone rang, anticipating good news about her mortgage application. I felt my heart rate quicken as I answered.” (Switches from the third person to the first person)
“Hannah felt a surge of excitement when her telephone rang, anticipating good news about her mortgage application. She felt her heart rate quicken as she answered.” (Remains in the third person)

Tip 6: Practice

Writing in the third person might feel strange at first, especially if you’re used to using the first or second person. However, it’ll come more naturally to you with practice.

Here are two writing exercises you can try right now:

Writing Exercise #1

Take an excerpt from an article or book written in the first or second person and rewrite it in the third person. Below is an example using The Catcher in the Rye , whose main character is named Holden.

Before: “The other reason I wasn’t down at the game was because I was on my way to say good-by to old Spencer, my history teacher.”

After: “The other reason Holden wasn’t down at the game was because he was on his way to say good-by to old Spencer, his history teacher.”

Writing Exercise #2

Turn on a movie or television show, mute the sound, and closely observe two characters. Give them each a name. Using third-person pronouns and their names, describe the characters’ actions and what you believe they’re thinking and feeling. 

Above all, write in the third person as often as possible , following the tips in this guide. Remember, your writing skills are like muscles: The more you exercise them, the stronger they become. 

Tip 7: Carefully revise 

After you’ve written something in the third person, carefully review and revise your work. 

Check that your writing :

  • Uses third-person determiners and pronouns accurately and consistently
  • Incorporates names where pronouns may cause confusion
  • Maintains a neutral tone, where your narrator doesn’t offer personal opinions or interpretations
  • Doesn’t shift to the first or second person

Make changes where necessary, then read through your work a final time.

AI tip: Wordtune can help you self-edit and help improve your writing overall.

Paste your work into Wordtune’s Editor, or write in it directly, and use the features to shorten or expand your sentences, make your tone more casual or formal, and more. Wordtune will also automatically flag spelling and grammar errors and suggest ways to improve concision, clarity, and flow.

The Casual button in Wordtune takes highlighted text and suggests more casual-sounding replacements.

Get Wordtune for free > Get Wordtune for free >

Bonus tip (advanced): Learn the different types of third-person POV

Did you know there are three types of third-person POV? Getting familiar with them can help you make your writing even more impactful.

  • Third-person objective , where the narrator is “a fly on the wall”: They provide an objective account of events without exploring people/characters’ emotions or thoughts.
  • Third-person omniscient , where the narrator has unlimited knowledge of all events and characters’ thoughts and feelings. 
  • Third-person limited , also called “close third,” where the narrator has access to just one character’s emotions, thoughts, and experiences. 

With this knowledge, you can choose the right perspective for your writing depending on its purpose, tone, and goals. 

For instance, use third-person omniscient to show readers what’s happening with everyone in your novel. Or, you could go for third-person objective in an academic paper where you must present facts without sharing your interpretation of them.

Writing well in the third person takes thought and effort. You must use third-person determiners and pronouns, weave in descriptive language, and keep your narration neutral. You also need to be consistent with your POV, ensuring you don’t accidentally switch to the first or second person. Finally, review and revise your work to make sure it’s clear and error-free. 

Using this guide — and Wordtune’s tools to polish your writing — you’ll get the hang of the third-person perspective in no time.

To continue sharpening your writing skills, read our articles on mastering tone of voice and writing concisely (with help from AI). Then, check out our proofreading guide to keep your work flawless . 

What is a third-person word example?

Third-person words are pronouns like “he,” “her,” “they,” “it,” “hers,” and “theirs.”

Should I write in the first or third person?

It depends on the closeness you want to create with your audience. The first person allows for a personal connection between the narrator and the reader, while the third person creates distance between the narrator and the audience.

What are the disadvantages of writing in the third person?

Third-person writing can lead to a lack of intimacy with the reader. This can be a disadvantage for some writers but an advantage for others, like those in academic and professional settings.

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Are CVs Written in the Third Person?

Generally, there’s no particular rule to this matter. Although recruiters’ arguments about which person is more relevant for use in professional CVs proved that third-person resumes have no such dynamic impact on the reader as the one written in the first person.

Also, job seekers have to remember that CVs should be about YOU selling YOURSELF. And from a psychological point of view, a strong first-person action verb creates more powerful CV statements and comes far more naturally.

That means by using third-person statements you would hardly leave an impression of a distinctive candidate with unique qualifications and a strong personal brand.

How to Start a CV Profile?

One of the most common introductory paragraphs for your Curriculum Vitae is a personal or career profile. It contains a short summary of your background experience and future career objectives.

This section is crucial for catching the employer’s attention, thus you have to know exactly what points of your  CV profile can bring you success . After we figure out how to start your CV document, it’s also important to know what to write for a CV profile in general.

  • So, when it comes to writing your CV profile, you might want to start with a powerful sentence that demonstrates your biggest value as a candidate – your professional experience and a persuasive accomplishment.
  • Keep the statement concise but impactful. This means you have to highlight your experience by stating your current job title along with the accomplishment without going into too many details.
  • Advertise yourself. Selling yourself as a good employee is a great strategy whether it’s a CV or resume, especially when it comes to an opening sentence. After all, 99% of recruiters will read the opening sentence for sure.

What to Write For CV Profile?

Writing a CV career profile helps to highlight your key interests and skills. CV profile is placed at the beginning of your document and has its own structure.

This section is especially helpful for employers, who go through hundreds of applications every day and have no time to review the entire CV. We have already explained how to start a CV profile, so you want to learn that first. After you came up with a great opening sentence, here comes the main part, and here is what you must include in one:

  • Credentials, in other words, relevant experience, and expertise;
  • Length of your experience or achievements;
  • Aspirations, are the position you want to obtain in a certain company/organization.

Note down that Curriculum Vitae itself can stay untailored as you send its copy to different employers and specific positions. However, when it comes to your CV profile, it must always be customized. You should know everything about your target position. It will help you highlight the most interesting qualifications and experience.

How to write a professional CV profile?

Don’t make the  entire CV career profile longer than 100 words. The headline sentence summing up your key experience and plans is also included in those 100 words.

The main part of the summary is just a part that contains more detailed information about your achievements, experience, and even interests. Again, you must stop on the most relevant qualifications that match up to your target position.

Don’t forget to prove your skills with real achievements. You may also want to think of something that will help you stand out from other recruiters. Right after you finish up with your CV profile, think about how you will form responsibilities and achievements in your CV .

writing cover letter in third person

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How to Write in Third Person

Last Updated: February 19, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Alicia Cook . Alicia Cook is a Professional Writer based in Newark, New Jersey. With over 12 years of experience, Alicia specializes in poetry and uses her platform to advocate for families affected by addiction and to fight for breaking the stigma against addiction and mental illness. She holds a BA in English and Journalism from Georgian Court University and an MBA from Saint Peter’s University. Alicia is a bestselling poet with Andrews McMeel Publishing and her work has been featured in numerous media outlets including the NY Post, CNN, USA Today, the HuffPost, the LA Times, American Songwriter Magazine, and Bustle. She was named by Teen Vogue as one of the 10 social media poets to know and her poetry mixtape, “Stuff I’ve Been Feeling Lately” was a finalist in the 2016 Goodreads Choice Awards. There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,128,632 times.

Writing in third person can be a simple task, with a little practice. For academic purposes, third person writing means that the writer must avoid using subjective pronouns like “I” or “you.” For creative writing purposes, there are differences between third person omniscient, limited, objective, and episodically limited points of view. Choose which one fits your writing project.

Writing in Third Person Academically

Step 1 Use third person for all academic writing.

  • Third person helps the writing stay focused on facts and evidence instead of personal opinion.

Step 2 Use the correct pronouns.

  • Third person pronouns include: he, she, it; his, her, its; him, her, it; himself, herself, itself; they; them; their; themselves.
  • Names of other people are also considered appropriate for third person use.
  • Example: “ Smith believes differently. According to his research, earlier claims on the subject are incorrect.”

Step 3 Avoid first person pronouns.

  • First person pronouns include: I, me, my, mine, myself, we, us, our, ours, ourselves. [3] X Research source
  • The problem with first person is that, academically speaking, it sounds too personalized and too subjective. In other words, it may be difficult to convince the reader that the views and ideas being expressed are unbiased and untainted by personal feelings. Many times, when using first person in academic writing, people use phrases like "I think," "I believe," or "in my opinion."
  • Incorrect example: “Even though Smith thinks this way, I think his argument is incorrect.”
  • Correct example: “Even though Smith thinks this way, others in the field disagree.”

Step 4 Avoid second person pronouns.

  • Second person pronouns include: you, your, yours, yourself. [4] X Research source
  • One main problem with second person is that it can sound accusatory. It runs to risk of placing too much responsibility on the shoulders of the reader specifically and presently reading the work.
  • Incorrect example: “If you still disagree nowadays, then you must be ignorant of the facts.”
  • Correct example: “Someone who still disagrees nowadays must be ignorant of the facts.”

Step 5 Refer to the subject in general terms.

  • Indefinite third person nouns common to academic writing include: the writer, the reader, individuals, students, a student, an instructor, people, a person, a woman, a man, a child, researchers, scientists, writers, experts.
  • Example: “In spite of the challenges involved, researchers still persist in their claims.”
  • Indefinite third person pronouns include: one, anyone, everyone, someone, no one, another, any, each, either, everybody, neither, nobody, other, anybody, somebody, everything, someone.
  • Incorrect example: "You might be tempted to agree without all the facts."
  • Correct example: “ One might be tempted to agree without all the facts.”
  • This is usually done in an attempt to avoid the gender-specific “he” and “she” pronouns. The mistake here would be to use the “they” pronoun with singular conjugation. [5] X Research source
  • Incorrect example: “The witness wanted to offer anonymous testimony. They was afraid of getting hurt if their name was spread.”
  • Correct example: “The witness wanted to offer anonymous testimony. They were afraid of getting hurt if their name was spread.”

Writing in Third Person Omniscient

Step 1 Shift your focus from character to character.

  • For instance, a story may include four major characters: William, Bob, Erika, and Samantha. At various points throughout the story, the thoughts and actions of each character should be portrayed. These thoughts can occur within the same chapter or block of narration.
  • Writers of omniscient narratives should be conscious of “head-hopping” — that is, shifting character perspectives within a scene. While this does not technically break the rules of Third Person Omniscience, it is widely considered a hallmark of narrative laziness.

Alicia Cook

  • In a sense, the writer of a third person omniscient story is somewhat like the “god” of that story. The writer can observe the external actions of any character at any time, but unlike a limited human observer, the writer can also peek into the inner workings of that character at will, as well.
  • Know when to hold back. Even though a writer can reveal any information they choose to reveal, it may be more beneficial to reveal some things gradually. For instance, if one character is supposed to have a mysterious aura, it would be wise to limit access to that character's inner feelings for a while before revealing his or her true motives.

Step 3 Avoid use of the first person and second person pronouns.

  • Do not use first person and second person points of view in the narrative or descriptive portions of the text.
  • Correct example: Bob said to Erika, “I think this is creepy. What do you think?”
  • Incorrect example: I thought this was creepy, and Bob and Erika thought so, too. What do you think?

Writing in Third Person Limited

Step 1 Pick a single character to follow.

  • The thoughts and feelings of other characters remain an unknown for the writer throughout the duration of the text. There should be no switching back and forth between characters for this specific type of narrative viewpoint.
  • Unlike first person, where the narrator and protagonist are the same, third person limited puts a critical sliver of distance between protagonist and narrator. The writer has the choice to describe one main character’s nasty habit — something they wouldn’t readily reveal if the narration were left entirely to them.

Step 2 Refer to the character's actions and thoughts from the outside.

  • In other words, do not use first person pronouns like “I,” “me,” “my,” “we,” or “our” outside of dialog. The main character's thoughts and feelings are transparent to the writer, but that character should not double as a narrator.
  • Correct example: “Tiffany felt awful after the argument with her boyfriend.”
  • Correct example: “Tiffany thought, “I feel awful after that argument with my boyfriend.”
  • Incorrect example: “I felt awful after the argument with my boyfriend.”

Step 3 Focus on other characters' actions and words, not their thoughts or feelings.

  • Note that the writer can offer insight or guesses regarding the thoughts of other characters, but those guesses must be presented through the perspective of the main character.
  • Correct example: “Tiffany felt awful, but judging by the expression on Carl's face, she imagined that he felt just as bad if not worse.”
  • Incorrect example: “Tiffany felt awful. What she didn't know was that Carl felt even worse.”

Step 4 Do not reveal any information your main character would not know.

  • Correct example: “Tiffany watched from the window as Carl walked up to her house and rang the doorbell.”
  • Incorrect example: “As soon as Tiffany left the room, Carl let out a sigh of relief.”

Writing in Episodically Limited Third Person

Step 1 Jump from character to character.

  • Limit the amount of pov characters you include. You don't want to have too many characters that confuse your reader or serve no purpose. Each pov character should have a specific purpose for having a unique point of view. Ask yourself what each pov character contributes to the story.
  • For instance, in a romance story following two main characters, Kevin and Felicia, the writer may opt to explain the inner workings of both characters at different moments in the story.
  • One character may receive more attention than any other, but all main characters being followed should receive attention at some point in the story.

Step 2 Only focus on one character's thoughts and perspective at a time.

  • Multiple perspectives should not appear within the same narrative space. When one character's perspective ends, another character's can begin. The two perspectives should not be intermixed within the same space.
  • Incorrect example: “Kevin felt completely enamored of Felicia from the moment he met her. Felicia, on the other hand, had difficulty trusting Kevin.”

Step 3 Aim for smooth transitions.

  • In a novel-length work, a good time to switch perspective is at the start of a new chapter or at a chapter break.
  • The writer should also identify the character whose perspective is being followed at the start of the section, preferably in the first sentence. Otherwise, the reader may waste too much energy guessing.
  • Correct example: “Felicia hated to admit it, but the roses Kevin left on her doorstep were a pleasant surprise.”
  • Incorrect example: “The roses left on the doorstep seemed like a nice touch.”

Step 4 Understand who knows what.

  • For instance, if Kevin had a talk with Felicia's best friend about Felicia's feelings for him, Felicia herself would have no way of knowing what was said unless she witnessed the conversation or heard about it from either Kevin or her friend.

Writing in Third Person Objective

Step 1 Follow the actions of many characters.

  • There does not need to be a single main character to focus on. The writer can switch between characters, following different characters throughout the course of the narrative, as often as needed.
  • Stay away from first person terms like “I” and second person terms like “you” in the narrative, though. Only use first and second person within dialog.

Step 2 Do not attempt to get into directly into a character's head.

  • Imagine that you are an invisible bystander observing the actions and dialog of the characters in your story. You are not omniscient, so you do not have access to any character's inner thoughts and feelings. You only have access to each character's actions.
  • Correct example: “After class, Graham hurriedly left the room and rushed back to his dorm room.”
  • Incorrect example: “After class, Graham raced from the room and rushed back to his dorm room. The lecture had made him so angry that he felt as though he might snap at the next person he met.”

Step 3 Show but don't tell.

  • Correct example: “When no one else was watching her, Isabelle began to cry.”
  • Incorrect example: “Isabelle was too prideful to cry in front of other people, but she felt completely broken-hearted and began crying once she was alone.”

Step 4 Avoid inserting your own thoughts.

  • Let the reader draw his or her own conclusions. Present the actions of the character without analyzing them or explaining how those actions should be viewed.
  • Correct example: “Yolanda looked over her shoulder three times before sitting down.”
  • Incorrect example: “It might seem like a strange action, but Yolanda looked over her shoulder three times before sitting down. This compulsive habit is an indication of her paranoid state of mind.”

Examples of Third Person POV

writing cover letter in third person

Expert Q&A

Alicia Cook

You Might Also Like

Write in Third Person Omniscient

  • ↑ https://stlcc.edu/student-support/academic-success-and-tutoring/writing-center/writing-resources/point-of-view-in-academic-writing.aspx
  • ↑ http://studysupportresources.port.ac.uk/Writing%20in%20the%20third%20peson.pdf
  • ↑ http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/third_person.htm
  • ↑ https://www.grammarly.com/blog/use-the-singular-they/
  • ↑ Alicia Cook. Professional Writer. Expert Interview. 11 December 2020.
  • ↑ https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/point-of-view-first-second-third-person-difference
  • ↑ https://ojs.library.dal.ca/YAHS/article/viewFile/7236/6278

About This Article

Alicia Cook

To write in third person, refer to people or characters by name or use third person pronouns like he, she, it; his, her, its; him, her, it; himself, herself, itself; they; them; their; and themselves. Avoid first and second person pronouns completely. For academic writing, focus on a general viewpoint rather than a specific person's to keep things in third person. In other types of writing, you can write in third person by shifting your focus from character to character or by focusing on a single character. To learn more from our Literary Studies Ph.D., like the differences between third person omniscient and third person limited writing, keep reading the article! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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60+ Cover Letter Examples in 2024 [For All Professions]

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No matter where you are in your career, or what job you’re applying for, submitting a cover letter with your resume is a must . 

Done right, a cover letter will effectively complement your resume and explain to the hiring manager in more detail why you’re the right person for the job.

Writing a cover letter, however, is easier said than done. 

You have to effectively demonstrate that you’ll be able to perform the responsibilities listed in the job description and that you’d be a better fit for the company compared to other candidates. 

And unless you’re a professional writer, this can be a very hard task.

Fortunately, we created these cover letter examples to inspire you and help you get started with your own cover letter!

Let’s dive in!

21 Cover Letter Examples 

#1. career change cover letter example .

cover letter example for career change

Here’s what this cover letter does right:

  • Has an ideal length. This cover letter includes all the relevant information for the hiring manager without getting into too much detail.
  • Relevant introduction. The candidate explains that they’re changing careers and why they want to work in this new field from the get-go.
  • Explains their related experience. The candidate explains how their previous experience in retail sales can help them succeed in PR.

Check out our guide video guide to learn how to write a Cover Letter that gets you HIRED!

#2. Recent Graduate Cover Letter Example 

cover letter example for a recent graduate

  • Personally greets the hiring manager. The candidate has taken the time to find the hiring manager’s name and address them by it, which makes the opening of the cover letter much more personal.
  • Wraps up with a call to action. The candidate wraps up the cover letter by suggesting a meeting with the hiring manager, which makes them more memorable.
  • Explains why the candidate is the right person for the internship. In this cover letter for an internship , the candidate explains how they’ve previously interned in a different firm, which gives them the experience to succeed in this role.

Have you just graduated from college? Make sure to check out our guide on writing an entry-level cover letter from start to finish! 

#3. Middle Management Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Middle Management

  • Use of bullet points. The candidate presents the information in a concise and reader-friendly way, making it easy for the hiring manager to find their key achievements. 
  • Formal closing. The candidate has used a formal and polite tone to conclude their cover letter, which combined with a call to action makes them look professional and passionate about getting the job. 
  • Explains how the company would benefit from hiring them. The candidate outlines exactly what they could do for the company, which not only highlights their skills but also shows they’ve done their research on the company’s needs. 

#4. Business Manager Cover Letter Example

cover letter example for business manager

  • Detailed header. In addition to the must-have contact details, this candidate has also included their professional Twitter and LinkedIn profiles, making it easy for the hiring manager to look more closely into their career. 
  • Concise and to the point. This candidate has used short paragraphs and bullet points to make the cover letter easy to skim through. 
  • Wraps up with a call to action. By letting the hiring manager know they’ll be contacting them soon, they’re more likely to make an impression.

Check out this article for a complete writing guide and an inspiring business manager resume sample. 

#5. Ph.D. Cover Letter Example

cover letter example for phd

Here’s what this cover letter does right: 

  • Attention-grabbing introduction. In the opening paragraph, this candidate explains why they’re passionate about pursuing a Ph.D. in great detail. 
  • Explains the candidate’s qualifications in detail. The candidate builds on their passion by explaining how they’re also qualified for the degree because of their education history and academic achievements. 

#6. Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

cover letter example for senior executive

  • Professional and minimalistic template. This senior executive has used a professional but minimalistic template that lets their work experience do the talking. 
  • Achievement-oriented opening paragraph. Right from the get-go, this candidate explains what makes them so good at their job, effectively grabbing the hiring manager’s attention.  
  • Wraps up with a call to action. By suggesting to have a meeting and discussing how they can help the company meet its goals, the candidate stands more chance to make a positive lasting impression. 

#7. Architect Cover Letter Example 

Cover Letter Example

  • Modern resume template. This architect has picked a template that perfectly matches his industry, as it is professional and modern at the same time. 
  • A personal greeting to the HR. They address the hiring manager by their first name, which helps make a better first impression. 
  • Measurable achievements. By quantifying their achievements, the candidate proves their achievements instead of just claiming them.

Struggling with your architect resume ? Check out our full guide!

#8. Business Analyst Cover Letter Example 

cover letter examples

  • Detailed contact information. The candidate has listed both their LinkedIn and Twitter profiles, providing the HR manager an opportunity to learn more about the candidate.  
  • Mentions what the candidate can do for the company. This cover letter doesn’t just explain why the job would be great for the candidate, but also how the candidate would benefit the company. Win-win, right? 
  • Error-free and reader-friendly. It’s super important for the cover letter to have no spelling or grammatical errors and be reader-friendly. This candidate made sure they did both.

Need a resume alongside your cover letter? Check out our guide on how to write a business analyst resume . 

#9. Consultant Cover Letter Example 

best cover letter example

  • Professional cover letter template. Being an experienced consultant, this candidate has picked a professional template that doesn’t steal the spotlight from their achievements. 
  • Experience and achievement-oriented. The candidate has effectively elaborated on their top achievements relevant to the job. 
  • Highlights the candidate’s passion. To show they want the job, this candidate has also explained how passionate they are about their profession.

For more advice on landing a job as a consultant, check out our guide to writing a consultant resume .

#10. Digital Marketing Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Digital Marketing

  • Creative cover letter template. This digital marketer highlights their originality by picking a creative cover letter template. 
  • Lists the candidate’s awards. The candidate has taken advantage of the cover letter to list their most noteworthy awards in the industry. 
  • Concludes with a call to action. As they used a call to action to conclude their cover letter, the HR manager will be more likely to remember them.

Want to take your digital marketing resume to the next level? Check out our guide!

#11. Graphic Designer Cover Letter Example 

Cover Letter Example for Graphic Designer

  • Detailed contact information. The candidate has included additional contact information such as their website link, as well as their LinkedIn and Twitter profiles.  
  • Ideal length. This cover letter is concise, which means that the HR manager is more likely to read it from start to finish.  
  • Draws attention to the candidate’s strong points. Although this candidate is a recent college graduate, they’ve managed to effectively show that they have enough knowledge and experience to do the job right.

Read this guide to write a graphic designer resume that’s just as good as your cover letter!

#12. Administrative Assistant Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Administrative Assistant

  • Minimalistic cover letter template. The candidate picked a well-designed but minimalistic template for their cover letter. 
  • Focused on skills and achievements. This cover letter is packed with the candidate’s skills and achievements, proving he can be an excellent employee. 
  • Formal closing. Politeness can go a long way and the candidate has used this to their advantage to make an impression. 

Our article on how to write an administrative assistant resume can help you take your job application to the next level.

#13. Front Desk Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Front Desk

  • Modern cover letter template. This template incorporates memorable colors and clear lines, which make the cover letter very visually appealing. 
  • Attention-grabbing introduction. Using an attention-grabbing intro, the candidate is more likely to make an impression. 
  • Calls the HR to action. By including a call to action, the candidate is reminding the HR of their immediate availability. 

#14. Human Resources Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Human Resources

  • It is concise and to the point. The candidate doesn’t dwell on unimportant details the HR won’t be interested in. 
  • Uses a traditional cover letter template. The cover letter design is more on the conventional side, which fits the industry better. 
  • Highlights the candidate’s strong points. The candidate has rich work experience and they use the cover letter to elaborate on it. 

This HR resume guide can help you get your resume just right.

#15. Sales Agent Cover Letter Example 

Cover Letter Example  for Sales Agent

  • Attention-grabbing cover letter template. As a salesperson, this candidate knows how important first impressions are, so they’ve picked a catchy cover letter template. 
  • Has an ideal length. At the same time, they’ve also made sure to keep their cover letter at just the right length. 
  • Lists the candidate’s career highlights. The candidate has made perfect use of the space by mentioning their most impressive professional achievements. 

Check out this sales agent resume guide to create an attention-grabbing sales resume .

#16. Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Receptionist

  • Modern but minimalistic cover letter template. The template’s design hints the candidate is creative but professional at the same time. 
  • Uses a catchy introduction. The candidate has used an attention-grabbing opening paragraph to catch HR’s attention. 
  • Concludes the cover letter formally. The candidate proves that they’re polite and well-spoken, a quality very much important for the role they’re applying for. 

Take your receptionist resume to the next level with this receptionist resume guide .

#17. Information Technology Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Information Technology

  • Mentions measurable achievements. Numbers make an impact, which is why this candidate has included measurable achievements. 
  • Lists both soft and hard skills. The candidate has mentioned a great mix of soft and hard skills, showing how well-rounded they are. 
  • Contains relevant contact information. The candidate’s GitHub, website name, LinkedIn, and Twitter profiles are all great additions to the resume. 

Looking for tips to help you write a great IT resume ? Check out our guide!

#18. Real Estate Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Real Estate Agent

  • Ideal length. Short and to the point, this cover letter is bound to get noticed by the HR manager. 
  • Wraps up with a call to action. This candidate reinforces the HR to call them back through a final call to action. 
  • Mentions the right skills. On top of their sales accomplishments, the candidate touch upon important soft skills such as customer service and communication . 

This real estate resume guide will help you take your resume from good to great.

#19. Teacher Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Teacher

  • Mentions relevant contact information details. This candidate has included optional (but relevant) contact information details, such as their LinkedIn, Quora, and Medium profiles. 
  • Achievement-oriented. The candidate has elaborated on their achievements in more detail throughout their cover letter. 
  • Highlights the candidate’s passion. For some jobs, being passionate is much more important than for others. Teaching is one of these jobs, which is why this candidate explains their passion for the job. 

Our guide on how to write a teacher resume has all the tips you need to land the job.

#20. Project Manager Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Project Manager

  • Leverages a catchy introduction. Through a catchy introductory paragraph, this candidate is sure to grab the HR’s attention and get them to read the rest of their cover letter.
  • Lists measurable accomplishments. This candidate explains exactly what they’ve achieved using numbers and hard data. 
  • Personally greets the HR. A personal greeting sounds much better than “Dear Sir/Madam,” and the candidate knows this. 

This guide on how to write a project manager resume can help you perfect your appication.

#21. Paralegal Cover Letter Example

Cover Letter Example for Paralegal

  • Minimalistic cover letter template. This cover letter design looks good but doesn’t steal the show from the candidate’s abilities.
  • Mentions the candidate’s academic achievements and extracurricular activities. Although the candidate is a recent graduate, they’ve used the cover letter to explain they have enough skills and achievements to do the job.
  • Lists measurable achievements. The candidate proves they did well in their internship by mentioning quantifiable achievements.

Check out this paralegal resume guide to perfect yours.

40+ More Cover Letter Examples and Guides 

Couldn’t find a cover letter example for your field? Do not worry.

Below you can find a number of other cover letter examples for different fields and industries:

  • Acting Cover Letter Examples
  • Accounting Cover Letter Examples
  • Administrative Assistant Cover Letter Examples
  • Architecture Cover Letter Examples
  • Attorney Cover Letter Examples
  • Barista Cover Letter Examples
  • Bartender Cover Letter Examples
  • Business Cover Letter Examples
  • Business Analyst Cover Letter Examples
  • College Student Cover Letter Examples
  • Computer Science Cover Letter Examples
  • Construction Cover Letter Examples
  • Consultant Cover Letter Examples
  • Customer Service Cover Letter Examples
  • Data Analyst Cover Letter Examples
  • Data Entry Cover Letter Examples
  • Dental Assistant Cover Letter Examples
  • Digital Marketing Cover Letter Examples
  • Elementary Teacher Cover Letter Examples
  • Engineering Cover Letter Examples
  • Executive Assistant Cover Letter Examples
  • Finance Cover Letter Examples
  • Graphic Design Cover Letter Examples
  • Healthcare Cover Letter Examples
  • Human Resources Cover Letter Examples
  • IT Cover Letter Examples
  • Law Cover Letter Examples
  • Management Cover Letter Examples
  • Marketing Cover Letter Examples
  • Mechanical Engineering Cover Letter Examples
  • Medical Assistant Cover Letter Examples
  • Nurse Practitioner Cover Letter Examples
  • Physician Cover Letter Examples
  • Project Manager Cover Letter Examples
  • Receptionist Cover Letter Examples
  • Retail Cover Letter Examples
  • Sales Cover Letter Examples
  • Social Work Cover Letter Examples
  • Software Engineer Cover Letter Examples
  • Substitute Teacher Cover Letter Examples
  • Teacher Assistant Cover Letter Examples
  • Team Leader Cover Letter Example

What is a Cover Letter? 

A cover letter is a one-page document that you submit as part of your job application, alongside your resume . 

Its purpose is to introduce you and briefly summarize your professional background. On average, your cover letter should be from 250 to 400 words long .

A good cover letter can give the hiring manager more insight into what makes you a good candidate and help them make up their mind about whether they should invite you for an interview. A bad cover letter, though, will get ignored (at best) and lose you the job (at worst).

So, to make sure this doesn’t happen, it’s essential to know how to write a convincing cover letter.

The first thing to remember is that a cover letter is a supplement to your resume, not a replacement. Meaning, you shouldn’t just repeat whatever is mentioned in your resume and call it a day. 

Optimally, you should use your cover letter to shed more light on your skills and qualifications, as well as explain anything you didn’t have space for in your resume (e.g. a career gap or why you’re changing careers).

If you’re writing a cover letter for the first time, though, putting all this together might seem pretty tough. 

Fortunately, you can follow our tried-and-tested format to make the experience much easier:

  • Header - Input your contact information.
  • Greeting the hiring manager - Open the cover letter with a “Dear Sir or Madam,” or use the hiring manager’s name if you know what that is.
  • Opening paragraph - Grab the hiring manager’s attention by getting straight to the point. Mention what your professional experiences are, and what role you’re applying for.
  • The second paragraph - Explain why you’re the perfect candidate for the job. Mention your top 2-3 achievements, your top skills, why you want to work in that specific industry, and whatever else is relevant.
  • The third paragraph - End your cover letter with a call to action. E.g. “I would love to meet personally and discuss how I can help Company X.”
  • Formal closing - Something like this: “Thank you for your consideration. Best, John Doe.”

Here’s what this looks like in practice:

cover letter structure

9 Tips to Write a Cover Letter (the Right Way)

Now that we've covered the basics, let's talk about cover letter tips . Below, we'll give you all the knowledge you need to take your cover letter from "OK" to "great."

#1. Pick the right template

A good cover letter is all about leaving the right first impression.

And what’s a better way to leave a good impression than through a professional, well-formatted, and visual template?

You can simply pick one of our tried-and-tested cover letter templates and you’ll be all set!

cover letter examples templates

#2. Add your contact details on the header

The best way to start your cover letter is through a header. 

Here’s what you want to include there:

  • Phone Number
  • Name of the hiring manager / their professional title
  • Name of the company you’re applying to

Optionally, you can also include the following:

  • Social Media Profiles - Any type of profile that’s relevant to your field. Social Profiles on websites like LinkedIn, GitHub (for developers), Medium (for writers), etc.
  • Personal Website - If you have a personal website that somehow adds value to your application, you can mention it. Let’s say you’re a professional writer. In that case, you’d want to link to your content portfolio site or blog.

#3. Greet the hiring manager the right way

Once you’ve listed all your relevant contact information, it’s time to address the hiring manager reading your cover letter. 

A good practice here is to find the hiring manager’s name and address them directly instead of using the traditional “dear sir or madam.” This shows that you’re really invested in the company and that you took your time to do some research about the job.

So, how can you find out the hiring manager’s name?

One way to do this is by looking up the head of the company’s relevant department on LinkedIn. Let’s say you’re applying for the position of Communication Specialist at Novoresume. The hiring manager is probably the Head of Communications or the Chief Communications Office.

Or let’s say you’re applying for the position of server at a restaurant. In that case, you’d be looking to find out who the restaurant manager is.

If this doesn’t work, you can also check out the “Team” page on the company website; there’s a good chance you’ll at least find the right person there.

If you still can’t find out the hiring manager’s name, here are several other greetings you can use:

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • To whom it may concern
  • Dear [Department] Team

#4. Create an attention-grabbing introduction

Recruiters get hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of applications. Chances are, they’re not going to be reading every single cover letter end-to-end.

So, it’s essential to catch their attention from the very first paragraph.

The problem with most cover letter opening paragraphs, though, is that they’re usually extremely generic, often looking something like this: 

Hey, my name is Jonathan and I’d like to work as a Sales Manager at XYZ Inc. I’ve worked as a sales manager at MadeUpCompany Inc. for 5+ years, so I believe that I’d be a good fit for the position.

As you can probably tell, this opening paragraph doesn’t tell the hiring manager anything other than that you’ve worked the job before - and that’s not really helpful in setting you apart from other candidates. 

What you want to do, instead, is start off with 2-3 of your top achievements to really grab the reader’s attention. Preferably, the achievements should be as relevant as possible to the position. 

For example:

My name’s Michael and I’d like to help XYZ Inc. hit and exceed its sales goals as a Sales Manager. I’ve worked with Company X, a fin-tech company, for 3+ years. As a Sales Representative, I generated an average of $30,000+ in sales per month (beating the KPIs by around 40%). I believe that my previous industry experience, as well as my excellence in sales, makes me the right candidate for the role of X at Company Y.

The second example shows how the candidate is a top performer. The first just shows that they’ve worked a sales job before.

Which one are YOU more likely to invite for an interview?

#5. Show you’re the perfect person for the job

One great thing about cover letters is that they allow you to expand more on the top achievements from your resume and really show the hiring manager that you’re the right person for the job. 

A good way to do that is to first read the job ad and really understand what skills/experiences are required, and then to ensure that your cover letter touches upon the said skills or experiences.

In my previous role as a Facebook Marketing Expert at XYZ Inc. I handled customer acquisition through ads, managing a monthly Facebook ad budget of $20,000+. As the sole digital marketer at the company, I managed the ad creation and management process end-to-end. This means I created the ad copy and images, as well as picked the targeting, ran optimization trials, and so on.

Other than Facebook advertising, I’ve also delved into other online PPC channels, including:

  • Google Search

#6. Explain why you’re a great company fit

The HR manager doesn’t only look at whether you’ll be good at the job or not. They’re looking for someone that’s also a good fit for the company culture.

After all, employees that don’t fit in are bound to quit, sooner or later. This ends up costing the company a ton of money, up to 50% of the employee’s annual salary . 

To convince the hiring manager that you’re a great company fit, do some research on the company and find out what it is you like about them, or about working there. You want to know things like:

  • What’s the company’s business model?
  • What’s the company's product or service? Have you used it?
  • What’s the culture like? Will someone micro-manage your work, or will you have autonomy on how you get things done?

Then, turn your top reasons for liking to work there into text and add them to your cover letter! 

#7. Wrap up with a call to action

To make the end of your cover letter as memorable as possible, you want to:

  • Wrap up any points you couldn't in the previous paragraphs. Mention anything you’ve left out that you think could help the hiring manager make up your mind.
  • Thank the hiring manager for their time. After all, it never hurts to be polite. 
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action. A call to action is a great way to make your cover letter ending as memorable as possible. 

#8. Write a formal closing

Once you’re done with the final paragraph, all you have to do is write down a formal “goodbye” and you’re good to go.

Feel free to use one of the most popular conclusions in a cover letter:

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,

#9. Proofread your cover letter

Last but not least, make sure to always proofread each and every document that you’ll be including in your job application - cover letter included. 

The last thing you want is to be claiming you’re a great candidate for the job with a cover letter full of typos! 

For an even more comprehensive guide on how to write an impactful cover letter , check out our article ! 

Cover Letter Writing Checklist 

Cover Letter Writing Checklist

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you still have some questions about cover letters? Check out the answers below:

1. How do I write a simple cover letter? 

To write a cover letter that’s simple but also professional, make sure to include a header with your personal information, a formal greeting to the hiring manager, an attention-grabbing opening paragraph, a second paragraph explaining why you’re a good candidate for the job, and a formal closing (preferably with a call to action). 

2. What are the 3 parts of a cover letter? 

The three parts of a cover letter are: 

  • The introduction , namely the header, the greeting to the hiring manager, and the opening paragraph. 
  • The sales pitch is usually the body of the cover letter. 
  • The conclusion involves a formal closing and a signature line.

3. What makes a great cover letter?

A great cover letter should be personalized for each job you’re applying for, instead of being overly generic. It’s also preferable to address the hiring manager by their name and not use the overly-used “Dear Sir/Madam.”

To make a great first impression, you should mention 1-2 of your top achievements in your opening paragraph - the more job-specific they are, the better. Also, don’t stop at showing the hiring manager why you’re a great candidate for the job. Make sure to also talk about how you’re a good culture fit for the company.

Last but not least, wrap up your closing paragraph with a call to action to give the hiring manager a little extra something to remember you by. 

4. When is a cover letter necessary?

Unless the job ad specifically states otherwise, you should always include a cover letter with your job application .

Even if the hiring manager doesn’t read it, you will look more professional simply by including one.

And that’s a wrap! We hope our cover letter examples and writing tips will inspire you to write a cover letter that will land you your next job.

If you’re looking for more invaluable career advice and articles, make sure to check out our career blog , or any of these related articles: 

  • How to Write a Resume
  • Cover Letter Mistakes to Avoid at All Costs
  • Cover Letter Format (w/ Examples & Free Templates)

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How to Write in 3rd Person About Yourself

Keep reading for some helpful advice on how to write in 3rd person about yourself.

Table of Contents

It can be tricky to write in 3rd person about yourself, but with a bit of practice and some helpful tips, you’ll be able to do it like a pro. In this blog post, we’ll discuss some dos and don’ts for writing in 3rd person about yourself, as well as provide a few examples to help get you started. So whether you’re struggling to find the right words or just want to switch things up a bit, keep reading for some helpful advice on how to write in 3rd person about yourself.

What is 3rd person point of view, and why use it?

When you write in third person point of view, you are writing as a third-party observer. You can write about other people and events as if you were writing a story. The third-person point of view is often used in fiction writing, but it can also be used in non-fiction writing, such as biography or journalism. One advantage of the third-person point of view is that it allows you to write in a more objective and impartial voice .

This can be helpful when you are writing about controversial topics or sensitive subjects. Another advantage of the third-person point of view is that it gives you the flexibility to move between different characters’ perspectives.

This can be useful for exploring the different sides of a complex issue. However, one downside of the third-person point of view is that it can make your writing feel less personal and intimate. If you want your writing to have a more personal tone, you might consider writing in the first or second-person point of view.

How to write in 3rd person about yourself

When writing in the third person about yourself, use your name or pronouns such as “he,” “she,” “it,” or “they.” For example, you might say, “She always tries to be on time for her appointments.” You can also use a third-person point of view to describe other people in your life, such as family members or friends. Just be sure to use the correct pronoun when referring to them.

If you’re not sure which pronoun to use, try reading your sentence out loud and seeing which one sounds natural. You can also consult a grammar guide or ask a friend for help. When in doubt, it’s always better to err on the side of caution and use the pronoun that is less likely to offend or be misinterpreted.

Writing in the third person about yourself can feel a bit strange at first. However, there are a few simple tips you can follow to help you get started.

First, think about how you would describe yourself if you were writing about someone else. What words would you use to describe your personality and appearance?

What kind of things do you like to do in your spare time? Once you have a good sense of how you would like to be seen by others, it will be easier to start writing in the third person.

Another helpful tip is to read your work aloud after you have written it. This will help you to catch any instances where you accidentally slip into first or second-person point of view. With a little practice, writing in the third person about yourself will become second nature.

Examples of 3rd person writing about oneself

In writing, the third person point of view is when the writer uses pronouns like “he,” “she,” or “it,” as opposed to first-person (“I”) or second person (“you”). Third-person writing can be either limited, meaning that the writer includes only information known by the character, or omniscient, meaning that the writer can include information about anyone or anything. Examples of third-person writing about oneself might include: 

– She isn’t sure why she decided to go into teaching. 

– He always gets nervous before a big presentation. 

– It wasn’t until after she had kids that she realized how important family is. 

In each of these examples, the speaker uses third-person pronouns to talk about themselves. This type of writing can help create distance between the writer and their subject matter, making it easier to be objective. It can also make writing more engaging for readers, who feel like they are observing someone else’s story unfold.

Dos and don’ts for writing in 3rd person about yourself

When writing in the third person about yourself, remember that you are still the subject of your writing. You should avoid using overly technical or jargon-filled language. Instead, opt for clear and concise writing that will be easy for readers to follow.

Stay consistent with the point of view you have chosen throughout your writing. If you switch back and forth between the first, second, and third person, it will be confusing for readers and make your writing less effective.

Finally, don’t be afraid to use pronouns like “I” or “me” occasionally. This can help to add a more personal touch to your writing and make it feel less detached.

When used correctly, writing in the third person about yourself can be an excellent way to add depth and interest to your work. Just be sure to keep these dos and don’ts in mind, and you’ll be on your way to writing like a pro.

Final tips for mastering 3rd person point of view

Now that you know the basics of writing in the third person about yourself, it’s time to put your skills to the test. Here are a few final tips to help you get started:

– Start by brainstorming a list of topics or ideas you would like to write about. 

– Once you have a topic, try writing a sentence or two in the third person about it. 

– If you get stuck, try reading your work aloud to see if you are slipping into first or second-person point of view.

With a little practice, you’ll be writing in the third person like a pro in no time!

How to Find Your Writing Voice

How to write a cover letter.

Willow Tenny

When it comes to writing, Willow Tenny is a true pro. She has a wealth of experience in SEO copywriting and creative writing, and she knows exactly what it takes to produce quality content. On her blog, Willow Writes, Willow shares top writing strategies with both beginners and experienced writers.

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CDC: Workshop - In-Person: Resume & Cover Letter Writing

Get noticed! Attend this in-person workshop to learn how to prepare a professional resume and cover letter that will uniquely communicate your career objectives, skills and education.

California State University, Long Beach

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writing cover letter in third person

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IMAGES

  1. How To Write A Letter In Third Person

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  2. What To Include In A Cover Letter (With Examples)

    writing cover letter in third person

  3. How to Write a Cover Letter for Any Job in 8 Steps (2023)

    writing cover letter in third person

  4. Copywriter Cover Letter Examples & Writing Guide

    writing cover letter in third person

  5. 5 Ways to Write in Third Person

    writing cover letter in third person

  6. Guide to Writing a Perfect Cover Letter

    writing cover letter in third person

VIDEO

  1. CV Writing & Cover Letter

  2. When you remove the 3rd letter of your name (credit to marrkadams)

  3. put the third letter of your name

COMMENTS

  1. 10 Cover Letter Dos and Don'ts

    Cover Letter Don'ts. Mistake #1: Don't Overuse "I" Your cover letter is not your autobiography. The focus should be on how you meet an employer's needs, not on your life story. Avoid the perception of being self-centered by minimizing your use of the word "I," especially at the beginning of your sentences. Mistake #2: Don't Use a Weak Opening ...

  2. Should I write my CV in the first person or third person?

    Answer: In short, you don't always have to write your CV in the third person - both the first and the third are acceptable. However, the secret to great CV writing is removing the use of pronouns entirely; candidates don't need to use "I," "he," or "she," because its use is implied. After all, you're writing a CV about your skills and experience.

  3. How to Write a Cover Letter in 2024 + Examples

    Header - Input contact information. Greeting the hiring manager. Opening paragraph - Grab the reader's attention with 2-3 of your top achievements. Second paragraph - Explain why you're the perfect candidate for the job. Third paragraph - Explain why you're a good match for the company.

  4. How To Write in the Third Person: 7 Essential Tips (+ Bonus Tip)

    7 tips for writing in the third person. Just like the first and second person, you've probably already written in the third person before. But to do it well, you'll need some key tips and tricks in your writing toolkit. Let's dive into the seven essentials for third-person writing. Tip 1: Use third-person determiners and pronouns

  5. How to Write a Cover Letter for Any Job in 2024

    Step 9: Stay Formal in the Closing Salutation. Once you've written the body of your cover letter, you just need to put a formal closing at the very end. Write "Sincerely" and follow it with your full name. Adding your handwritten signature is optional (recommended for more formal cover letters).

  6. How to Write a Standout Cover Letter in 2022

    Step 2: Add your contact info. At the top of your cover letter, you should list out your basic info. You can even copy the same heading from your resume if you'd like. Some contact info you might include (and the order you might include it in) is: Your name. Your pronouns (optional)

  7. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Respectfully, Kind regards, Best regards, Yours truly, Then, make two spaces below the salutation, and type your full name. For some professional (but optional) flair, sign your cover letter either with a scan of your signature or by using software like DocuSign. 8. Check your cover letter's content and formatting.

  8. How to Write a Cover Letter For Any Job + Expert Tips

    Place your name, city, state, ZIP code, phone number and email address in your cover letter heading. Your email address should be professional like "[email protected]," and not personal like "[email protected]." Include links to your LinkedIn profile or professional online portfolio if you have one.

  9. How to Write a Cover Letter Guide + Examples

    How to write a cover letter. Here, we'll break down the process of writing a cover letter in six easy steps: Add a structured header. Address the hiring manager. Write an opening paragraph that grabs reader's attention. Prove your value in the main body paragraph (s). Close your letter with positivity and thanks.

  10. How to Write A Cover Letter in 2022 (6 Tips

    Visually Match Your Resumé. The heading of your letter should correlate with your resumé, the font should be the same and the paper (if you're printing it) should also be the same. Along with your resume, your cover letter is part of a pair, and this pair should be visually consistent.

  11. Should I Write My Resume in First or Third Person?

    A resume written in the third person gives the distance necessary to enable the recruiter to focus on the value you can add, rather than what you're like as a person. By adopting the third person approach, you will also avoid the self-centered impression created by using "I" on every other line. Jerome Knyszewski, writing on LinkedIn ...

  12. 4 Ways to Make Writing Cover Letters Less Painful

    Think from the perspective of a friend, mentor, or previous employer— someone who would only sing your praises —and then write the letter from her point of view. If it helps, you can even ...

  13. Guardian Jobs advice on how to write a cover letter

    A Guardian Jobs survey found that 83% of recruiters find spelling mistakes the worst CV clanger. The general consensus is your cover letter should be no longer than 1 side of A4 paper. "Three to four short paragraphs is generally enough to pique your reader's interest," advises Clare Whitmell, founder of JobMarketSuccess.com.

  14. 3 Common Cover Letter Mistakes That You Can Fix

    Telling the reader what you've accomplished and how it directly translates to meeting the company's needs is always a better use of space than gushing. 2. The Opening Sentence. If your first line reads: "I am writing to apply for [job] at [company]," I will delete it and suggest a swap every time.

  15. Should CV be in Third Person?

    CV Writing Tips. Generally, there's no particular rule to this matter. Although recruiters' arguments about which person is more relevant for use in professional CVs proved that third-person resumes have no such dynamic impact on the reader as the one written in the first person. Also, job seekers have to remember that CVs should be about ...

  16. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    Middle paragraph (s) Closing paragraph. Letter ending and signature. Your cover letter should be one page long and use a simple, professional font, such as Arial or Helvetica, 10 to 12 points in size. Your letter should be left-aligned with single spacing and one-inch margins. Show Transcript.

  17. 6 Ways to Write in Third Person

    Writing in third person can be a simple task, with a little practice. For academic purposes, third person writing means that the writer must avoid using subjective pronouns like "I" or "you." For creative writing purposes, there are differences between third person omniscient, limited, objective, and episodically limited points of view.

  18. How to Write a Cover Letter With No Experience + Examples

    1. Check the company and job description. The first step in crafting a well-written cover letter is to research the company where you want to work. Carefully review what the organization shares about its values and culture on social media or its website to understand how you can relate to it in your letter.

  19. word choice

    Jan 10, 2012 at 22:03. 2. The cover letter should be in the first person. In the resume/CV, the data items should be impersonal, mentioning no person at all (neither 'I', nor 'he/she'). - Mitch. Jan 10, 2012 at 22:08. As you can see from the answers given, there is no universal rule.

  20. 60+ Cover Letter Examples in 2024 [For All Professions]

    Middle Management Cover Letter Example #4. Business Manager Cover Letter Example #5. Ph.D. Cover Letter Example #6. Senior Executive Cover Letter Example #7. Architect Cover Letter Example #8. Business Analyst Cover Letter Example #9. Consultant Cover Letter Example #10. Digital Marketing Cover Letter Example #11.

  21. How to write the perfect cover letter (With examples)

    To start your cover letter, introduce yourself. This means including your full name, your specific interest in the position and the reasons you've chosen to apply. If you got a referral to the job from another party, ensure to mention this in the first paragraph. 2. Mention your skills and qualifications.

  22. How to Write in 3rd Person About Yourself

    When writing in the third person about yourself, use your name or pronouns such as "he," "she," "it," or "they.". For example, you might say, "She always tries to be on time for her appointments.". You can also use a third-person point of view to describe other people in your life, such as family members or friends.

  23. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Literary Journal Submission

    What your cover letter should do is indicate your professionalism so the editor can get past the cover letter and on to the story. It should be a gateway, not a barrier. It should be a gateway ...

  24. CDC: Workshop

    CDC: Workshop - In-Person: Resume & Cover Letter Writing. Get noticed! Attend this in-person workshop to learn how to prepare a professional resume and cover letter that will uniquely communicate your career objectives, skills and education. Event Details. When. Tuesday, March 19, 2024, 12 - 1pm.

  25. Trump has failed to get appeal bond for $454 mln civil fraud judgment

    Donald Trump has so far been unable to obtain a bond that would allow him to appeal a $454 million judgment against him in a New York civil fraud case without posting the full amount himself, his ...